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HORTICULTURA 
SOCIETY 



1617 PENNSYLVANIA BOULEVARD 
PHILADELPHIA 3, PENNSYLVANIA 




VOL I No. I 



MARCH I960 






FERTILIZER FACTS FOR LAWNS 



Experiment station and university researchers 
have upset many of the old rules and ideas about 
fertilizing lawns in recent years. It is none too early 
to consider these facts if you have not already done so, 
since the first application of fertilizer should be made 
to your lawn by mid-March. 

For many years the standard, rule of thumb guide 
for using the so-called complete fertilizers (5-10-5, 
10-10 10) has been to apply them at a rate which 
furnishes one pound of actual nitrogen per thousand 
square feet of lawn area four times a year. Since a 
fertilizer having the analysis 5-10-5 contains 5% nitro- 
gen, 10% phosphoric acid and 5% potash, twenty 
pounds are required to provide the one pound per 
thousand square feet of actual nitrogen per application 
(or ten pounds of 10-10-10). Few lawns are fortunate 
enough to receive four feedings per year at this rate. 
yet recent tests show that lawn grasses increase in 
health and vigor in direct proportion to the nitrogen 
provided up to eight pounds per thousand square feet. 
Most lawns are actually nitrogen hungr)^ 

Organic vs. Inorganic 

As for the value of organic versus inorganic 
(chemical) sources of nitrogen, it has long been known 
that nitrogen derived from organics, such as shredded 
manures, sewer sludge, tankage and cotton seed meal, 
must be broken down by soil bacteria before the 
nitrogen becomes available to plants. Since these 
bacteria are not active when soil temperatures are 
below 60° F.. an early spring application of one of 
these materials does no good until warmer weather 
arrives with higher soil temperatures. Although some 
gardeners believe that it is impossible to burn plants 
with organic fertilizers, it is nonetheless possible to 
do so. Applied at cool temperatures and when results 
are not immediately visible, it is easy to be fooled 
into making additional applications. Then, when the 
soil warms to the critical 60° F., the bacteria go to 
work at a frenzied pace and release a potentially 
lethal quantity of nitrogen to the plants all at once. 

Since the cool periods of spring and fall are the 
most important in lawn growth it immediately becomes 
obvious that organic fertilizers have limited use. Most 
lawn experts agree that a dense, vigorous turf is the 
best weapon with which to fight crabgrass and other 
lawn weeds, and that chemical killers should be used 
as a secondarv method of control. This makes even 



more crucial the need for an available supply of nitro- 
gen when growth first starts in spring. 

While the advantage of the inorganics is the fact 
that they are quickly available regardless of tempera- 
tures, their disadvantage is that little nitrogen remams 
available for an extended period. What is not used 
within a short time, leaches away. Recently, however, 
a new type of fertilizer has come into use which com- 
bines the better features of the organics and inor- 
ganics : ureaform. 

Ureaform fertilizers are safe enough to use so 
that in one application enough nitrogen can be sup- 
plied for a full summer's growth. They do not burn. 
The secret of this material is in the fact that the 
nitrogen is released slowly and at an even rate over a 
period of six to eight months. Unfortunately, like 
organics (ureaform is a synthetic organic), the nitro- 
gen is not released at low temperatures, except in very 
small amounts. To solve this problem, the ureaform 
source of nitrogen is now combined with an inorganic 
source in several trade products. These provide cool 
weather nitrogen for early growth and ureaform for 
the long pull through summer. 

The ureaform fertilizers help to solve another 
problem, one which is particularly pertinent to the 
Philadelphia area. While it is desirable to keep the 
wanted grasses growing well into summer to combat 
unwanted crabgrass. soft growth such as might be the 
result of a summer application of an inorganic fertili- 
zer, is undesirable. The decaying clippings from 
such growth combined with the high heat and humid- 
ity, provide a virtual hot bed for the culture of certain 
grass diseases. Summer applications of organics also 
contribute to this condition and produce unpleasant 
odors as well. 

Basic Recommendation 

A sound, basic recommendation for lawn feeding 
calls for an inorganic-ureaform combination prod- 
uct with an analysis of 10-6-4. in which 50% or more 
of the nitrogen should be ureaform. Apply it at the 
rate of 25 to 40 pounds per thousand square feet (the 
higher rate for Merion bluegrass lawns) in mid-March 
and early September. Be sure the grass is dry at the 
time of the September application and water it in well, 
immediately afterward. 

(con+inued next page) 



FERTILIZER FACTS FOR LAWNS— {Continued) 

Don't be confused by the 50% or 60% ureaform 
label on the fertilizer bag. This simply means that 
half or more of the total nitrogen (which is still only 
10% of the entire fertilizer) is derived from ureaform 
compounds. This has influence on price, because 
a combination fertilizer of a given analysis, such as 
10-6-4, may contain any amount of ureaform nitrogen. 
The word ureaform alone, no matter how big and 
bright the letters, does not promise results ; the 
amount of ureaform is important. 

While the old, morganic 5-10-5 is still sold and 
used in large quantities for lawn feeding and might be 
considered the least expensive material, actual com- 
parison of costs proves this to be untrue. An eighty 
pound bag of 5-10-5 sells at $3.84 -$4.00. The same 
number of pounds of one of the combination materials 
sells for $6.50 - $7.50, but price per pound does not 
determine cost. To apply four pounds of actual nitro- 
gen per thousand square feet of lawn with 5-10-5 
requires four applications of twenty pounds each. 
Total cost: $3.85 -$4.00. To apply the same four 
pounds of actual nitrogen to the same area with a 
combination product having a 10-6-4 analysis, re- 
quires two applications of twenty pounds each. Total 
cost : $3.25 - $3.75. 

Not only is the cost of material less when an 
inorganic-ureaforni combination product is used, but 
the analysis is better suited to lawn needs (lower 
phosphoric acid content) and it is applied in half as 
many applications. Time is worth something, too. 



As a MEMBER did you know 

. . . that you can get books from the Society 
library by mail? Current books on all garden subjects 
are available and a telephone call or a post card will 
luring them to you if you are unable to come into the 
library. Trade catalogs from plant specialists are also 
available for use in the library as well as special plant 
society publications, magazines having to do with 
gardening, and reference works pertaining to horti- 
culture. The rare book collection is available for 
special studies or if you are interested in a topic in 
which it can be helpful. 



YEARBOOK AVAILABLE 

The 1960 YE.ARBOQK, which contains 
the various committee reports for the year 
1959 and a list of officers and Council mem- 
bers, is ready. Members may obtain a copy 
by dropping a postcard to the Society; or 
telephone LQ 3-8352 and your copy will be 
put into the mail immediately. 



FOR EARLY SPRING 

Nothing is quite so uninteresting as a bunch of 
forsythia twigs stuck in a vase, no matter how early 
they are forced into bloom. Instead, take one long 
elegant forsythia branch with inherent good line and 
force it. Even a six or eight-foot long branch, cut 
off near the ground line, will come into bloom indoors. 
Put it in a good sized container on the floor and 
fasten the branch in a semi-espaliered fashion to the 
wall, or across a large window (it need be fastened 
in only one or two places) and give yourself a golden 
tree in mid-March. 

As for the forcing technique, it is almost too 
simple to even consider it technique. First of all, cut 
your branches on a warmish day when the tempera- 
ture is above freezing. There is some indication that 
the temperature at the time of cutting has bearing on 
the degree of success. As you do your cutting, keep 
in mind the container or manner in which you intend 
to use the various branches. Select branches which 
are heavily budded for the greatest floral effect. 

After bringing the branches into the house, im- 
merse them in luke warm water (the bathtub is ideal) 
for three or four hours to soften the bud tissues. Then 
make a good clean cut at the base of the branch, slit 
the stem two or three times with a knife or split it 
by giving it a moderate blow with a hammer. Put 
the branches in warm water and keep them in a cool, 
bright place such as a sunny basement window, heated 
sunporch or similar place where temperatures are 
well above freezing but below the 70° F. of most 
rooms. Check the water every few days and add 
more when needed. Also, spray the branches with luke 
warm water from time to time if convenient, and in 
slower to force kinds cut off a bit of the base of the 
branch once a week or so. 

Kinds To Force 

Trees and shrubs which come into bloom quickly 

are forsythia. flowering quince, the various witch- 
hazels, corylus, lindera. fragrant viburnum, (Viburnum 
fragrans), winter honeysuckle, (Lonicera fragrantis- 
simaj, Japanese pieris, corylopsis, parrotia. Larch 
forces very easily and while it does not have conspic- 
uous flowers, the new, soft green needles (it is a decid- 
uous conifer) are particularly lovely. 

Nearly as quick to bloom as the above are the 
various flowering cherries and crabapples, magnolias 
of many kinds, flowering peach, pear, apple and blue- 
berry. Brown leaved Schwedler maple, common Nor- 
way maple and sassafras all have interesting flowers 
which come into bloom quickly, too. Dogwood and 
lilac are more difficult, they are slow and force better 
at cool temperatures, otherwise the flowers are apt 
to be deformed. 

Do not limit your selection to this list. Even 
some branches which do liot come into bloom will 
produce fresh green leaves to herald the new season. 



BIRDS IN YOUR GARDEN 

"If you have not already begun to feed the winter 
birds when you read this, begin now," advises Pro- 
fessor Arthur A. Allen, eminent ornithologist of Cor- 
nell University in his "Book of Bird Life." 

What food to use? Suet for the insect eating 
birds: woodpeckers, nuthatches, chickadees, brown 
creepers, Carolina wrens, titmice and jays.. Seed (a 
general wild bird mixture) for the grain eaters: juncos, 
white throats, song sparrows, cardinals, purple finches, 
redpolls and evening grosbeaks. Put out water and a 
bird box or two for shelter in inclement weather. 

Make the bird feeding portion of your garden 
attractive and provide winter shelter, food and nesting 
sites by planting fruit bearing trees and shrubs such 
as English, American and Chinese hollies, dogwoods 
in variety, native blueberries, serviceberries (Amelan- 
chier) flowering crabapples. many viburnums, snow- 
berry, bayberry and pyracantha. Pines, junipers and 
yews provide cover nesting sites. 

Books 

You may be playing host to more starlings, Eng- 
lish sparrows or squirrels than pleases you. How to 
deal with them effectively is covered in "Solving Your 
Bird Problems," a booklet sponsored by the Conserva- 
tion Council of Eastern Pennsylvania. This and nearly 
a hundred other vexing problems are answered in a 
practical and spirited manner. (Obtainable at the 
Horticultural Society, it sells for $.35. Proceeds go to 
the Washington Crossing Bird Banding Station.) 

The Society library contains many excellent books 
on birds. "Songbirds of America," in color, sound and 
story is tops in its field. Recorded, photographed and 
written by Drs. Arthur A. Allen and Peter P. Kellogg, 
with a foreword by Roger Tory Peterson, it is a book- 
album with a high fidelity record. As twenty four of 
the best loved birds of this area sing, you can study 
photographs of them in color, learn where they are 
found, their size, their habits, song, and you can learn 
a memory phrase to help recall each song. Advice is 
given on recording birdsongs. and photographing and 
attracting birds as well as other helpful information, 
such as a list of books and records. A more recent 
recording of bird songs is "A Field Guide to Bird 
Songs" by Roger Tory Peterson. More than 300 bird 
calls are announced by Dr. Allen. 

"A Field List of the Birds of the Delaware Valley" 
(1959 edition) is packed with concise, readable infor- 
mation. Published by the Delaware Valley Ornitho- 
logical Club, this booklet sells for $L0O and is available 
at the Academy of Natural Sciences. Good birding 
areas are listed as are the local clubs which sponsor 
field trips, lectures, conservation activities and welcome 
all visitors. 

Fine displays of regional birds may be seen at the 
Academy of Natural Sciences where they are mounted 
in their natural habitats. The Zoological Garden has 



PAST, PRESENT and FUTURE 

The oldest horticultural society in America found- 
ed in one of America's oldest cities — it goes without 
saying that the past of the Pennsylvania Horticultural 
Society has had its moments of glory. New and ex- 
citing plants were being discovered and lirought to 
our shores by leaders interested in horticulture. Some 
of these plants, for a time popular as conservatory and 
garden subjects, descended into obscurity, l:)Ut others, 
such as the poinsettia and sugar beet became import- 
ant to our nation not only for food and for pleasure, 
but as economic crops as well. None can deny that 
our founding fathers served American gardening well. 

Today the situation has changed. Plart importa- 
tions are severely restricted J^ecause of disease and 
insect problems. Collecting expeditions to remote 
regions are becoming increasingly expensive. In some 
ways this is an advantage, for such limitations have 
helped stimulate the production of new varieties at 
home. American plant Ijreeders. with tools of science, 
are now producing wonders in horticulture ; they are 
serving American gardening well. 

Although the character of the Society has changed 
greatly over this period of more than a century and 
a quarter, it is well to remind ourselves that its basic 
purpose remains unchanged ... to promote more and 
better horticulture throughout the state, and encovir- 
age conservation and civic planting. Certainly, this 
is our purpose now, and it is our responsibility to 
carry this credo into the future. 

We have in America today a greater number of 
people than ever who are becoming horticulturally 
conscious. There are the novices who are eager to 
learn how to turn their suburban backyards into gar- 
dens. There are those who have gardened for a good 
many years but are ever on the alert for fresh ideas 
and new methods. And there are the specialists, the 
much advanced, serious amateurs, who provide the 
horticultural leadership for others. To all of these the 
Horticultural Society can bring service : cultural facts, 
variety recommendations, design suggestions, plant 
source information, pest control guides, and a chance 
to participate in events and activities with others who 
are garden minded and in civic projects which call for 
horticultural skills and knowledge. 

Our challenge is to serve American gardening by 
meeting the needs of our times as well as did our 
founders who served it so exceeding well in the past. 

H. D. Mirick 
President 



a bird house beautifully planted for free flying birds 
and a lake where can be seen the largest collection 
in North America of pinioned water-fowl. Close by are 
plantings of many evergreens and deciduous trees and 
shrubs — including an excellent group of viburnums — 
especially selected to attract birds. 



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FEBRUARY 26 

DEADLINE for making entries in the Philadel- 
phia Flower Show HORTICULTURAL CLASSES 
for amateur growers. Consult your show schedule 
for rules and details. 

MARCH 7-12 Commercial Museum 

PHILADELPHIA FLOWER SHOW 
Monday 12 :00 - 10:00 P.M. 

Tuesday - Saturday 9 :00 A.M. - 10:00 P.M. 

Bubbling fountains and languid pools add a re- 
freshing note to the 1%0 Philadelphia Flower Show. 
Be sure to take advantage of your free member's ticket, 
and the opportunity to purchase up to ten special 
reduced rate tickets' at $1.25 each. These will be on 
sale in the office of the Society through Friday, March 
4. No tickets can be sold in the office after the Show 
opens. 

MARCH 8 Bellevue Stratford Hotel 

SPRING LUNCHEON 
Dr. K. C. Allen, Director of Kingwood Center, 
Mansfield. Ohio, will talk on the "Goals for Horti- 
cultural Organizations." Dr. Allen was Executive 
Secretary of the American Rose Society, President 
of the Men's Garden Clubs of America and has been 
active in many other horticultural organizations. He 
is the author of "Roses for Every Garden" and has a 
keen interest in the future of American horticulture. 



DATES to mark on your CALENDAR 

APRIL 20-21 - DAFFODIL EXHIBIT 

Philadelphia National Bank 



See next month's NEWS for details on the 
following : 

APRIL 10 - CITY GARDEN TOUR 

Sponsored by the Philadelphia 
Society of Little Gardens 
APRIL 10-15 - FLORALIA 

Philadelphia 

Sponsored by the Philadelphia More 

Beautiful Committee 



Broad & Chestnut Streets 

APRIL 30 - PLANT EXCHANGE 

Chestnut Hill 

MAY 7 - GARDEN VISITS 

Jenkintown, Rydal, Meadowbrook 

MAY 8 - AZALEA SUNDAY 

Pennsylvania Horticultural 
Society Azalea Garden 

MAY 19 - RITTENHOUSE FLOWER MART 

Sponsored by the Rittenhouse 
Square Flower Market for the 
benefit of Children's Charities. 

MAY 21 - GARDEN VISITS 

Haverford 

JUNE 5 - GARDEN VISITS 

Whitemarsh, Ambler, Gwynedd 
Valley 

(Unless otherwise indicated, activities listed are sponsored 
by The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society.) 



This is the first issue of what we hope 
will be many years of monthly bulletins from 
your Society. The purpose of the NEWS is 
to provide useful information to you. If you 
have any suggestions for ways in which this 
publication or any other activity of The 
Pennsylvania Horticultural Society can be of 
greater benefit to you as a member or to the 
community in general, please let us hear 
from you. 



THE PENNSYLVANIA 
HORTICULTURAL 



SOCIETY 



1617 PENNSYLVANIA BOULEVARD 
PHILADELPHIA 3, PENNSYLVANIA 




VOL I No. 2 



APRIL 1960 






•news 



PRUNE FLOWERING SHRUBS WITH A PURPOSE 



Like most rules, many of those applied to garden- 
ing are not infallible. The one stating that spring 
flowering trees and shrubs should be pruned only 
after flowering is a handy guide to the beginner, but 
as experience comes it is realized that this rule doesn't 
always make good sense. While before-bloom pruning 
removes flowers of such things as forsythia, flowering 
quince and similar shrubs, the few flowers lost hardly 
make a difference in the garden display unless radical 
pruning is being done. And if radical pruning is 
needed because of several years of neglect or mis- 
pruning perhaps it is just as well to give up the 
flowers for one season in order to do the job properly. 

In late winter or early spring it is easy to analyze 
the structural condition of trees and shrubs and to 
prune accordingly. The refuse is more readily dis- 
posed of without the great weight and bulk of foliage. 
Less damage is done to other plants in the garden 
when dragging out cut-off branches. It is easier to 
clean up thoroughly after the pruning job since scraps 
of branches and twigs fall to relatively bare ground 
before lawns, ground covers and flower beds begin 
growth, and since pruning is a job calling for a con- 




siderable amount of physical exertion, it is less diffi- 
cult in cool weather. 

Too often pruning is considered merely a mechan- 
ical technique. Actually, good pruning calls for an 
artist's respect for his medium ; in this case, trees 
and shrubs. The individual wielding the pruning 
implements must know his materials, not just the 
botanical names and the cultural requirements, but 
real knowledge of growth habits and the subtile com- 
bination of qualities which determine a plant's char- 
acter. A forsythia, for instance, is broad and fountain- 



like and is quite distinct from the more upright habit 
of lilac. Many minute character differences present 
themselves in the wide range of trees and shrubs 
growing in most gardens. 

Perhaps, because it is easy, the most popular 
pruning technique is to cut off all branches of a shrub 
at chest level, leaving a cluster of broom handles 
sticking into the air. After being cut back in this 
manner, a shrub sends forth great long shoots and 




soon resembles a giant shaving brush. In the second 
growing season, the bristles grow more bristles, be- 
come extremely crowded, and soon sag groundward. 
This plant has none of the inherent character which, 
even without man's assistance, it is capable of produc- 
ing. 

Basic Approach 

When pruning most deciduous flowering shrubs 
which tend to produce several stems from the ground, 
it is generally best to cut out older wood at or near 
the groundline and to do a minimum amount of top 
pruning. If a few of the oldest trunks are removed 
each year — maybe only one or two in less vigorous 
shrubs or several in the case of vigorous ones — the 
shrul) will always retain its natural character. It also 
will be possible to control overall size without ever 
having to resort to drastic pruning, and new growth 
will be stimulated to replace old, sparsely blooming 
wood. 

This basic technique can be varied enough to 
ol)tain different results as shown in the three panel 

(continued next page) 



PRUNING-(Continued) 

sketch of a lilac. The same shrub (and this applies 
to other kinds as well) can provide either graceful 
trunk lines with a high crown of foliage and flowers 
or a low dense mass, yet in both instances the pruning 
takes into consideration the inherent characteristics 
of the plant. 

It is possible to prune in this manner, forsythia, 
mock-orange (Philadelphus,), beauty-bush (Kolkwitzia), 
weigela, deutzia, flowering quince, shrub loniceras, 
shrubby dogwoods (Cornus stolonifera and similar 
ones), regel privet, common lilac and several of the 
other species (Syringa chinensis, S. villosa and others), 
most viburnums and many other shrubs. The only 
instances where caution is required is in the cases of 
hybrid lilacs which are grafted or budded onto com- 
mon lilac or privet rootstock, and fragrant viburnum 
(y. carlesii), the root stock of which is nannyberry 
(V. lentago). Even in these instances, however, it is 
possible to use the same basic technique as long as 
one is sure that all new growth comes from the desired 
variety and not from the rootstock. 

With dogwoods, crabapples and other flowering 
trees, it is important to maintain an airy, more or 
less open structure. Remove branches which cross 
and rub against other branches as shown below — this 
is a particularly bad habit of multi-trunked trees such 










as dogwood and magnolia. When pruning, leave and 
mark some branches which can be removed when in 
bloom and used indoors. 

In all top pruning, remove branches close to 
their point of origin as shown in the sketches. In 
this manner evidence of pruning is not noticeable and 
the inherent character of the plant is maintained at 
its best. 



WHERE TO SEE . . . 

. . . daffodils, peonies, lilacs, flowering crabapples? 
As a service to members, the NEWS will carry from 
time to time seasonal information about specialized 
plant collections which can be seen within a day's 
trip of Philadelphia. The approximate dates when 
collections are expected to be at their peak will be 
included where possible. 

Daffodils: (April 18-25 except where noted) 

• "Brier Edge", Mr. & Mrs. A. Gruber, 124 Lin- 
coln Terrace, JelTersonville 

• Drexel Lodge of Drexel Institute of Technol- 
ogy, Newtown Square 

• Scott Foundation, Swarthmore College Campus, 
Swarthmore 

• Tyler Arboretum, Lima 

• Charles Mueller Bulbs, New Hope (April 20- 
May 5) (also small bulbs, species and early 
hybrid tulips, April 1-15) 

Wildflowers: (April 15 -May 30) 

• Bowman's Hill State Wildflower Preserve, 
Washington Crossing State Park 

• Cloud Hill Nursery, Quakertown 

(also primulas, rock garden plants and alpines) 

CLASS 46: CHRYSANTHEMUM SHOW 

Requests for rooted chrysanthemum cuttings for 
Class 46 must be made in writing and received at the 
office of the PHS on or before Friday, April 22; reser- 
vations will be made in the order received for the 
first fifty individuals to do so. There is no charge 
for the cuttings, but they must be picked up from 
William Weber, (Erdenheim Farms, Philadelphia, 18) 
between May 1-15. Cuttings cannot be mailed or 
delivered. 

The three rooted cuttings which each exhibitor 
receives must be grown as disbudded bush plants, 
each in an eight inch pot. The variety will not be 
revealed to the exhibitor and everyone obtaining cut- 
tings is required to show all surviving plants at the 
Chrysanthemum Show, October 21-23. 

It is suggested that the last pinch be made on or 
about August 1st. Growers are allowed to protect 
plants from frost. 

First prize, for the best three-plant entry is 
$15.00. The David Leslie Poe Memorial Award is 
given to an exhibitor winning first place for three 
years. Ten and five dollar awards are made to second 
and third place entries, and a special award is provided 
for the best single plant. 



LIBRARY SUGGESTIONS 



GARDEN VISITS 



SOME ADDITIONS TO THE LIBRARY ARE: 

Your Lawn; How to Make It and Keep It by R. 

Milton Carleton (Van Nostrand, 1959) 

A matter-of-fact, no nonsense approach to de- 
veloping' and maintaining a beautiful lawn. Up-to- 
date, efficient planting and maintenance methods 
are presented in easy to read, clearly understand- 
able language, and except for a few details the 
information is generally applicable to this area. 
Evergreens for Every State by Katharine M-P. Cloud 
(Chilton, 1960) 

This book, by a Philadelphian and member of 
the Society, presents much valuable information 
on selecting evergreens for many localities, and 
includes landscape uses of both broadleaf and 
needletype evergreens as well as strictly cultural 
information. 

Camellias for Everyone by Claude Chidamian 
(Doubleday, 1959). 

Camellias described in a way all can under- 
stand: history, varieties, culture and propagation 
are covered thoroughly. Several line drawings 
help make clear various cultural techniques, and 
the many photographs of camellias in color add 
to the usefulness and attractiveness of this book. 

Story of the Plant Kingdom by Merle C. Coulter, 
revised by Howard J. Dittmer. (Univ. of Chicago 
Press, 1959). 

An introduction to the workings of the plant 
world and the study of botany for the serious 
amateur and student of plants and how they grow. 

Garden Ideas and Projects edited by Richard D. 
Whittemore (Doubleday, 1959) 

A handbook for home gardeners with illustra- 
tions and easy-to-follow instructions for planning 
and building many kinds of gardens. It answers 
many of the beginner's gardening questions clear- 
ly and points out several of the pitfalls which 
should be avoided. 

Peonies, Outdoors and In by Arno and Irene Nehrling 
(Hearthside, 1960) 

How to select, grow and enjoy peonies is pre- 
sented in complete detail for amateur or connois- 
seur. There is even a chapter on staging and com- 
peting in peony shows. A list of retail sources 
and one of registered varieties should prove very 
useful. 

The Complete Book of Flowers and Plants for Interior 
Decoration by Esther Wheeler and Anabel Lasker 
(Hearthside, 1957) 

Detailed instructions and step-by-step illustra- 
tions tell how to use flowers and containers to 
achieve individuality in all types of home settings. 



These are the gardens which will be open to 
MEMBERS of the PHS and their guests for the May 
Garden Visits. Detailed instructions for reaching each 
garden will be included in next month's NEWS. 

Remember, your membership card is your ticket 
of admission; a charge of $1.00 is made for guests. 

SATURDAY, MAY 7 

Mr. & Mrs. Lessing J. Rosenwald, "Alverthorpe," 
(Jenkintown). A spring garden; inviting paths lead 
through wooded areas containing an extensive collec- 
tion of unusual trees and shrubs and many wildflowers. 

Mr. & Mrs. Walter Dannenbaum, (Rydal). Dog- 
woods, azaleas and wildflowers in the woods provide 
spring bloom. The greenhouse provides many varieties 
of winter cutflowers. 

Mr. & Mrs. J. Liddon Pennock, "MeadowI)rook 
Farm," (Meadowbrook). A terraced hillside of gar- 
dens rich in hollies, camellias and other choice plants. 

Mr. & Mrs. George Austin Arrington, "Tranquil- 
ity" (Huntingdon Valley). All work has been done 
by the owners ; includes azaleas, wildflowers. and a 
greenhouse attached to the living room. 

SATURDAY, MAY 21 

Mrs. William White, (Haverford). A two-year 
old garden constructed within an old garage founda- 
tion, a curved terrace overlooks a ravine woodland 
with wildflowers. 

Dr. & Mrs. Paul Havens, (Haverford). An all 
white garden in three terraces with fountains and 
pools and many old trees. The attached greenhouse 
will be open to visitors. 

Mr. & Mrs. Henry W. Breyer, Jr., "Cobble Court" 
(Haverford) Forty acres including an orchard, large 
old elms, old boxwoods and a new woodland garden. 

Mr. & Mrs. G. Ruhland Rebman, Jr., (Gladwyne). 
A three year old garden, includes vegetables, peren- 
nials and many plants chosen for attracting birds. 

Mr. & Mrs. Francis H. Scheetz, "Old Gulph 
House," (Gladwyne). Several hillside walled terraces 
and gardens with pools, integrated by intimate paths 
and including a wide selection of broad leaf evergreens. 



BUS RESERVATION BLANK 

GARDEN VISITS 

Please check □ May 7 Q May 21 

($1.50 each day) 
Application, with payment, must reach the 
Pennsylvania Horticultural Society, 389 Sub- 
urban Station Building, Philadelphia 3, at 
least one week before date of event. 



Name 

Address „ 



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DATES to mark on 

APRIL 10 2-5 P.M. 

CITY GARDEN TOUR 

Sponsored by the Philadelphia 
Society of Little Gardens 

All gardens are along 21st Street between 17th 
Street and Delancey and are within walking distance 
of each other. 

Tickets will be available at any of the gardens 
on the day of the event. Single admission $1.50; 
group tickets in blocks of ten for $10.00. For addi- 
tional information phone Mrs. Halsey Manning, 
Chairman. LO 7-6719. 

APRIL 10-15 

FLORALIA 

Philadelphia salutes spring with floral displays 
in stores and other places of business in center city. 
Sponsored by the Philadelphia More 
Beautiful Committee 

APRIL 30 9:30 A. M. 

PLANT EXCHANGE 

In the barn at the Frederic Ballard, Jr. residence. 
Northwestern .\ve. and Thomas Rd., Chestnut Hill. 

All plants for exchange must be received 
before 9:30 A.M. 

Bartering begins at 10:00 A. M. 

More emphasis will be placed on quality this year. 
All unlabeled or questionable plants will go into a 
Bargain Basement ; anyone bringing in only Bargain 
Basement material will be able to trade only there. 
In order to be eligible for bartering in the Connois- 
seur's Corner you must provide quality plants for 
that department. Plants of good quality but not of 
unusual merit will earn points for "main floor" trading. 



your CALENDAR 

APRIL 20-21 

DAFFODIL SHOW 

Wednesday 1:00 - 7:30 P.M. 

Thursday 9:'30 A.M. - 5:00 P.M. 

Philadelphia National Bank, 

Broad and Chestnut Streets. 

Schedules will be mailed to all who exhibited at 

the daffodil show in the past three years. Anyone 

else wishing a schedule may obtain one by writing 

or telephoning the PHS (LO 3-8352). 

See next month's NEWS for details on the following: 

iMAY 7-GARDEN VISITS 

Jenkintown, Rydal, Meadowbrook 

MAY 8-AZALEA SUNDAY 

Pennsylvania Horticultural Society 
Azalea Garden 

MAY 10-ANNUAL PLANT SALE 

Ambler Junior College of 

Temple University 
MAY 19-RITTENHOUSE FLOWER MART 

Sponsored by the Rittenhouse Square 

Flower Market for the benefit of 

Children's Charities. 
MAY 21 -GARDEN VISITS 

Haverford 
JUNE 5-GARDEN VISITS 

\\' hitemarsh. Ambler, 

Gvvynedd Valley 

(Unless otherwise indicated, activities listed are sponsored 
by The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society.) 



FLORiADE: 

The International Horticultural Exposition 
Rotterdam. Holland, March 25-Sept. 25, 1960 
... be sure to see the PHS exhibits, both 
indoors and out. 



THE PENNSYLVANIA 
HORTICULTURAL 



SOCIE- 



W PENNSYLVANIA BOULEVARD 
pLADELPHIA 3. PENNSYLVANIA 




VOL. i No. 3 



J^ffO MARt» 



I 



BULB FOLIAGE IS FOOD FACTORY 



The importance of the role played by the foliage 
of bulbs becomes evident when it is realized that the 
flower bud of some kinds is formed more than a year 
before flowering. At the time of this year's daflfodil 
flower, for instance, next year's bud is so far advanced 
in its development that it is possible to remove it 
from the bulb, dissect it and recognize some of the 
flower parts. Throughout the next twelve months, 
the bud continues to grow ; for nourishment it depends 
upon the foods stored in the bulb. To guarantee a 
plentiful supply of these stored foods it is necessary to 
keep foliage in growing condition as long as possible. 

Carbon dioxide and water combine within the 
leaves, with the help of sunlight and chlorophyll to 
form carbohydrates — sugars and starches. This man- 
ufacturing process is constant as long as sunlight is 
present and continues as long as the foliage remains 
green. The carbohydrates are transported to the bulb 
for storage and use by the bud during the long 
months of late summer, autumn and winter when no 
leaves are present. It is logical then, that the longer 
the period that foliage is green (in production) the 
greater the amount of carbohydrates stored and the 
better the quality and size of next year's flower. 

Since seeds are also starch storing structures 
(to nourish an embryo instead of a bud) their develop- 
ment allows a large quantity of carbohydrate to be 
wasted which otherwise would be stored in the bulb, 
so remove all flowers of daffodils, tulips, lilies and 
other bulbous plants as soon as they fade. With daffo- 
dds it is best to remove only the spent flower since 
the stem is leaf like in structure and it, too, produces 
vital carbohydrates. In fact, it has been proven ex- 
perimentally that daffodil bulbs on which flower stems 
remain weigh more (contain more carbohydrate) than 
those on which the flower stems are removed with the 
old flower. 

Tulips are less awkward after flowering if the 
stem is cut off just above the uppermost leaf. This 
sacrifices some green, food producing tissue but is 
necessary for the sake of appearance. The formation 
of seed pods on lilies can be prevented by cutting off 
the individual old flowers or the whole cluster just 
below the lowest flower stems, depending somewhat 




on the manner in which flowers are borne. 

Spring bulb foliage is soon hidden by annuals, 
perennials and other plants. Where it is conspicuous, 
it can be removed gradually as it turns yellow, but 
tall lily stalks are less easily hidden. For this reason 
it is well to plant tall growing, late flowering peren- 
nials nearby to conceal the lily stalks. If lilies are 
planted against a woodsy back- 
ground, however, the stalks 
are much less conspicuous than 
when grown in a formalized 
site. In fact, lilies seem to be- 
long to such a situation, where 
flowers might catch the sun- 
light but the background is 
shadowy and cool. 

While controlled experiment- 
al conditions differ from home 
garden conditions, and the dif- 
ference in daffodils between 
those in which the flower stem 
is removed and where it is 
allowed to remain might hard- 
ly be measurable, it is well to 
be aware of these growth fac- 
tors. When cutting choice 
daffodils, for instance, take 
only the stem with the flower; 
gather a leaf or two from an- 
other bulb where the flower is 
not taken. In general, use the 
same discretion when cutting 
flowers of any bulbous plant. 
When long stems are wanted for cutting, grow bulbs 
especially for that purpose and don't expect them to 
produce more than one season's bloom. 

Top dress all bulbs with an all purpose fertilizer 
(5-10-10) just after growth shows, as a general garden 
practice. While excessive nitrogen stimulates the 
growth of the basal rot condition in daffodils, it is not 
serious in the north. Also be sure that spring flower- 
ing bulbs get enough moisture during the foliage 
ripening period, especially in naturalized plantings 
where trees and shrubs compete for water. 



OFFICERS AND EXECUTIVE COUNCIL 

Pennsylvania Horticultural Society 



President 

Vice-Presidents 

Dr. J. Franklin Styer 

Secretary 
Treasurer 
Assistant Treasurer 



Henry D. Mirick 

Mrs. Charles Piatt 
R. Gwynne Stout 

Mrs. E. Page Allinson 

John G. Williams 

Carroll R. Wetzel 



Executive Council 

Mrs. E. Page Allinson Mrs. G. Ruhland Rebmann, Jr. 



Charles Becker, Jr. 
Mrs. Henry W. Breyer, Jr. 
W. Atlee Burpee, Jr. 
Dr. Jtfhn B. Carson 
Mrs. John B. Carson 
George R. Clark 
Mrs. Van Horn Ely 
Dr. John M. Fogg, Jr. 
George W. Furness 
Henry D. Mirick 
Frederick W. G. Peck 
J Liddon Pennock, Jr. 
Mrs. Charles Piatt 
Mrs. J. Pancoast Reath 



Mrs. Walter Rebmann 
Mrs. Francis H. Scheetz 
Richard H. L. Sexton 
Miss Estelle L. Sharp 
Mrs. Ralph T. Starr 
R. Gwynne Stout 
Dr. J. Franklin Styer 
Joseph B. Townsend, Jr. 
William H. Weber 
Carroll R. Wetzel 
John G. Williams 
Mrs. Harry Wood 
Mrs. Richard D. Wood, Jr. 



FRUITS OF MEMBERSHIP 

Have you seen the new Fruits of Membership 
leaflet which lists the many benefits of membership 
in the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society? Besides 
those listed, membership also provides the opportunity 
to give emphasis to the role of horticulture and gar- 
dening in everyday living. Through membership in 
the Society, everyone interested has the chance to 
support the cause, from city beautification to window- 
sill gardening. 

Don't you have a friend who should be a member, 
too? 

For copies of Fruits of Membership, telephone 
LO 3-8352, or drop a card to 389 Suburban Station ; 
we'll mail them immediately to you or to anyone 
for whom you request a copy. 

P. S. If you know someone who was once a 
member but is not at this time, ask them if they have 
seen the NEWS. A few back copies are available 
upon request. 



WHERE TO SEE . . . 

. . . springtime reach its climax with the full 
glory of May. So plentiful is the bounty that it is 
difficult to list the horticultural points of interest 
without a certain amount of overlapping. Except where 
indicated, the following will be at their best in the 
first half of May. 

Magnolias (late April) 

• Arthur Hoyt Scott Foundation, Swarthmore 
College Campus, Swarthmore. 

Iris 

• Drexel Lodge of Drexel Institute of Tech- 
nology, Newtown Square. 

Lilacs 

• Scott Foundation, Swarthmore. 

• Tyler Arboretum, Lima. 

Flowering Crabapples 

• Scott Foundation, Swarthmore. 

Flowering Japanese Cherries 

• Morris Arboretum, Chestnut Hill 
(new collection) 

• Fairmount Park - East River Dr. 

Alpines, rock garden plants 

• Morris Arboretum, Chestnut Hill. 

• Glendinning Rock Garden 

Fairmount Park - Girard Ave. & East River Dr. 

• "Krisheim", Mrs. George Woodward, 
McCallum St. & Mermaid Lane, Chestnut Hill. 

Japanese Garden 

• Japanese Exhibition House, Fairmount Park — 
Belmont Ave. & Lansdowne Dr. 

Azaleas and hybrid rhododendrons 

(continuing into late May) 

• Scott Foundation, Swarthmore. 

• Pennsylvania Horticultural Society 
Azalea Garden, Fairmount Park — 
Art Museum -Boat House Row. 

Peonies (May 20 -June 5) 

• Scott Foundation, Swarthmore. 

• Styer's Nurseries, (annual display), 
Rt. 1, Concordville. 

"A" DAY — special open house at National 
Agricultural College, April 30- May 1. 
Doylestown, Pa. 

Saturday 8 A.M. -5 P.M. 
Sunday 12 Noon - 5 P.M. 



LIBRARY SUGGESTIONS 

Field Guide to Trees and Shrubs by George A. 
Petrides. (Houghton-Mifflin Co., 1958) 

Trees, shrubs and vines of N. E. and N. Central 
U. S. and part of Canada can be readily identified 
with this manual. Especially useful is the section 
which compares similar plants and gives con- 
trasting characteristics. Twelve pages of silhou- 
ettes, which are often sought but seldom found, 
will also be helpful. 

Chromosome Atlas of Flowering Plants by C. D. 
Darlington and A. P. Wylie. (George Allan & 
Unwin Ltd., [Macmillan], 1955.) 

In this latest edition thousands of flowering 
plants are listed with their chromosome numbers 
— vital information for the serious plant hybri- 
dizer. Popular names are given as well as 
scientific. 

Garden Design by Sylvia Crowe. (Hearthside, 1958) 

The history of gardens through the ages and 
in various countries, principles of garden design 
for the reader to follow, materials to use and 
specific types of gardens are treated in this en- 
gaging description of how everyone can attain 
self-expression and an escape from the world to 
a peaceful spot of his own in a garden. 

The Gardens in the Royal Park at Windsor by 
Lanning Roper (Doubleday, 1959) 

Full color, black and white illustrations and 
very enjoyable text detail the history of these 
gardens and much about the marvelous plant 
collections. The author, who visited the gardens 
weekly over a period of several years, writes of 
things as he saw them and also as those in charge 
envision. Delightful anecdotes about those who 
started it all — King George VI and the Queen 
Mother Elizabeth — add much charm to this 
account. 

New Complete Book of Flower Arrangement by F. F. 
Rockwell and Esther C. Grayson (Doubleday, 
1960) 

An enlarged and revised edition of the book by 
the same title includes the history of flower ar- 
ranging, the art and types of arrangements and 
detailed information on exhibiting and how the 
judges will score. Illustrations in sketch form, 
black and white and full color add much to enable 
the reader to follow easily what the authors out- 
line. 



GARDEN VISITS 

These are the gardens which will be open to 
MEMBERS of the P.H.S. and their guests on June 5. 
An innovation this year is a Sunday garden visit to 
take advantage of the early evening hours, (3-7 P.M.), 
which are often choicest of the garden day. 

SUNDAY, JUNE 5 

Mr. & Mrs. Nicholas G. Roosevelt, "The High- 
lands," (Ambler). A spacious old garden containing 
surprises at every turn : old boxwood hedges, ancient 
walls, roses, sculpture, a shady grotto. Many large 
plants in containers used on terrace. 

Mr. & Mrs. Orville H. Bullitt, "Oxmoor," (White- 
marsh). Three gardens, each complete in itself one a 
completely enclosed all green garden the other two 
overlooking rolling pastures. Roses, perennials, cor- 
don pears, large garden shelter. 

Mr. & Mrs. James Cheston, "Dawesfield," (Am- 
bler). A very old perennial garden with a wall and 
garden house dating from about 1800. Extensive 
magnolia collection ; pit greenhouse is a converted 
ice-house ; new lath-house for begonias and other 
shade plants. 

Mr. & Mrs. James C. Homer, (Gwynedd Val- 
ley). A small country garden in which all work is 
done by the owners. Overlooks a woodland and fea- 
tures perennials and annuals in abundance. 

Mr. & Mrs. James Bush-Brown, "Quarry Farm," 
(Ambler). A boxwood garden carries out the spirit 
of the oldest portion of the house (1716) ; a walled 
studio garden features hanging fuchsias and tuberous 
begonias. Potting shed, shade house, cutting garden. 



On May 7 and 21, buses will leave 1617 Pennsyl- 
vania Blvd. at 12:15 P.M. On Sunday, June 5, buses 
will leave at 2:15 P.M. 



BUS RESERVATION BLANK 
GARDEN VISITS 

Please check D May 7 D May 21 
($1.50 each day) [J June 5 

Application, with payment, must reach the 
Pennsylvania Horticultural Society, 389 Sub- 
urban Station Building, Philadelphia 3, at 
least one week before date of event. 



Name 

Address 



Clip This Corner and Mail 



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sainoii siisiA nbg^ivo • 



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DATES to mark 

APRIL 30 9 A. M. 

PLANT EXCHANGE 

In the barn at the Frederic Ballard, Jr. residence. 
Northwestern Ave. and Thomas Rd., Chestnut Hill. 

All plants for exchange must be received 
before 9:30 A.M. 

Bartering begins at 10:00 A.M. 

More emphasis will be placed on quality this year. 
All unlabeled or questionable plants will go into a 
Bargain Basement; anyone bringing in only Bargain 
Basement material will be able to trade only there. 
In order to be eligible for bartering in the Connois- 
seur's Corner you must provide quality plants for 
that department. Plants of good quality but not of 
unusual merit will earn points for "main floor" trading. 

MAY 8 11 A. M. - 5 P.M. 

AZALEA DAY 

P. H. S. Azalea Garden 
Fairmount Park 
To help celebrate the 'growing up' of the Azalea 
Garden which the Society gave to the City of Phila- 
delphia five years ago, this special day has been chosen 
to call attention to the garden. The over two thousand 
plants should be at their peak of bloom. A new Guide 
to the Azalea Garden will be given out, and attendants 
will be on duty in the garden during the hours indi- 
cated above to answer questions about growing 
azaleas. It happens also to be Mother's Day . . . bring 
her to see the garden too ! 

MAY 10 10 A.M. - 4 P.M. 

SPRING PLANT SALE 

Ambler Junior College of Temple University 
Annuals and perennials in special varieties and 
colors ; herbs, foliage, and flowering plants, shrubs, 
vegetables. (Rain date, Wednesday, May 11) 



on your CALENDAR 

MAY 19 ALL DAY 

RIHENHOUSE SQUARE FLOWER MARKET 

Rittenhouse Square 
An annual event in Philadelphia now celebrating 
its forty-sixth year. Sponsored by the Rittenhouse 
Square Flower Market Association for the benefit of 
Children's Charities. 

MAY 7 1-5 P.M. 

GARDEN VISITS 

Jenkintown, Rydal, Meadowbrook 

The gardens of Mr. & Mrs. Lessing J. Rosenwald, 

Mr. & Mrs. Walter Dannenbaum, Mr. & Mrs. J. 

Liddon Pennock, Jr., and Mr. & Mrs. George Austin 

Arring^on. (For garden details see April NEWS) 

MAY 21 1-5 P.M. 

Haverford, Gladwyne 

The gardens of Mrs. William White, Dr. & Mrs. 
Paul Havens, Mr. & Mrs. Henry W. Breyer, Jr., Mr. 
& Mrs. G. Ruhland Rebmann, Jr., and Mr. & Mrs. 
Francis H. Scheetz. (For details see April NEWS) 

JUNE 5 3 ■ 7 P.M. 

Whitemarsh, Ambler, Gwynedd Valley 
(See preceeding page for details) 

Your membership card is your ticket of admission 
to each garden. Guests of members are admitted to 
all gardens for the day upon payment of $1.00 for 
guest ticket at first garden visited. 

Gardens will be opened irrespective of weather 
on dates scheduled ; they will not be opened on other 
days in case of rain. 

The enclosed sheet contains route information for 
reaching gardens on all three Garden Visit Days: 
May 7, 21 and June 5. 



SOCIETY 



1617 PENNSYLVANIA 
PHILADELPHIA 3. PENNSYLVAh 




VOL. I No. 4 



news 



PESTICIDES FOR TODAY'S GARDEN 



Each year the problem of controlling garden 
pests seems to become more complex because of the 
great array of products appearing on the market. It 
is true that modern science has given us several new 
materials with which to combat the insects and 
diseases of plants, but it is also true that a given 
material may appear under five or six trade names 
which give little indication of the actual contents of 
the package. It is unfortunate that such Madison 
.Avenue influence has invaded the field of garden 
products because gardeners depend upon a material 
to do a job, not upon a glamorous label or catchy 
name. One or two manufacturers of pest control 
products still print the name of materials in large 
letters, some even larger than their own brand name ; 
they deserve high commendation. In any case, train 
yourself to read the fine print on all labels. 

Even with the many new materials now in use 
it still is possible to carry out a complete pest control 
program with relatively few of them. The list below 
includes some of the basic, broad spectrum pesticides 
which are capable of controlling a wide range of 
insects or diseases. It also contains several specifics 
which control only one pest. These are necessary 
not only because they are more effective but also 
because excessive use of a broad spectrum material 
destroys beneficial organisms as well as harmful 
ones. (Such is the case of DDT: red spider mite was 
not jjarticularly troublesome in the garden until DDT 
killed oft" its natural predators while not killing the 
mites; this gave them a free field in which to multiply.) 



INSECTICIDES 

Malathion is probably the best all-around insecti- 
cide for today's garden. Its wide range of eft'ectiveness 
and relative safety render it extremely valuable in the 
home garden, Malathion is less ttjxic to humans than 
DDT and while Methoxychlor is even lower on the 
toxicity scale, it doesn't control as many insect i)ests. 
Perhaps the worst characteristic of Malathion is its 
odor, but consider this an advantage for it constantly 
reminds us that we must treat the material with 



respect, a fact true of all pesticides. 

On ornamentals, Malathion controls aphids, 
beetles, mealybug, soft (cottony) scales, hard scales 
(in the crawling stage), leaf-hoppers, bag-worms, 
lacebugs, white fly, most bugs and some caterpillars. 
It is not reliably effective as a miticide (see below) 
and in some instances has not given the control needed. 

Malathion can also be used for general insect 
control in the vegetable garden up to a week before 
harvesting any crop on which it has been used. 

DDT is still needed on the pest control shelf 
for battling a wide range of very destructive cater- 
pillars. It is also the best material for controlling 
borers in dogwood, lilac and iris because it gives 
long period protection. Eor thrips in gladiolus it is 
valued as a summer spray and for dusting the corms 
to prevent the overwintering of this pest in storage. 
A protective coat of DDT kills the female stage of 
leaf miner when she tries to deposit her egg within 
the leaf tissues of holly and boxwood. 

Because mites (red spider, spider mites) are so 
troublesome in today's garden, it is essential to be 
prepared with a miticide. There are several on the 
market : Aramite, Dimite, Kelthane, Ovex and Tedion. 
Kelthane is safe for all plants including food plants; 
some of the others are used on tree fruits. Aramite, 
however, should not be used on any food plants. 
There is some indication that mites become resistant 
to a given material if it is used repeatedly, so it may 
be necessary to vary the miticide used where infesta- 
tions have been heavy or threaten to be so. It takes 
an alert gardener to catch mites before they do ex- 
cessive damage to woody ornamentals ; they are cap- 
able of virtually wiping out a hemlock hedge if they 
go un-noticed. The minute mites are suspected, spray 
with one of the above materials. 

Chlordane is most useful for controlling grubs 
and ants, cutworms and other soil insects, including 
Japanese beetle grubs. It is also, indirectly, a control 
for moles, since it kills the grubs upon which the 
moles feed and thereby removes their source of food. 

(cont'd next page) 



PESTICIDES-(Cont'd) 

Lindane is recommended for controlling root 
aphids and other soil insects of house plants and is 
perhaps more effective than DDT or Malathion for 
controlling birch leaf miner. It is also used for eradi- 
cating sudden infestations of thrips, particularly when 
flowers are present, since it leaves practically no 
visible residue. 

Dormant (miscible) oil provides the weapon with 
which to destroy scales in their hard shell period. 
It must be applied before growth starts in spring. 

Metaldehyde-calcium arsenate baits are needed 
to kill slugs and snails which can devour enormous 
portions of prized plants, unseen, at night 

Many combination sprays and dusts are available 
at garden supply centers which bring together two 
or more of the above materials. Several also combine 
one or more insecticides (usually a broad spectrum 
one such as Malathion and a miticide) with one of 
the fungicides listed below. 

FUNGICIDES 

Captan is the most generally available, nearly all- 
purpose fungicide. Alone or in combination with 
other materials, it protects plants from a wide variety 
of leaf spots, blights and rots and is a very safe to use. 

Zineb (Parzate, Dithane 78) is similar to Captan 
in controlling many plant diseases and is also com- 
bined with other pest control materials in both sprays 
and dusts. 

Phaltan is one of the newer fungicides which has 
met with rather spectacular results in controlling 
blackspot of roses. While in some tests Manzate gave 
an even higher degree of blackspot control, Phaltan 
has the advantage of also controlling mildew — 
important in the late summer humidity of eastern 
Pennsylvania. 

Fungus diseases of turf are becoming more prom- 
inent and often cause desirable grasses to go dormant 
prematurely. This, of course, only makes more space 
for crabgrass. Acti-dione RZ has given best control 
of turf diseases such as dollar spot and brown patch 
as reported by users in this area. 

Mildewcides are materials specifically for the 
control of mildew which so badly disfigures phlox, 
zinnias, lilacs and many other garden plants. While 
sulfur has long been in use, it has limitations. A high 
degree of control is being achieved with two relatively 
new products : Karathane and Acti-dione P.M. 

Other pesticides are on the market, of course ; 
those listed are generally available and make up a 
fairly complete control kit. Specifics for less common 
troubles than mildew and mites have not been included. 



DIRECTOR PUBLISHES BOOK 

A fresh approach to the organization of small 
home landscapes is presented in a book published this 
month by Henry Holt & Co., New York. The book, 
Budget Landscaping, is authored by Carlton B. Lees, 
Director of our Society. Based on a course which 
Mr. Lees established at Kingwood Center, Mansfield, 
Ohio, the book includes case histories of many gar- 
dens worked out in class over a period of five and a 
half years. Written especially for people who live 
on average city and suburban lots. Budget Land- 
scaping contains hundreds of ideas for beautifying 
everyday surroundings, designed within a framework 
of limited funds and limited space and tailored to 
meet the needs of the average active family. 

New perhaps to the novice at garden making, is 
the concept that good landscape design is a three 
dimensional composition viewed by man from within 
as opposed to design in painting and sculpture where 
the observer is quite apart from the composition. 




What do you see as you stand in your back yard 
and slowly pivot through all points of the compass? 
Questions such as this and many others help the 
home owner to analyze his landscape and improve 
its design. The chapters devoted to materials, organ- 
ization of the front and back yards and the appendix 
listing helpful books ... all add up to what we feel 
will be a very useful book for people anywhere who 
wish to build a new garden or want to rebuild an 
old one. 

Budget Landscaping has been selected by the 
Garden Guild as its June offering to their mem]>ers. 

Henry D. Mirick 
President 



LIBRARY SUGGESTIONS 

Exotica II 

by Alfred B. Graf (Roehrs Company. 1959) 

Sub-titled "Pictorial Cyclopedia of Indoor 
Plants, 7600 Illustrations with Guide to Care of 
House Plants, 231 Plants in Color." 

The material of Exotica I has been augmented 
and revised both in text and illustrations although 
the general format is the same. 

Design with Flowers . . . Unlimited 

by Patricia Kroh (Doubleday, 1959) 

Principles of floral design are set forth with 
accompanying illustrations. Detailed information 
on making and choosing containers and using 
them to best advantage. 

American Rose Annual 1960 

by the American Rose Society (Society, 1960) 

Useful, up-to-the minute information by leading 
rosarians on growing exhibition roses, fungicide 
and insecticide tests, nematodes, old shrub roses 
and other related subjects. 



P.H.S. AUTHORS 

The Society proudly counts among its members 
a number of authors. Some who have written books 
on gardening and related subjects in recent years are : 

Ernesta Drinker Ballard, James Bush-Brown, 
Louise Bush-Brown, Emily Read Cheston, Katharine 
M-P. Cloud, John M. Fogg, Jr., Mary G. Henry. 
Doretta Klaber, Carlton B. Lees, Charles Mueller, 
Richard Thomson, John C. Wister, and Anne 
Wertsner Wood. 

Illustrators of books and articles are Dorothy 
Falcon Piatt and Leonie Bell. 

Pamphlets and articles too numerous to mention 
have been written by many others. 

One of the services of the Library is to stand 
read}' to offer help to authors of garden books and 
articles — and to all our members whatever their needs 
may be. 



WHEN YOU BUY GARDEN BOOKS 

. . . purchase them through ihe Society by 
contacting the Liljrarian or l)y calling National 
Council Books, Inc. (GE 8-8263) Be sure to mention 
your membership) in P.H.S. — 10% of the ])rice paid 
for the books will be given to the Society Library. 



WHERE TO SEE . . . 

... as May wanes, lush color goes with it and 
the garden settles down to more peaceful, quieter 
display. June is a month of fragrant roses and 
brilliant new lilies. 
Rose Gardens 

• Morris Arboretum, Chestnut Hill. 

• Robert Pyle Memorial Garden, Swarthmore 
College Campus, Swarthmore. 

• Hershey Rose Garden, Hershey. 

• Breeze Hill Gardens, 2101 Bellevue Road, 
Harrisburg 

• Conard-Pyle Co., West Grove 
Lilies 

• Longwood Gardens, Kennett Square. 



Addition . . , 

to complete the list of Council members 
of The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society 
which was printed in last rr^onth's issue, add 
the name of Mrs. Edward L. Elliot. 



RABBIT CONTROL SURVEY . . . 

There seem to be as many methods for controlling 
rabbits as there are gardeners who have succeeded. 
Old wives tales, signs of the Zodiac, whistling coke 
bottles, tinkling tin and all sorts of devices and 
materials, orthodox and unorthodox, are reported. 
Perhaps it is because of sheer desperation. 

We'd like to know what method you use to con- 
trol rabbits. What materials, how often, what degree 
of success (or absence thereof) — report your exper- 
iences in this department of gardening to the NEWS. 
The information will be tabulated and a report made 
in a future issue. If a commercial product is used, 
please give the brand name and source. 



BUS RESERVATION BLANK 
GARDEN VISITS 

Sunday, June 5 

Application, with payment, ($1.50) must 
reach the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society, 
389 Suburban Station Building, Philadelphia 
3, at least one week before date of event. 



Name 

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DATES to mark 

3 - 7 P. M. 
GARDEN VISITS 

Whitemarsh, Ambler, Gwynedd Valley 

The gardens of Mr. and Mrs. Nicholas G. Roose- 
velt, Mr. and Mrs. Orville H. Bullitt, Mr. and Mrs. 
James Cheston, Mr. and Mrs. James C. Hornor and 
Mr. and Mrs. James Bush-Brown will be open on a 
Sunday afternoon for your pleasure as a Member of 
the Society, and for your guests. 

See reverse side for bus reservation blank (buses 
will leave 1617 Pennsylvania Blvd. at 2:15 P.M. on 
Sunday, June 5). 

JUNE 8-9 10 A.M. -6 P. M 

ROSES ON PARADE 

389 Suburban Station Building 

An exhibition of roses and rose arrangements. 
Varieties will be named for your information. 

SUMMER 1960 

FLORIADE 

The International Horticultural Exposition 
Rotterdam, Holland 

The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society is one 
of the many horticultural organizations from all over 
the world which has contributed an exhibit to the 
1960 FLORIADE. Our portion consists of two parts: 
an outdoor planting of native American shrubs which 
are used in European gardens and an indoor photo- 
graphic panel exhibit of some American trees which 
are used in European parks and gardens. 

Floriade opened on March 25 and closes on 
September 25, 1960. 



on your CALENDAR 

GARDEN CLINICS 

A new service to memljers of the Pennsylvania 
Horticultural Society will be launched in August 
when the first of what is hoped will be a great number 
of Garden Clinics will be given on Lawn Care. The 
Garden Clinics program has been designed to give 
first hand information on a wide variety of topics to 
Members. Already planned for the fall and winter, 
besides the Lawn Care Clinics, are sessions on Bulbs, 
Soils and Gardening Indoors. There are many topics 
planned for the future; it is hoped that more sug- 
gestions will come from Members. 



Designed as laboratory-like sessions, each clinic 
will be open to a limited number of individuals, de- 
pending somewhat on the topic. While a lawn care I 
clinic might handle up to thirty Members, one onl 
plant breeding would be limited to maybe only six 
or eight so each person attending could actually try 
his or her hnnd at the necessary techniques. To con- 
trol the number of individuals attending each session 
and to assure that no one will be left out because of 
another person's absence, a registration fee of one 
dollar will be charged for each clinic. Registrations 
will be made by mail in the order received. 

Watch for definite topic and date announcements 
in future issues of the NEWS. 



CHRYSANTHEMUM SHOW 

. . . schedules are being mailed to 
exhibitors of chrysanthemums in recent 
shows and are available upon rec|uest to 
anyone interested in exhibiting in this year's 
sho\\-. Phone or write the Society for your 
co])y. 



THE PENNSYLVANIA 
SOCIETY 


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PANSIES TO BE FEATURED 



Two classes in the amateur horticultural section 
of next year's Philadelphia Flower Show call for flats 
of pansies grown from seed by the exhibitor. Pansies 
aren't the easiest of plants to grow from seed, so 
some degree of horticultural skill is required to do so. 
While the number who can exhibit at the Flower 
Show is limited, this is a good chance to try your 
hand at pansy growing so you will have an abundance 
of them in your garden next spring. 

The first step is to obtain seed from a reliable 
source because old pansy seed has an extremely low 
percentage of germination. A specialist offers the 
widest assortment of varieties. Be sure to order seeds 
and make other preparations early enough for sowing 
them between August 4 and 10. 

A cold frame is practically a necessity for pansy 
growing. It makes it possible to control sunlight, 
to protect young seedlings from the hard rains of 
summer, to give extra winter protection and to hasten 
plants into growth in late winter in order to have 
early flowers. For exhibitors, the cold frame will 
make it possible to produce excellent specimens by 
show time. Damping-off is a particularly serious 
problem not only because of the warm temperatures 
of the first part of August, but also because pansy 
seedlings require soil high in organic matter. The 
cold frame provides a decided advantage in controlling 
this problem. 

Procedure 

In a cold frame, prepare a light, friable soil by 
mixing into ordinary garden soil a substantial amount 
of well rotted compost. Well decomposed peat moss 
may be used, but since many local soils already tend 
to be acid, agricultural limestone may be required 
to bring the pH up to 6-6.5. Instead of peat, you can 
use vermiculite and/or perlite to lighten soil without 
changing pH. 

Bank the soil toward the back of the cold frame 
so the seed bed slopes forward (as shown in the dia- 
gram of a cross-section of the frame) and leave a 
channel or slight trench along the bottom at the front 
inside edge. While the seedlings require moisture, 



they must not be excessively wet at any time; the 
sloping seed bed will aid in the run-off of water. 

After preparing the soil cover it with a half inch 
of vermiculite or perlite, then treat all with Pano- 
drench (following directions on the bottle) to rid 
the seedbed of damping-off organisms, or treat the 

seeds with Arasan powder. 

Either method is effective. 

Broadcast the seed on 
the surface of the bed and 
~ rake it in very lightly or 
sprinkle a light covering of 
additional new (not previously used) perlite over the 
top. Be sure to mark the divisions between varieties. 




y<m^-^^^'^y^^ii 



Next, cover the cold frame with burlap and keep 
it moist by sprinkling with water several times each 
day. 

Just after the plants appear, remove the burlap 
cover. Spray them and the surface of the seedbed 
with a combination of 1 ''i tablespoons Phaltan and 2 
tablespoons Captan per gallon of water. Cover the 
frame with lath or one of the plastic screening materials 
which admits about 50% light. Keep either a glass 
or polyethylene sash nearby to cover the cold frame 
during storms. Pansies require light friable soil for 
maximum root development, so it is important to pro- 
tect them from the pounding rains of late summer. 
Raindrops, en masse, compact the soil to a much great- 
er extent than realized by most gardeners. Also, while 
we can always add water, it is impossible to remove 
excessive amounts of it. 

Thin the plants as they grow and require more 
space. Allow the largest to remain in the frame ; the 
extras can be planted in rows in the vegetable garden 
or a similar place. Be sure to plant them in raised 
beds or even on top of slightly ridged rows ; however, 
to prevent excessive water from collecting at the roots. 

After growth has come to a standstill in Novem- 
ber, sprinkle a 5-10-5 fertilizer on the soil around the 
plants and work it in without damaging roots. After 
the soil is frozen, cover the plants with salt hay or 

(cont'd next page] 



PANSIES TO BE FEATURED— (Continued) 

evergreen boughs. The plants in both the frame and 
garden beds should be covered only lightly; you 
should still be able to see them. 

On January first — a good New Year's Day job — 
put the glass sash on the cold frame and in a few days 
remove the protective boughs or salt hay from the 
plants. The air in the frame and the plants will 
gradually begin to warm-up, depending somewhat on 
the season. Even if yours is a hotbed with an electric 
heating element, do not turn it on. Pansies require 
a cool soil and warm air rather than the reverse. It is 
unlikely that the plants will require watering during 
January and February. The plants in the frame will 
start blooming very early and you'll be able to pick 
flowers to bring indoors. 

If you are planning to exhibit plants at the Flower 
Show (see page 4 for entry procedure), a week or 
two beforehand fill a Flower Show fiat with your 
best plants. Give them a foliar feeding of Rapid-Gro 
and keep them in the cold frame. If many blooms are 
open and you wish to retard the plants, keep them 
cool by opening the frame slightly without allowing 
the plants to freeze. If there are several buds which 
you wish to force into bloom, keep the frame closed 
so the sun's rays will produce maximum warmth 
during the day. You can also cover the frame with 
an old rug or a similar mat as soon as the warmth 
of the sun begins to wane in the afternoon in order 
to retain as much heat as possible through the night. 
(A thermometer is extremely useful if placed at about 
the level of the flower buds in the frame) 

Varieties 

The varieties called for in the Flower Show 
Classes are Pitzonka's New Prize Mixture and Giant 
White. These were chosen because they germinate 
in six to ten days. Also in this quick-to-germinate 
category are : Coronation Gold, Blue Boy, Violet 
Jewel. Giant Yellow, and Pitzonka's Super Giant Mix- 
ture. The Swiss Giants, Pink Shades, Lake of Thun, 
Golden Yellow, Fire Beacon and Alpenglow are 
slower to germinate than are several other varieties. 

Violas 

For growing violas from seed, follow the same 
procedure as that for pansies. If growing both, how- 
ever, do not sow them at the same time in the same 
cold frame because the viola seed germinates in four 
or five days as compared to the six to ten days of the 
quick-to-germinate pansy varieties. Either sow the 
viola seed about three days later than the pansy seed, 
or sow them in a separate fiat which can be removed 



WILDFLOWER GUIDE 

For the beginner, and for those not at the very be- 
ginning, too, an extremely useful and quite outstand- 
ing little wildflower guide is available in the June 
issue of Woman's Day. 

An insert, the guide is smaller than full magazine 
size and is designed to be cut out and stapled into 
a separate little booklet. It contains illustrations of 
over two hundred wildfiowers which are classified 
according to color. Code letters indicate blooming 
times, environment, and whether or not each flower 
can be picked. This is extremely useful for anyone 
working with groups of children or in similar pro- 
grams where a very inexpensive guide is needed for 
a large number of individuals. 

If not available at your local A&P store, the 
June issue of Woman's Day can be ordered by sending 
20c per copy to Woman's Day BCOP, P.O. Box 1035, 
Greenwich, Connecticut. 

GARDEN TIP* 

. . . from the garden of Mr. and Mrs. James 
Bush-Brown, Ambler 

Cover your compost heap with black polyethylene 
to hasten decomposition. The cover increases temper- 
ature, retains moisture, and therefore increases the 
activity of soil organisms which break down vegetable 
matter into usable form. 

Probably most appealing of all is the fact that 
the cover eliminates the need for turning the pile 
from time to time. 

* Have you learned some horticultural tricks or 
developed techniques in your garden which would be 
helpful to other Members? If so, wouldn't you like 
to send the information to the NEWS for possible 
publication in a future issue? A brief note outlining 
your Garden Tip is all that is necessary ; we'll contact 
you for details. 



from the cold frame as soon as the plants are up and 
then returned after the pansies have germinated. Be 
sure to follow the same soil treatment procedures for 
the soil in flat, too, else this could become a source 
of infection for the whole frame. 

Varieties recommended are : Blue Perfection, 
King Henry, Arkwright Ruby. White Perfection is 
called for in Class 618 of next year's Flower Show 
Schedule. 



I LIBRARY SUGGESTIONS 

Anyone Can Grow Roses by Cynthia Westcott. (Van 
Nostrand, 1960) 

Third edition of the plant doctor's rose book 
includes a revision of the former work and, as 
before, very complete data on identification of 
rose pests and pesticides. A listing of pulslic rose 
gardens, a chapter on rose propagation and greater 
detail on preparing roses for exhibition are new 
features. 

Japanese Gardens for Today by David H. Engel. 
(Tuttle, 1959) 

Sets forth principles of designs of Japanese 
gardens and how they may be applied in a blend- 
ing of indoors and outdoors, nature and art. A 
wealth of information through text (English) 
and illustration of the old and also the new in 
Japanese landscape design. 

Commercial Flower Forcing by Alex Lauri, D. C. 
Kiplinger and Kennard S. Nelson. (McGraw- 
Hill, 1958) 

Recent changes in the commercial growing of 
flowers have necessitated a revision of this stand- 
ard work. Written as a textbook it will be useful 
to all flower growers as well as those growing 
plants under glass. 

Treasures of the Garden by Marcel Uze (Hanover 
House, 1959) 

Translated and adapted from "Belles Fleurs 
de Nos Jardins" by Anthony J. Huxley, who says 
its purpose is "for those who enjoy flowers. It 
does not instruct: it aims to please". However 
along with illustrations in color and black and 
white close-ups there is included some informa- 
tion on the purpose of flowers and how it is 
fulfilled. 

Diseases and Pests of Ornamental Plants by Pascal 
P. Pirone, Bernard O. Dodge, and Harold Rickett. 
(Ronald Press, 1%0) 

This volume (third edition) is sponsored by the 
N. Y. Botanical Garden and is the result of re- 
search in its garden as well as of other plant 
pathologists. It is divided into two parts the 
first of which gives symptoms and causes for 
diseases and pests of all important ornamental 
plants. The second part is arranged alphabetically 
by host plants and gives symptoms, the why and 
wherefore and the best methods of control. For 
specialists or amateurs this is a very helpful work. 



CLIMBING PEACH 

. . . not a peach 

Some recent periodicals have carried glowing 
two page advertisements for "Amazing Climbing 
Vine Peaches — first discovered in Europe — test 
grown at Cornell University." 

It is amazing that anj'one should have the 
audacity to mislead the public in such a manner. 
True, the correct botanical name for the plant oii'ered 
is carried (in one publication, on the third page and 
in very small i)rint) but the botanical name as pre- 
sented means little to the average homeowner. 

The plant ofl^^ered in this l^latant advertisement 
is not a ])eath at all. It is a tender annual vine, 
Cucumis melo var. Chito. It is nothing more than a 
variety of muskmelon which is burdened with a string 
of 'common names : Orange-melon, Mango-melon, 
Melon-apple, Vine-peach, Garden-lemon and Vege- 
table-orange. This array of confusion is a particularly 
good example of the lack of reliability of common 
names. It is also an example of gross mis-use of a 
plant name. 

Bailey's Cyclopedia of Horticulture states, "Vine, 
less robust than that of muskmelon, and leaves small- 
er: fruit size, shape and color of an orange or lemon, 
without markings, with white or pale cucumber-like 
flesh with no muskmelon odor. Not edible in its 
natural state, but useful for the making of preserves 
and pickles." 

As for its being tested at Cornell University, 
a telephone call to Dr. George L. Slate of the New 
York State Agricultural Experiment Station at 
Geneva brought the following statement: "To rny 
knowledge the last time Cucumis melo var. Chito was 
grown here was in 1923 or 1924." 

In spite of what the advertisement offers in 
glowing prose (at $3.95 per two plants!), Cucumis 
melo var. Chito by whatever name it is called will 
never replace the true peach, Prunus persica, in its 
many varieties. 

As Members of the Pennsylvania Horticultural 
Society we all have a responsibility to alert other 
gardeners to this situation and to similar ones which 
appear in various publications from time to time. 

DAILY TIMELY TIPS 

Did you know that you can dial BR 5-57(X) every 
day, Monday through Saturday, and get a timely tip 
on lawns, shrubs, flowers, trees and vegetables? This 
is a service of the Montgomery County Agent. A 
recorded message, new each day, it can be obtained 
at any hour. 



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DATES to mark on 



JUNE 28-30 



Pennsylvania State University 
GARDEN DAYS 

A three day ]5rogram for gardeners at Pennsyl- 
vania State University, University Park. The lecture 
jjrogram includes information on plant materials, 
flower arranging, flower show schedules, point scoring 
for specimen judging, lawn making and pest control. 
The registration fee is $20.00 including room and 
meals. 

For details, contact your County Agent. 

JULY 

The dates of the first Garden Clinics, a part of 
the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society's new program, 
will he announced in the August issue of the NEWS 
which will be mailed the third week in July. The 
August Clinics will be. on lawn care. Special clip-out 
reserxation l^lanks will he provided for the convenience 
of Members wishing to register for individual clinics 
as they are announced. 

SUMMER 1960 (closes September 25) 

FLORIADE 

The International Horticultural Exposition 
Rotterdam, Holland 

Be sure to see the Pennsylvania Horticultural 
Societv exhibits. 



CHRYSANTHEMUM SHOW SCHEDULES 
are available ujion request to anyone interested 
in exhibiting in the 1960 show which is to be 
staged in the Swarthmore College Field House, 
Octol^er 21-23. 



your CALENDAR 
JULY 

SPECIAL CLASSES 
1961 PHILADELPHIA FLOWER SHOW 

The following special classes which call for plants 
to be grown by the exhibitor from seed, are announced 
for the 1961 Philadelphia Flower Show. 

603 Pansy, Pitzonka's New Prize Mixture; to be 
shown in a standard flower show flat (see below). 

604 Begonia leptotricha, var. Woolly Bear; to be 
shown in a clay pot. 

611 Pansy, Giant White; to be shown in a standard 
flower show flat. 

612 Begonia acida ; to be shown in a 'clay pot. 

618 Viola, White Perfection ; to be shown in a 
standard flower show flat. 

619 Primula oliconica, blue; to be shown in a clay pot. 

All seeds may be obtained from the Society at 
the time of making entries. Due to spate limitations, 
only twenty entries can be accepted for each class and 
must be made before July 15. 
* * * * 

Prices on seed, per packet, as follows: pansy 
$1.00; viola 75c; begonia 25c; ])rimu!a 25c. 

For pansy and viola classes, standard flower show 
cedar flats (9"xl3"x3"). cut and ready to be nailed 
together, are available from the Society for 52c each. 

TOPIARY IVY 

Also announced at this time is Class 607 - Topiary 
I\v. There is no size limitation in this class, and 
while it is not necessary to make early entries, the 
announcement is made in order to give exhibitors 
ample time for training plants. 



THE PENNSYLVANIA 
HORTICULTURAL 



SOCIETY 



[17 PENNSYLVANr 
ILADELPHIA 3. PENNSYLVAh 




VOL. I No. 6 



LAWN MOWERS CAN BE DANGEROUS 



Like most of the convenient machines with which 
we are provided today, the lawn mower has so become 
a part of everyday routine that it is easy to lose sight 
of some of the dangers involved in its use. This is 
especially true of rotary mowers, although even the 
older reel type demands respectful and alert handling 
at all times. In an article by Dr. J. Gershon-Cohen, 
"A New Danger: the Power Lawn Mower", which 
appeared in the June 1959 issue of the Pennsylvania 
Medical Journal, some facts and figures are presented 
on mower accidents as well as some basic rules for 
lawn mower use. 

"... In a recent report on the radiologic aspects 
of lawn mower injuries forty cases were analyzed in 
1958 at one of two hospitals serving a suburban 
population of 15,000. Extrapolation of these figures 
and estimation of the number of unreported cases 
might indicate 200.000 injuries nationally due to lawn 
mower injuries. An earlier report on fifty cases esti- 
mated 50,000 cases nationally in 1956. Whatever the 
present number, the incidence is growing rapidly. 

"In another study of 794 injuries occurring in 
Georgia in a two-year period. 70% were found to be 
due to direct contact with the revolving blades and 
the remainder were due to flying objects ; 69% of the 
missile injuries were to the lower extremities, 16.2% 
to the eyes, and 7.0% to the head or neck (excluding 
eyes). Permanent disability followed in 14.1% and 
9.3% of the injuries were accompanied by complica- 
tions. The high percentage of injuries reported to 
the eyes indicates that milder traumata to other 
portions of the body remain unreported. Most fre- 
quently the injured person was not the operator, 
but a bystander. 

"The older reel-type power mower is relatively 
safe because it develops a downward thrust. The 
rotary mower is much more dangerous and accounts 
for more than 80% of all injuries. The blades often 
make 4000 revolutions per minute, which jjresents a 
formidable cutting force when making contact with 
a part of the body. Severe lacerations, avulsions, or 
amputations of the toes, foot, fingers, and hand are 



the usual consequence. A case is reported of decorti- 
cation of the right parietal bone and scalp when two 
young children ran an unattended mower onto the 
head of a sleeping friend. 

"A second source of injuries is the propulsion of 
stones or other hard matter lying on the lawn or 
embedded in it. A four-cycle engine rotating a twenty 
inch blade 3000 times per minute can hurl a two 
ounce stone or sixteen-penny nail at a speed of 170 
miles per hour, much like a shell fragment. It is no 
wonder that several deaths have resulted from such 
accidents. 

"The ultimate responsibility for prevention rests 
with the operator, who should be advised to observe 
the following precautions: (1) Clear the lawn of all 
stone-s, nails, bones, wire, or other potentially danger- 
ous objects. (2) Keep the feet in a safe position when 
starting the motor. (3) Know how to stop or dis- 
engage the engine rapidly. (4) Never work on the 
machine while it is running. (5) Never leave it un- 
attended. (6) Never try to tip the mower by reaching 
underneath. (7) Never iet the moving mower pull 
you along. (8) Check occasionally to be certain the 
blades are not loose. (9) Do not let children play 
with the mower." 

There is little doubt that the last rule is probably 
the most important. It should be extended, however, 
to include the thorough alerting of children using 
power mowers to the dangers involved. Even very 
young children are seen running power mowers 
every day. It is natural that they get some pleasure 
from such activity — perhaps it is the desire to "drive" 
something which is satisfied — but parents must be 
alert to the risks involved. Until a child is old enough 
to understand and follow the rules listed above he 
is not old enough to run a power mower, especially 
the rotary type. 

Where small children and dogs are numerous in 
a neighborhood, it is almost impossible to keep a lawn 
free of potential missiles, so perhaps, while the lawn 
is being mowed, it is wise to keep it unpopulated 
except for the operator of the lawn mower. 



PLANTS FOR SUMMER DISTINCTION 

The mass of color which dominates the garden 
in spring and in early summer is the stuff of which a 
gardener dreams, hut all too soon this fantasy gives 
way to midsummer when, unless we have been ex- 
ceptionally ambitious in getting a great many annuals 
started, the garden goes into its hot weather slump. 
The Japanese beetles arrive to inhabit the roses along 
with the blackspot, the perennial phlox is apt to be 
a mildewed disappointment, especially if we have seen 
its luxuriant bloom in cool mountain and seashore 
climates, and in the brilliant heat of August, even the 
leaves of most shrubs hang limp. Dog days come 
to the garden, too. 

To counteract the wilted look, the garden needs 
a few plants which stand up boldly to such adversity. 
Plants with strong design characteristics develop 
shadow patterns which are sharper and more interest- 
ing as the sun gets hotter and brighter. Some are 
evergreen ; some, deciduous. Some are woody plants ; 
some, herbaceous annuals and perennials. Some are 
old, common and easily available. Some are not, but 
new or old, rare or common, these plants will give a 
hot weather pick-up to your garden. 

Leatherleaf mahonia {Mahonia beali) is an ex- 
tremely handsome broadleaf evergreen which has a 
pre-historic atmosphere about it. The compound 
leaves, up to sixteen inches in length, are composed 
of nine to fifteen coarsely toothed leaflets. The leaflets 
are tough and leathery. The new foliage is the color 
of a new green apple ; the mature foliage, dull, dark 
green, not shiny like that of the more common 
Oregon holly-grape {Mahonia aquijolium). 

Like many other broadleaf evergreens. Leather- 
leaf mahonia will withstand some shade and in winter 
should be protected from sun and wind to prevent 
excessive burning of the leaves. 

This mahonia was brough out of China by Robert 
Fortune who first named it Berberis beali in honor of 
Thomas Clay Beal, Portuguese consul to Shanghai 
before 1860. While botanically similar to the bar- 
berries all mahonias were later taken out of the genus 
Berberis because of certain structural differences. 

Hercules club (Aralia spinosa) is also commonly 
called Devil's walking-stick and Angelica tree. While 
this plant was much used in Victorian gardens and 
w-as condemned by landscapists of the first four 
decades of this century, Aralia can play an important 
role in contemporary garden design. Growing in 
clusters of several heavily thorned trunks, six to ten 
feet tall, the glory of this plant is in its huge, doubly 
decompound leaves which are reminiscent of lusti, 
fragile fern fronds. One leaf may be three or four 
feet long and nearly as broad, but subdivided as it is 
into many, many small leaflets, its texture is remindful 
of a tropical rain forest. 



Aralia ])ro(luc(.'s great terminal clusters of stnall 
white flowers in midsummer. These are followed by 
small black fruits, but the fruit stems are brilliant 
coral red. 

Aralia grows anywhere; in fact, it can be a nui- 
sance if not controlled. Since it sends up many shoots 
from the ground, this plant is particularly well planted 
in a pocket in paving where its roots are easily con- 
fined, but even if planted in among other plants, a 
confining root barrier can be made with redwood, 
transite. flagstone or a similar material. It should be 
planted where one can get underneath its leaves for 
fullest enjoyment because it is seen at its best when 
sunlight streams through its exceptional leaf pattern. 

Oak-leaf hydrangea (Hydrangea quercifolia) is an- 
other shrub having summertime distinction. Its leaves 
are four to eight inches long and are strongly toothed 
in the manner of an oak leaf. Dark, dull green in 
summer, they turn rich crimson in autumn as an added 
dividend. The flowers appear in late June in elongated 
panicles, some a foot long, and are remindful of those 
of Doublefile viburnum {Viburnum plicatum tomentosum) 
w^ith large sterile florets standing above the small 
creamy white fertile ones at the heart of the flower 
cluster. 

Easily kept waist high. Oak-leaf hydrangea lends 
itself well for use as an irregular hedge, especially in 
country gardens, or can be used as an individual plant 
where a strong design note is desired. 

Native to Georgia, Florida and westward to Mis- 
sissippi, it was found in Georgia and named by Phila- 
delphia's William Bartram, son of John Bartram. 

Several other plants also have summertime 
distinction : 

Plume-poppy (Macleaya cordata). sometimes still 
listed as Bocconia. is a tall growing perennial with 
large heart shaped leaves which are deeply cut much 
like those of bloodroot. The leaves are silver-gray, 
distinctly white underneath, and the small flowers 
are borne in feathery plumes in July. 

Short-cluster plantain-lily (Hosta glauca) , is the 
most handsome of hostas. Its large leaves are a beau- 
tiful blue-gray color. A massive plant, as compared 
to other hostas, this one is often incorrectly listed as 
H. sieboldiana. 

Castor bean {Ricinus communis) is one of the 
easiest of all plants to grow, yet it can still provide 
zest to the summer garden. The dark leaved varieties 
are most distinctive. Grow enough so you can cut 
the tops out of some (put them in hot water, then 
cool water and plant in the basement) and they'll 
]Drovide a striking decoration for the living room. 
Keep the seeds away from children since they are 
poisonous if eaten. 



1 



CUT FLOWER CARE 

The sjardcner who knows differently cringes when 
he or she still reads in directions for picking garden 
flowers "plunge to the necks in cold water", because 
investigation has shown this not to lie the best treat- 
ment. Instead, put all flowers in warm (bath tem- 
perature) water as soon as they are picked, then set 
the container in a cool place, such as the basement, 
where flowers and water will cool together. Hot water 
moves easier and faster in the stem than does cold 
water. Probably the hot water also clears the stem 
of air and bubbles. 

Some directions for picking flowers also call for 
picking in the cool of the evening. There was some 
logic to this technique when cold water was used 
since the cool stem tissues would contract less when 
placed in the cold water than would warm tissues. 
When using hot water to get maximum water absorp- 
tion, it makes little difference what time of day is 
chosen for picking. It is even possible that since 
carbohydrate content of plant tissues is highest when 
temperatures are highest, there might be some value 
in picking during the hottest part of the day. 

Follow these rules in cut flower treatment : 
{from Cornell University: Nine Ways to Add Hours 
to Your Flowers) 

1. Wash containers with soap and hot water between 
uses to remove bacteria. 

2. Before placing flowers in water cut oflF a small 
piece of stem to insure fresh cut. Crush stem 
ends of woody plants with a hammer. In general, 
the flowers of trees and shrubs keep better if at 
least part of the foliage is removed. 

3. Remove foliage which will be submerged in final 
arrangement. 

4. Use hot water (110° F) and let flowers and water 
cool naturally. 

5. Wrap flowers loosely with paper to reduce air 
movement around them and resultant water loss. 
After they become turgid (two hours or so) 
arrange in final container. 

6. Use commercial cut flower food in water. These 
contain sugars and acidifiers which prevent bac- 
terial growth and in most cases extend cut flower 
life. 

7. Keep flowers cold when not in use (30-35* F.) 
except for orchids which should not be stored 
at temperatures below 50° F. 

8. Do not place cut flowers in a draught or near 
radiator, registers or other sources of excessive 
heat. 

9. Place the cut stem end of poppies, poinsettias, 
dahlias in boiling water for thirty seconds, then 
in the bath-temperature water. 



LIBRARY SUGGESTIONS 

Amaryllis Year Book of the American Amaryllis 
Society. (American Plant Life Society, 1960) 

Amaryllis as a holiliy. greenhouse culture, 
details on propagating liy seeds, transplanting, 
catalog of many cultivars and instructions for 
photographing them in the garden are among the 
features of this volume. 

Rock Garden Plants by Doretta Klaber. (Holt, 1959) 
That rock garden plants may be used to great 
advantage in any setting — around new houses or 
old — with year-round succession of bloom or color 
interest has not been fully considered until now. 
From her own practical experience, Mrs. Klaber, 
a member of the Pennsylvania Horticultural So- 
ciety and the proprietor of Cloud Hill Nursery, 
Quakertown, Pa., has written a book for amateur 
and professional gardeners with complete details 
on all phases of growing and using these plants. 
Lovely pen and ink drawings by the author illus- 
trate over 400 plants which would be useful in 
any region of the country. 

Floral Decorations for Your Church by Fern Bowers 
Hunt. (Chilton, 1960) 

This concise yet comprehensive book includes 
the relationship of Church architecture and floral 
arrangement, a discussion of Church decoration 
through the years, elements of design and color 
harmony, backgrounds, containers and accesso- 
ries, arrangements for holidays and holy days of 
the Church year, weddings, teaching children 
Church decoration, symbolism of plant materials, 
and Christmas customs. 

Gardening for Gourmets by Ruth A. Matson. 
(Doubleday, 1959) 

This book is just right for those who appre- 
ciate good food (there are over a hundred recipes) 
and would like to grow their own vegetables in 
a small easy to manage plot. The emphasis is 
on good eating, not bumper crops. There are 
good hints on planning the garden, varieties of 
seed to use. basic tools required, planting sched- 
ules, as well as an interesting chapter on growing 
herbs, radishes, and lettuce on the kitchen counter 
under artificial light. 

How to Plan and Build Your Fireplace, A Sunset 
Book. (Lane Publishing Company, 1959) 

This book describes and illustrates how to plan 
and build every type of fireplace (outdoor, indoor- 
outdoor, and indoor) and gives details on 
how to add-on a fireplace. Working drawings 
for construction are included. 



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DATES to mark on 
AUGUST 23, 27 

GARDEN CLINIC: LAWN CARE 

A new service to Members is the Garden Clinics 
program which will be inaugurated on August 23 and 
27 with two sessions on lawn care. All clinics are de- 
signed to give on-the-spot information. 

To be most effective in getting accurate, funda- 
mental information across, it is necessary that each 
clinic be restricted to a small group. This gives all 
participants the chance to see, to hear, to ask ques- 
tions and to actually try their hand at any techniques 
which might be required by the subject of the clinic. 

The lawn care clinics will be conducted by 
Ernesta Drinker Ballard and Martha Ludes Garra at 



GARDEN CLINIC 

REGISTRATION 

Please register me for the following Lawn 
Care Clinic (registration fee $1.00) 

□ Tuesday, August 23, 6-8 P. M. 
(Ambler) 

n Saturday, August 27, 10 A.M. - 12 M. 
(Chestnut Hill) 

If the above sessions are filled, I would like 
to attend: 

n Thursday, August 25. 6-8 P.M. 
(Ambler) 

□ Tuesday, August 30, 10 A.M. - 12 M. 
(Chestnut Hill) 

Name ~ — - 

Address - ~ 

Telephone — - 

Your registration will be confirmed liy return 
mail. 



your CALENDAR 

their homes in Chestnut Hill and Ambler, respectively. 

Register by using the clip-out coupon below. 
Send it, along with $1.00 to The Pennsylvania Horti- 
cultural Society, 389 Suburban Station, Philadelphia 3. 
Registrations will be accepted in the order received ; 
confirmation will be made by return post card. This 
card must be presented at the clinic for which 
registration is made. 

Only Members of The Pennsylvania Horticultural 
Society are eligible to register for Garden Clinics. 

Future Garden Clinics scheduled : Soils, Bulbs, 
Gardening Indoors, Plant Propagation. Watch the 
NEWS for announcement of time and place. 



PHILADELPHIA FLOWER SHOW TO OPEN ON SUNDAY 

The 1961 Philadelphia Flower Show will open 
at 1 P. M. Sunday, which is a change from the usual 
Monday noon opening of the past. On Monday, the 
show will open at 9 A. M. 

JOHN BARTRAM PORTRAIT 
GIVEN TO SOCIETY 

A Charles Wilson Peale portrait of John Bartram 
has been given to the Pennsylvania Horticultural So- 
ciety by Mr. and Mrs. Richard W. Lloyd of Camden, 
South Carolina. On the back of the canvas is written: 
"Portrait of John Bartram of Darby, Died 1777. C. W. 
Peale, artist. Property of Isaac Bartram, 1795." 

The portrait was purchased in 1927 by Mr. 
Lloyd's mother, Mrs. Horatio Gates Lloyd, whose 
collection of rare old herbals and other horticultural 
and botanical treasures was presented to the Society 
in her memory, by her sons, in 1947. 



SOCIETY 



»I7 PENNSYLVANll^^H^RD 
PHILADELPHIA 3. PENNSYLVANIA 




VOL. I No. 7 



SEPTEMBER I960 



CRABGRASS CAN BE CONTROLLED 



The single most important step in controlling 
crabgrass is the establishment and maintenance of a 
vigorous, healthy turf. The importance of this factor 
cannot be over emphasized. Chemicals — the various 
crabgrass killers — are secondary measures and can- 
not be expected to do the job alone. 

FERTILIZER 

A lawn is made up of hundreds of thousands of 
individual grass plants which are in constant compe- 
tition with each other for nutrients and moisture. 
Weeds invade a thin lawn easily to compete with the 
desirable grasses. These same grasses in a natural, 
unmowed state could hold their own (crabgrass is 
not a problem in a hayfield), but in the mowed, man- 
made state they may be quickly overcome, especially 
in underfed lawns. 

Most lawns are underfed. This condition alone 
so reduces the vigor of the desirable grasses that it 
serves as a carte blanche invitation for crabgrass to 
take over. For detailed lawn fertilization recommen- 
dations, see the March 1960 NEWS. 

LIME 

Coupled with lawn fertility is the need to main- 
tain the acid-alkaline level of the soil at a point which 
allows soil organisms to maintain a high level of 
activity, otherwise much of the value of the fertilizer 
is lost. It is advisable to have the pH checked every 
three years, especially in Pennsylvania where soils 
tend to be on the acid side of the scale. Maintain pH 
5.9-6.9 for maximum grass growth. (Tests in the 
Chestnut Hill area of Philadelphia this spring revealed 
that many lawn soils were below pH 5!). 

A pH test of your lawn soils will be made at your 
County Agent's office and recommendations given for 
application of agricultural limestone. 

MOWING 

One of the greatest mistakes in lawn maintenance 



is close mowing. Since crabgrass seed germinate only 
in the presence of sunlight, close mowing provides 
exactly the condition needed. Close mowing also in- 
creases water loss and increases surface temperature ; 
both are conditions which hasten dormancy of blue- 
grasses in hot, dry weather. 

For mixed lawns and Kentucky Bluegrass lawns, 
set the mower at 2-2J^ inches. (Merion Bluegrass is 
usually cut lower where it is in a pure stand, at I'A -2 
inches.) Leave the mower the same height throughout 
the season even though it may mean more frequent 
cutting in spring. Regularity is important, too, be- 
cause frequent light clips produce smaller clippings 
which filter down between the grass blades to provide 
a moisture-preserving mulch on the soil surface. 

WATER 

It is better not to water at all than to water 
frequently and shallowly. Even when bluegrasses (the 
basic grass of most northern lawns) turn brown from 
lack of water, the roots withstand severe drought and 
new growth appears soon after the first rain. On the 
other hand, frequent, shallow watering encourages 
the germination of crabgrass seeds, increases the prob- 
ability of disease on bluegrasses and stimulates the 
growth of bentgrasses. The latter have come to be 
regarded as undesirable in ordinary home lawns be- 
cause they are highly susceptible to disease and will 
not withstand even slight drought. If you must water, 
be sure that it is needed ; thick turf can go for a long 
period without rain. Then apply enough water to 
penetrate to a depth of 6 inches. This takes hours; 
it is not a hose-in-hand operation. 

CHEMICAL KILLERS 

W^hile crabgrass seeds are very long lived and 
they work themselves to the surface constantly dur- 
ing the alternate freezing and thawing of the soil 
in winter, only a few have the opportunity to germ- 
inate in a healthy, vigorous turf. The few plants which 
appear each year can then be controlled with chemical 
crabgrass killers. These materials are divided into 



CRABSRASS— (cont.) 

two groups according to the time of application ; pre- 
cmergence (applied before crabgrass seed germinates) 
and post-emergence herbicides (applied after plants 
are visible). 

Pre-Emergence Chemicals 

Calcium arsenate is replacing many of the older 
crabgrass killers because it consistently gives a high 
degree of control with a minimum of injury to other 
lawn grasses. It can be applied any time from fall to 
late spring, before crabgrass germinates. Cross Coun- 
try Crabgrass Seed Killer (Sears) is straight calcium 
arsenate. NO-CRAB (Anchem) combines it with 
2,4-D and Silvex for the control of broadleaf weeds 
and chickweed in addition to the crabgrass. 

Dacthal, test marketed in several cities this year 
under the trade name of RID (Swift), has also pro- 
duced good control of crabgrass in Philadelphia area 
test plots. It is very new but shows much promise. 

Several other pre-emergence chemicals are avail- 
able, but they vary considerably in effectiveness and 
usefulness. Chlordane (HALTS, Ortho Chlordane, 
etc.) is not equally effective in all sections of the 
country and is often erratic in action in a given local- 
ity. While it also helps to control grubs and other 
soil insects, an application every three or four years 
for this purpose is sufficient. Lead arsenate (PAX) 
often causes severe damage to bluegrass. Crag Herbi- 
cide (Sesone), which kills all germinating seedlings, 
is dependent upon exacting moisture conditions at 
the time seedlings emerge from the soil. 

Post-emergence Killers 

All of the post-emergence chemicals require two 
or three applications to kill growing crabgrass. None 
of these materials can be applied haphazardly; the 
relationship between amounts used and area covered 
is of extreme importance. Don't guess how many 
thousand square feet of lawn you have; measure and 
find out. 

The most valuable post-emergence herbicide for 
controlling crabgrass is SODAR or DIMET. It can 
be used on even mature plants to give a quick kill. 
As with most herbicides, including 2,4-D for broadleaf 
weeds, it is exceedingly important to apply it when 
the soil is thoroughly moist. The ideal time is after 
a day's rain. Sodar lends itself well to spot treatment 
in the hands of an experienced user, but since there 
is a tendency to over apply herbicides and cause 
damage to desirable grasses, too, an overall application 
is safer. Spots where crabgrass has been eradicated 
with Sodar can be sown to desirable grass soon 
afterwards. 

Sodar is sold in both dry and liquid formulations 



such as Weedone Crabgrass Killer — Sodar Dry Form, 
Clout, and Liquid Weedone Crabgrass Killer — Sodar. 
DI-MET and SODAR are but slight variations of 
the same chemical. 

Phenyl mercuric acetate (PMA, PMAS, SCUTL) 
kills crabgrass seedlings in the two or three leaf stage 
of growth and continues to be effective until about 
mid-summer, when crabgrass begins to mat. Repeated 
applications are necessary at about ten day intervals. 
This material must not be used on Merion Bluegrass 
since it is highly sensitive to it. 

Potassium cynate (Weedone crabgrass killer with 
MCP, Cross Country Crabgrass Killer) causes con- 
siderable damage to other grasses, particularly the 
fine leaved fescues which often appear in mixed lawns, 
and has limited use. Its chief value and the reason 
for including it here is that it is much less expensive 
than other herbicides and has value for very large 
lawn areas (schools, private estates, parks). Potassium 
cynate can be used for eradicating heavy crabgrass 
infestations before mid-August lawn renovation be- 
cause it breaks down quickly in the soil, leaving no 
harmful residue. 

COSTS 

A great deal of money can be spent maintaining 
a lawn and controlling crabgrass. Herbicides are 
expensive, and try to gain control only with them 
while neglecting good basic cultural practices, is a 
waste of money. In a healthy, well managed turf, 
herbicides are worth the money spent because they 
can mean the difference between 90% and 100% 
eradication of crabgrass. (Any member of the Society 
who would like to compare costs of the various 
materials may obtain them by writing the NEWS.) 

TO SUM IT UP 

The control of crabgrass can be achieved in the 
average home lawn (which is usually a conglomeration 
of several grasses) by applying the following steps: 

1. Good cultural practice (absolutely the most 
important). 

2. Use of a pre-emergence herbicide, such as 
calcium arsenate or dacthal. 

3. Use of SODAR or DI-MET for treatment of 
mature crabgrass before it sets seed. 

A crabgrass control material which can be used 
only before new lawns are planted is calcium cyanamid 
(Aero-cyanamid, Lawn and Garden Cyanamid). Raked 
into the soil, this material kills all weed seeds, but 
three weeks must elapse between treatment and seed- 
ing of lawn grasses. 



I 



BERMUDA-NASSAU GARDEN TOUR 

A garden tour of Bermuda and Nassau for niem- 
liers and friends of The Pennsylvania Horticultural 
Society is scheduled to leave Philadelphia aboard the 
new Swedish American Liner, M. S. Gripsholm, on 
November 9, 1960. Arriving in Bermuda on Novem- 
ber 11, the group will go to the Bermuda Botanical 
Garden, to see plant collections and experimental work. 
The Horticultural Society group will also be the 
guests of the Bermuda Garden Club at Verdmont, 
where arrangements will be on display and Bermuda 
gardening discussed. Upon arriving in Nassau, No- 
vember 13, gardens will be opened to the Society so 
members can learn something of the joys of gardening 
on the subtropical Atlantic islands. Dinner ashore 
with a special guest speaker is also planned. 

The Gripsholm will return to Philadelphia at 
8:00 a.m. Wednesday, November 16. Additional in- 
formation will reach you in early September and more 
details will be announced in next month's NEWS. 

BIBLIOGRAPHY ON LAWN CARE: 

Available in the Society's Library 

Books 

Your Lawn. How to Make It and Keep It by 

R. Milton Carlton. (Van Nostrand, 1959) 

The Complete Book of Lawns by F. F. Rockwell 
and Esther C. Grayson. (Doubleday, 1956) 

Handbook on Lawns. Brooklyn Botanic Garden 
(Reprint of Plants and Gardens, vol. 12 no. 2. 
Summer 1956) 
Bulletins 

Better Lawns. U. S. Department of Agriculture. 
Home and Garden Bulletin No. 51. 1959. 

Control of Turf and Lawn Disease. The Penn- 
sylvania State University. College of Agricul- 
ture. Extension Service. Circular 492 

Athletic Fields. Design, Specifications, Construc- 
tion and Maintenance by H. B. Musser, J. M. 
Duich and J. C. Harper, II. The Pennsylvania 
State University. College of Agriculture, 
Extension Service. 
Articles 

Tackling the Lawn Problem in the Middle At- 
lantic States by Fred V. Grau. Garden Journal 
of the New York Botanical Garden. July- 
August 1958. 

FILM AND SLIDE LIST AVAILABLE 

A valuable list of films and slides which are 
available to garden clubs and other organizations for 
programs has been compiled by the Garden Writers 
Association of America. A wide range of horticultural 
and related topics are listed along with the running 
time, rental fee, source, and other pertinent informa- 
tion for each. This list is now available to members 
from the Society's library. 



EDITH WILDER SCOTT 

The garden world and The Pennsylvania Horti- 
cultural Society lost one of its beloved members, Edith 
Wilder Scott (Mrs. Arthur Hoyt Scott), who died on 
July 19. Many will treasure the rich associations and 
recall the special times spent with this "Distinguished 
Daughter of Pennsylvania". This and many other 
honors were bestowed upon her during a long and 
eventful lifetime. 

When Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Hoyt Scott began 
gardening more than a half century ago, their great 
interest and pleasure was to find the very best plant 
material for their garden. To achieve this they not 
only traveled far and wide to make their selections, 
but also developed their own seedlings, many of which 
took top honors in flower shows. The single herba- 
ceous peony, Rose Valley, an exquisite pink with a 
golden center; the lilacs, Scotia and Todmorden, along 
with other prize plants, were given to interested 
nurserymen for propagation — just one of the many 
expressions of generosity that came from them and 
their garden. 

After Mr. Scott's death a living memorial to him 
was begun by Mrs. Scott in the form of The Arthur 
Hoyt Scott Horticultural Foundation at Swarthmore 
College. This beautiful collection of plant material 
includes the best varieties, all carefully labeled, for the 
amateur gardener to study. 

Over the years Mrs. Scott served or was a director 
of many garden organizations, including our own 
Society, the Garden Club of America, the Four Coun- 
ties Garden Club, the Providence Garden Club. 

Each one who had the pleasure of visiting Mrs. 
Scott at Todmorden left with choice plants and an 
armful of her favorite flowers. (She often said she 
had a "give-away-garden.") Long after the blossoms 
faded and the plants were dormant one could recall 
a story that was light and gay, a remark that carried 
great understanding and, many times, sound advice 
for the future. 

PLANT HARDINESS ZONE MAP PUBLISHED 

A new plant hardiness zone map has just been 
published by the Agricultural Research Service of 
the U. S. Department of Agriculture. It shows the 
expected minimum temperatures of the horticulturally 
important areas of the U. S. and Canada. Since it 
names every county within each state, it is possible 
to determine the divisions between zones in more 
detail than in past maps. 

For a copy of the map send 15c to Superintendent 
of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office, 
Washington 25, D. C. 



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DATES to Mark on 

SEPTEMBER 17 

GARDEN CLINIC: SOILS 

10 A. M. Fairmount Park Greenhouse 

Martha Ludes Garra will demonstrate and 
explain the importance of so'l structure as it relates 
to the retention of moisture, drainage and growth. 
The importance of organic matter in maintaining soil 
tilth will be discussed, and soil management practices 
outlined. 

Register by using the clip-out coupon below. Send 
it, along with $1.00 to The Pennsylvania Horticultural 
Society, 389 Suburban Station, Philadelphia 3. 
Registrations will be accepted in the order received; 
confirmation will be made by return post card. This 
card must be presented at the clinic for which 
registration is made. 

Only Members of The Pennsylvania Horticultural 
Society are eligible to register for Garden Clinics. 

Future Garden Clinics scheduled : Bulbs, Garden- 
ing Indoors, Plant Propagation. Watch the NEWS 
for announcement of time and place. 



GARDEN CLINIC 

REGISTRATION 

Please register me for the Soil Clinic for 
Saturday, September 17, 1960 (Registration 
fee $1.00) 



your CALENDAR 

SEPTEMBER 17-18 

MAIN LINE FLOWER SHOW 

Saturday 4:00-9:00 P.M. Conestoga High School 
Sunday 12: Noon-5:00 P.M. Berwyn, Pa. 

The theme of this Year's Main Line Flower Show 
is "State of the Union," and includes classes for a wide 
variety of specimens and arrangements. 



Name 

Address 



Telephone - 

Your registration will be confirmed by return 
mail. 



OCTOBER 4 



2:00 P.M. 



"DRIED ARRANGEMENTS' 

Ruth Gannon 



Sheraton Hotel 

Miss Gannon is a widely known garden lecturer 
and author. In her Philadeljihia program for the 
Society she will demonstrate the use of dried plant 
materials in arrangements, Shoji screens, table mats 
and in other ways. Free to Members and their guests. 

OCTOBER 12-13 

SYMPOSIUM on PENNSYLVANIA GARDENS 

Strawberry Mansion, Fairmount Park, Philadelphia 

OCTOBER 21 • 23 

CHRYSANTHEMUM SHOW 

Swarthmore College Field House, Swarthmore, Pa. 



NOVEMBER 9-16 

THE PENNSYLVANIA HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 
GARDEN CRUISE - Bermuda and Nassau 

(See page 3) 



THE PENNSYLVANIA 
HORTICULTURAL 



SOCIET' 



1617 PENNSYLVANIA BOULEVARD 
PHILADELPHIA 3. PENNSYLVANIA 




VOL I No. 8 



OCTOBER I960 



ffO MARt* 



FORCED BULBS BRING PREVIEW OF SPRING 



Bring brilliant color and fragrance to your indoor 
garden — be it just a windowsill — by forcing hardy 
bulbs. Satisfying as they are, we should not limit 
our efforts to growing only the more frequently seen 
narcissus, tulips and hyacinths. Many of the little 
bulbs such as Iris reticulata, species crocus and species 
tulips, muscari and scilla also bring a foretaste of 
spring, indoors, in the early months of the year. 

To force hardy bulbs it is necessary to give them 
conditions similar to those in which they flourish in 
the garden: a period of coolness and moisture for 
maximum root and bud development, followed by a 
gradual increase of temperature and light for bloom- 
ing. We accelerate the process in pots and can control 
the blooming time to provide color from January to 
April when the outdoor bulbs can then take over. 

For forcing, purchase top quality bulbs. Select 
named varieties recommended in the list below or in 
the catalogues, because all varieties are not easy to 
force. 

Containers may vary in size depending upon what 
bulbs are to be grown in them. A seven inch bulb 
pan (pot) will hold only three double-nose daflfodil 
bulbs, but the same size could hold six or more tulip 
bulbs or as many as a dozen scilla or muscari. While 
bulb pans and azalea pots are standard containers 
for forcing bulbs they are not the only possibilities. 
Decorative ceramic pots, if they have a drainage hole 
in the bottom, are most attractive. Antique brown 
pottery salt crocks, sometimes seen at country auc- 
tions, can be converted to a suitable container by 
boring a hole in the bottom. Whatever the container, 
it should be scrubbed clean before using. 

Hardy bulbs for forcing can be potted any time 
from September to late November, but daffodils and 
many of the small bulbs should be prepared as early 
as possible since they make their root growth early 
in autumn. 

A wheelbarrow makes a convenient container in 
which to mix equal parts by bulk, good garden loam, 
sand and sifted compost or moist peat moss. For each 
bushel of potting mixture add two cups of a complete 
fertilizer, one in which a part of the nitrogen is in 
unea-form. Mix thoroughly. To lighten the weight 



for easier handling, you may add up to one-half 
(by bulk) perlite. Mix again very thoroughly to 
produce a fine textured, light mixture. 

When you are ready to plant, place broken pot 
chips over the drainage hole. Add enough prepared 
soil so that when the bulbs are placed on it, their 
tips will be about one inch below the rim of the con- 
tainer. Then fill in around them with soil and press 
it firmly into place. A pot label makes a good tool 
for this purpose. The tips of the bulbs can be either 
just barely covered or left exposed. Label each pot 
and then set in a container of water until the surface 
of the soil is thoroughly moist. (Adrain Frylink, a 
Director, N. E. Region, American Dafifodil Society, 
recommends the practice of soaking all daffodil bulbs 
24 hours in cold water before potting. He claims this 
to be equal to about two weeks in the pot.) When 
potting tulip bulbs, place the flatish side of the bulb 
toward the outside of the pot because the lowest leaf 
emerges on that side of the bulb. This helps make a 
more attractive pot when the tulips are in bloom. 

After planting, place the containers in a cool, dark 
place for bud and root development. A trench in the 
vegetable garden or a cold frame where they can be 
covered with peat moss, excelsior or leaves is usually 
used, but if you are lucky enough to have a root 
cellar or a hatchway (steps leading from a house 
cellar to the outside covered by slanting doors) it is 
unnecessary to cover the pots. In the cold frame or 
trench normal rainfall will provide adequate moisture 
but in root cellar or hatchway, extra watering is 
necessary from time to time. 

To protect developing shoots, especially where 
mice are a problem, invert an empty pot of the same 
size over each filled one. This also makes it a little 
easier to remove pans from the deep mulch of the 
trench without damaging shoots when some of the 
mulch has frozen. Be sure to mulch deeply enough 
to prevent freezing of the bulbs : 3-6 inches of peat 
moss, a deep mulch (12 inches) of leaves and a few 
evergreen boughs or boards to hold the mulch in place 
are necessary. 

Examine after six weeks ; some of the varieties 
will have filled the pots with roots to the extent that 

(conlinued next page) 



FORCED BULBS BRING PREVIEW OF SPRING— (Cont'd) 

they are growing through the drainage hole. When 
this has happened, (and only then) bring them indoors 
for gentle forcing. Be sure they have sufficient 
moisture and place them first in a cool spot such as 
an unhealed garage or cellar in half light. After a 
week or ten days give full sunlight and more heat, 
and water freely until they bloom. Find a cool place 
in the house where you will enjoy watching them. 
Often dafifodils and tulips not only look better on the 
floor, but if the light is good, the cooler temperatures 
at floor level help prolong their bloom period. After 
blooming, gradually reduce water and return pots to 
a cool place until the foliage withers; water when 
needed. With the exception of tulips, most of the 
bulbs mentioned can be planted in the garden where 
they will recover to bloom again in future springs. 

VARIETIES 

Narcissus: Rustom Pasha, Carlton, Beersheba, 
King Alfred, Cragford, Geranium, Mt. Hood, Golden 
Harvest, Scarlet Elegance, Red Goblet (red cupped 
varieties need cooler temperatures for deep color 
development — if forced too quickly they are pale. 
For extra deep color in narcissus, apply calcium ni- 
trate: 2 tablespoons/gal. water twice while iorcing. 
To prevent tips of leaves from yellowing keep water 
in saucer under pot constantly.) 

Single Early Tulips: De Wet (orange and fra- 
grant). Pink Perfection (soft pink and white). White 
Hawk (pure white). 

Double Early Tulips : Mr. Van Der Hoef (golden 
yellow), Murillo Maxima (rose-pink), Schoonoord 
pure white). 

Hyacinths: Pink Pearl (clear pink), Myosotis 
(light blue), L'Innocence (pure white). 

Species Tulips: Tulipa Fosteriana Red Emperor, 
Tulipa turkestanica, Tulipa clusiana. 

Small Bulbs: Iris reticulata. Species crocus, Mus- 
cari in variety, Scilla (small flowered early forms), 
Puschkinia scilloides libanotica, Chionodoxa, Ipheon ujii- 
florum (also offered as Triteleia or Milla uniflorum). 

Many other varieties force equally well; these 
are suggestions. Some are listed in the Forced Bulb 
Classes for the 1961 Philadelphia Flower Show speci- 
men classes for amateurs. 



FORCED BULB CLASSES 
1961 PHILADELPHIA FLOWER SHOW 

The following classes for forced bulbs have been 
announced for the amateur horticultural section of 
the Philadelphia Flower Show, March 5-11, 1961. 

To be staged Sunday, March 5 : 

600 Trumpet Narcissus LORD WELLINGTON 
forced in an 8 inch bulb pan. 

601 Hyacinth L'INNOCENCE 
forced in an 8 inch bulb pan. 

602 Muscari armeniacum BLUE BOY 
forced in an 6 inch bulb pan. 

To be staged Tuesday, March 7: 

608 Trumpet Narcissus MUSIC HALL 
forced in an 8 inch bulb pan. 

609 Hyacinth CITY OF HAARLEM 
forced in an 8 inch bulb pan. 

610 Small bulbs, one kind only: 

Scilla, Chionodoxa, Puschkinia or Crocus. 
forced in an 6 inch bulb pan. 

To be staged Thursday, March 10: 

615 Tazetta Narcissus GERANIUM 
forced in an 8 inch bulb pan. 

616 Hyacinth QUEEN OF THE BLUES 
forced in an 6 inch bulb pan. 

617 Early Single Tulip DE Wet 
forced in an 8 inch bulb pan. 



Garden Club of America Symposium 


ART • COLOR 


FLOWERS 


Thursday, October 20, 


1960 • 2:30 P.M. 


Metropolitan Museum of Art | 


New York 


City 



DAFFODIL SHOW DATE SET 

The 1961 Dafifodil Show of the Pennsylvania 
Horticultural Society which is sponsored with the 
cooperation of the Greater Philadelphia members of 
the American Dafifodil Society will be staged on April 
19-20 in the Philadelphia National Bank, Broad and 
Chestnut Streets, Philadelphia. 

To increase competition in the small cup division, 
the show committee urges dafifodil enthusiasts to 
plant small cup varieties this fall. A panel of three — 
Dr. John C. Wister, Dr. Larry P. Mains and Charles 
H. Mueller — recommends the following varieties 
which are well suited to this area and are potential 
blue ribbon winners. All are inexpensive. 

Ill a. (perianth and cup colored) : Apricot Dis- 
tinction, Ardour, Chungking, Dinkie 

III b. (perianth white, cup yellow or red) : 
Blarney, Limerick, Kansas, Matapan. 

Ill c. (perianth and cup white) : Bryher, Chinese 
White, Cushendall, Silver Salver. 



NEW MEMBERSHIP 
CATEGORIES ESTABLISHED 

■ Three new categories of membership were ap- 

proved by the Executive Council of the Pennsylvania 
Horticultural Society at its regular meeting, Septem- 
ber 21. The purpose of this action is to enable mem- 
bers to take a greater part in the work of the Society, 
to contribute toward specific projects and programs 
and to help the Society move foreward to an increas- 
ingly active and effective future. 

In addition to the Annual Membership ($8.00), 
the Council has provided for a Family Membership 
which includes all members of the family living in 
one household ($14.00), a contributing membership 
which includes all of the benefits of Family Member- 
ship plus the opportunity to contribute to the program 
of the Society ($25.00), and a Sustaining Membership 
which includes Family Membership benefits and the 
opportunity to designate funds for particular projects 
such as books for the library, lecture programs, educa- 
tional exhibits or something the member might like 
to suggest ($50.00). 

While we have many problems to face in the 
immediate future ; such as, suitable housing which 
will enable the Society to stage a constant series of 
exhibits (particularly of growing plants which will 
not survive in our present, sunless quarters!), many 
suggestions have been made for the future : scholar- 
ships for students preparing to be horticulturists, 
funds for definite research programs which will seek 
answers for the ever existent problems of gardening, 
work with school children, traveling exhibits and 
many others. 

In the membership categories other than Annual 
and Life two tickets to all flower shows will be sent 
automatically ; additional tickets for other members 
of the family will be sent upon request. Garden 
Visits admissions will be handled in a similar fashion. 
Membership cards will have space on the back for 
listing the names of all members of the family. All 
memberships, of course, include subscriptions to the 
NEWS and HORTICULTURE in addition to the 
many other benefits. 

The Executive Council also made a change in 
Life Membership — ^it is now $250.00 in one payment. 
These memberships are put into the endowment funds 
of the Society to provide not only for immediate but 
also for future income. 

Membership renewal forms will carry more details 
on these changes. I urge you to give serious consid- 
eration to this opportunity to help carry forward the 
Society's program. 

Henry D. Mirick, 
President 



LIBRARY SUGGESTIONS 

(Book loans by mall 1o all members) 

The Gardener's Directory by J. W. Stephenson. 
(Hanover, 1960) 

A very worthwhile reference book in the field 
of horticulture. Lists among other things horti- 
cultural organizations in the U. S. (national, 
regional, state and local, and trade) places of 
horticultural interest in the U. S. (botanical gar- 
dens and arboretums, garden centers, traveler's 
guide,) calendar of horticultural events in the 
U. S. and sources for horticultural information 
and services. 

Garden Pools, Water-lilies, and Gold Fish by G. L. 

Thomas, Jr. (Van Nostrand, 1958) 

For some time there has been a need for a book 
on this subject. This one has been written by the 
proprietor of a large ornamental fish and water- 
lily business and tells how to plan, construct 
and care for all types of pools and grow aquatic 
plants. 

Design and Depth in Flower Arrangement by Emma 
Hodkinson Cyphers. (Hearthside, 1958.) 

Achieving 3-D and 4-D in flower arrangement 
and judging sculptural form is the theme of this 
volume. One chapter discusses the role of light 
in floral design, and the use of mobiles and niches 
are points of unusual interest. 

Weeds of the Northeast by C. E. Phillips. (Delaware 
Agricultural Experiment Station, 1956) 

Sub-titled Aids to Their Identification by Basal- 
Leaf Characteristics, Field Manual No. 1. — 346 
weeds described and well illustrated from draw- 
ings made from plants collected by the author. 

GARDEN CRUISE POPULAR WITH MEMBERS 

Over fifty members have booked passage aboard 
the M. S. Gripsholm for the Society's first Garden 
Cruise to Bermuda and Nassau which sails directly 
from Philadelphia at 11 :00 A. M., Wednesday, Novem- 
ber 9 and returns here the following Wednesday. 

In Bermuda, Mr. Gordon Groves, Director of 
Agriculture will take the cruise group on a tour of 
the Bermuda Botanical Garden. Members of the 
Bermuda Garden Club will decorate Verdmont with 
special flower arrangements. Here the group will have 
lunch ; in addition, two private gardens will be opened 
to the Society. 

The Nassau schedule includes several gardens 
and a visit to St. Augustine's Monastery to see water- 
colors of medicinal herbs and to hear how they are 
used by native Bahamians. Mr. Orris Russell, Director 
of Agriculture is expected to address the group after 
a buflfet supper in the tropical gardens of the Royal 
Victoria Hotel. 

Illustrated talks will be given aboard the Grips- 
holm by Carlton B. Lees, Director of our Society, 
who has been invited by the Carribean Cruise Lines 
to accompany the group as guest tour leader. 



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DATES to Mark on your CALENDAR 



OCTOBER 4 

"DRIED ARRANGEMENTS" 

Ruth Gannon 
Curator, Decorative Arts, Philadelphia Museum of Art 
2:00 P.M. Sheraton Hotel 

Miss Gannon is a widely known garden lecturer 
and author. In her Philadelphia program for the 
Society she will demonstrate the use of dried plant 
materials in arrangements, Shoji screens, table mats 
and in other ways. 

Free to Members and their guests. 
OCTOBER 12 GARDEN CLINIC: BULBS 
10 A. M. 389 Suburban Station 

Martha Ludes Garra will provide a wealth of 
information on flowering bulbs for gardening indoors 
and out. She will demonstrate potting techniques, 
explain the function of bulbs and their cultural needs. 

Register by using the clip-out coupon below. Send 
it. along with $1.00, to The Pennsylvania Horticultural 
Society, 389 Suburban Station, Philadelphia 3. 
Registrations will be accepted in the order received; 
confirmation will be made by return post card. This 
card must be presented at the clinic for which 
registration is made. 



GARDEN CLINIC 
REGISTRATION 

Please register me for the Bulb Clinic for 
Tuesday, October 12, 1960 (Registration fee 
$1.00) 

Name -. — 

Address — - ~ — 

Telephone _ - _ — — 

Your registration will be confirmed by return 
mail. 



OaOBER 12-13 

SYMPOSIUM en PENNSYLVANIA GARDENS 

Strawberry Mansion, Fairmount Park, Philadelphia 
This year's Symposium includes James D. Graham 
of the Rhode Island School of Design ; Dr. Robert C. 
Smith, Univ. of Pennsylvania ; Dr. Karl R. Friedman, 
President, Girard College; Carlton B. Lees, Director 
of our Society ; Dr. Hui-Lin Li of the Univ. of Penn- 
sylvania and Henry P. Mcllhenny, Curator, Decorative 
Arts, Philadelphia Museum of Art. 

For additional information write to: 
Mrs. B. H. Roberts, 8318 Seminole Avenue, Phila. 18. 

OCTOBER 21 ■ 23 

CHRYSANTHEMUM SHOW 

Swarthmore College Field House, Swarthmore, Pa. 

Friday 2 P. M. - 9 P. M. 

Saturday 10 A. M. - 9 P. M. 

Sunday 12 Noon - 5 P. M. 

This year's schedule calls for gardens which will 
suggest a manner in which a small suburban property 
might be developed to provide a comfortable and 
attractive outdoor living space. Special emphasis is 
being placed on trees and shrubs which provide year 
round interest and are easy to maintain. Chrysan- 
themums, of course, will be featured in all gardens. 

The arrangement schedule includes a unique class 
in which two identical containers will be used for a 
fresh and a dried arrangement. Two exhibitors may 
work together on each entry in this class. Other 
arrangements include spider mums., 'mums with 
mineral and many others. 

A wide variety of prize chrysanthemums speci- 
mens of all types will be on display as well as the 
popular Class 46 in which exhibitors grow potted 
'mums from cuttings obtained from the Society in May. 

The Chrysanthemum Show is something which 
the whole family will enjoy. Admission free, by 
ticket, to members; $1.00 to non-members and $.50 
to children. 



THE PENNSYLVANIA 
HORTICULTURAL 



SOCIET' 



1617 PENNSYLVANIA BOULEVARD 
PHILADELPHIA 3, PENNSYLVANIA 



*?^S^ 




VOL. I No. 9 



NOVEMBE.R I960 



CONSIDER ENVIRONMENT WHEN GARDENING INDOORS 



House plants can be divided into two groups : 
those which are placed in windows or other favorable 
places and are expected to grow, and perhaps to 
bloom, and those that are expected to provide only a 
decorative shape and a touch of greenery in an unlit 
corner. Typical of the latter group are the jungle 
plants with heavy, dark green leaves such as philo- 
dendron, sansevieria, Chinese evergreen, pothos and 
rubber plants. Palms and podocarpus will also main- 
tain their appearance under inhospitable surroundings. 

Plants such as these, when placed at a distance 
from windows, will remain dormant from fall until 
spring. During this period, correct management con- 
sists of actually keeping the plants from growing. 
Too much heat, too much water and all fertilizer must 
be avoided ; these encourage the weak, pale and un- 
sightly growth which occurs where light is insufficient. 

Toward the beginning of summer the plants 
should be moved to a shady place outdoors. There, 
the increased light and humidity will reactivate the 
photosynthetic process, and the plants will put forth 
new growth and store away food to last through the 
next long winter. 

FLOWERING PLANTS 

The other group — which includes all the best 
loved flowering plants for indoor growing — requires 
much more exacting care. Since growth and bloom 
are wanted, light, humidity and temperature are im- 
portant. Good bright light is essential for plant growth, 
and sunlight is necessary for blooming. It is because 
light is scarce during the winter that many indoor 
gardeners are disappointed with the paucity of the 
blooms on their flowering plants. 

The prescription for better growth and more 
flowers is not increased amounts of fertilizer but 
simply increased amounts of sunlight. In locations 
where there are five or six hours of direct sun each 
day, there are practically no plants which cannot be 
grown and few which cannot be brought into festive 
bloom. Contrary to the warnings sometimes seen, no 
amount of winter sun will harm any of the plants 
grown indoors. 

If a sunny window is not available, non-flowering 



foliage plants and ferns can be as effective, particularly 
when interspersed with forced bulbs many of which 
will bloom without benefit of sunlight. 

HUMIDITY 

Lack of humidity in the air will cause the desicca- 
tion and burning often blamed on sunlight. Only in 
the deserts is the air as dry as it is in the average 
American living room. The wise indoor gardener will 
take steps to compensate for this by placing pots on 
wet sand, pebbles or a similar medium and by wetting 
foliage and the air in the vicinity of the foliage with 
a fine spray of water to increase humidity. Three 
times a day would not be too often to do so, and once 
a day is practically a necessity if there is to be any 
appreciable change in the relative humidity of the air 
round the plants. Garden supply centers offer a 
variety of atomizers which can be used to spray a 
mist of water into the air. 

TEMPERATURE 

Plants grown on window sills are sometimes sub- 
jected to severe drops in the temperature if nights 
are cold. African violets, begonias and other natives 
of the tropics suffer serious setbacks if the temperature 
falls below 55° F., as it often does just, npxt to the 
glass. Soaring daytime temperatures seldom cause 
harm, but chilly nights can result in damage which 
often is not apparent but which may take weeks to 
overcome. Check the night temperature on your plant 
window sill on winter nights; if it is uncomfortably 
low, perhaps that will explain any difficulties you 
may be having. Plants from the sunny open plains of 
the subtropics grow well in places which are 
consistently cool at night. 

Knowledge of a plant's habitat will help in de- 
termining if it can be expected to grow or bloom 
indoors. Those from the tropics where the tempera- 
tures are consistently high are best for warm window 
sills and rooms, and plants from the rain forests need 
high humidity. Some of the epiphytes can live in 
fairly dry locations. Plants from the subtropics and 
from the mountains of the tropics where the night 
temperatures are lower are good choices for cooler 

(confinued next page] 



GARDENING INDOORS— (cont'd) 

locations. Plants which grow naturally in the north 
or south temperate zones are generally unsuitable for 
house culture because if the temperature of their roots 
and tops does not drop nearly to the freezing point 
in the winter, they are unable to grow indefinitely. 
To learn a plant's habitat, all that is necessary 
is to know the plant's botanical name; few are sold 
today without proper labels. Knowing the botanical 
name, you need only use one of the reference books 
found in the Society's library to find the plant's 
original home and detailed information about its 
culture. 

PLANT SUGGESTIONS 

For seasonal bloom, windows getting at least five 
hours of sunlight: browallia (B. speciosa major), oxalis, 
geraniums (including the several dwarf varieties), 
hibiscus and many begonias. The double-flowered 
semperflorens begonias are as prolific as the single 
and are more colorful. Begonia, Veitch's Carmine 
is a very satisfactory prolific variety. The unusually 
prolific Begonia prussen has been observed in bloom for 
thirty-seven months, continuously, by members of 
the William Penn Branch of The American Begonia 
Society. The hybrids of Begonia dichroa (Orange-rubra, 
Diana, Rubaiyat) also produce abundant flowers. 

For window sills having only two hours of sun- 
light, the following plants will provide color: African 
violets, lemon, cyclamen, kalanchoe and begonia 
Wooly Bear (6. leptotricha) . For little more money 
than a good sized plant of almost any kind would 
cost, you can buy a hundred paper-white narcissus 
which will produce a succession of flowers from 
Thanksgiving to Easter in a window having limited 
light. 

SNAKE CHARMER? 

An interesting note comes from a Pennsylvania 
Horticultural Society Member, Mrs. Kenneth E. Smith 
of Chestnut Hill. It seems that Mrs. Smith has a 
Carrion flower (Stapelia gigantea) which produces 
flowers fifteen inches in diameter. An African, cactus- 
like plant, it gets its common name because of the 
carrion odor of the flower. It commonly attracts flies, 
of course, but Mrs. Smith's plant apparently attracted 
a 16-18 inch long Garter snake. It came to the screen 
door and raised its head to peer indoors. When fright- 
ened away, it went around the corner of the house 
and returned when all was quiet again. The question 
is, was this snake charmed or hungry or merely 
looking for a warm wintertime home? 



From Members ... "I didn't know that soils 
could be so interesting," was one response. "You've 
cleared up so much of the confusion of lawn care," was 
another, and yet a third, "It is so much easier to under- 
stand when you see actual examples and demonstra- 
tions of how to do these things." These are but a few 
of the comments which have come from Members 
attending the Garden Clinics. Information about the 
next Garden Clinic appears on the back page. 



GIFT BOOKS FOR CHRISTMAS 

Anyone who is garden-minded will find these re- 
cent books informative and useful. They will be on 
display, along with others, in the library after Novem- 
ber 1 and will be available for examination through 
December 16. Order through the Society library or 
directly from National Council Books, Inc., Box 4965, 
Philadelphia 19, Pa. (GE 8-8263) Be sure to tell them 
that you are a member of the Society — 10% of the 
price of each book purchased through the Society is 
contributed to the library fund. 
GARDEN INDOORS 

Garden in Your House by Ernesta Drinker Ballard. 
(Harper, 1958) $5.95. 

The Complete Book of Flowers and Plants for Interior 
Decoration by Esther Wheeler and Anabel Combs 
Lasker. (Hearthside, 1957) $7.95. 
GARDENING 

Rock Garden Plants by Doretta Klaber. (Holt, 1959) 
$5.95. 

Easy Ways to a Beautiful Garden by Ruth Gannon. 
(Studio-Viking, 1959) $5.00. 

Peonies, Outdoors and In by Arno and Irene 
Nehrling. (Hearthside, 1960) $5.95. 

Old Roses for Modern Gardens by Richard Thomson. 
(Van Nostrand, 1959) $7.50. 

Gardening — New World for Children by Sally Wright. 
(Macmillan, 1957) $2.75. 
LANDSCAPING 

Budget Landscaping by Carlton B. Lees (Holt, 
1%0) $3.95. 

Landscape Gardens (Bliihende Garten) [Jardins en 
Fleurs) by Gustav Ammann. Text in French, Ger- 
man and English. (Verlag fur Architektur, Erlen- 
bach-Zurich, 1955) $10.00. (Allow at least two 
weeks for delivery) 

New Gardens (Neue Garten) by Ernst Baumann. 
English translation by James Hull. Text in German 
and English. (Editions Girsberger Zurich, 1955) 
$11.50 (Allow at least two weeks for delivery.) 
REFERENCES 

America's Garden Book by James Bush-Brown and 
Louise Bush-Brown. (Charles Scribner's Sons, 
1958) $7.95. 

National Garden Book [The Woman's Home Companion 
Garden Book) edited by John C. Wister. (Greystone 
Press, revised 1959) $4.95. 

10,000 Garden Questions Answered by 20 Experts 
edited by F. F. Rockwell. (Doubleday, 1959) $5.95. 
FLOWER ARRANGING 

Religious Themes in Flower Arrangement by Ruth 
E. Mullins. (Hearthside, 1959) $5.95. 

New Complete Book of Floiver Arrangement by F. F. 
Rockwell and Esther C. Gravson. (Doubleday, 1960) 
$5.95. 

Japanese Flower Arrangement Classical and Modern 
by Norman J. Sparnon. (Charles E. Tuttle Co.. 
1960) $15.00 

Art of Drying Plants and Flowers by Mabel Squires. 
(Barrows, 1958) $4.50. 

Corsage Craft by Mary Nobel and Gladys Reusch. 
(Van Nostrand, 1960) $495. 



CHRISTMAS SHOW: 1960 

New emphasis is being placed on the use of 
materials of plant origin in this year's Christmas 
Show. For The Horticultural Society, this approach 
demonstrates yet another way in which to bring the 
outdoors — garden, fields and woods — indoors. 
Branches, foliage, pods, cones, seedheads and other 
materials of plant origin provide a richness to Christ- 
mas decorations which is difficult to achieve with 
purely man-made materials. 

To add a festive note, to emphasize elegance and 
to bring a decorative composition into focus with its 
setting, gilding, painting and other treatment of 
materials of plant origin is sometimes necessary. When 
this is done most successfully, however, the treatment 
never overshadows the material or eclipses good taste. 
In the schedule below, treated materials can be used 
in all classes unless otherwise stated. Artificial mater- 
ials — ornaments, fruits, glass bulbs, etc. — may also 
be used, of course, in combination with the materials 
of plant origin unless otherwise stated. 

All entries must be staged by 11 :00 A.M., Monday, 
December 5, 389 Suburban Station Bldg. All classes 
are open to everyone. (continued next column) 

COUNCIL NOMINATIONS ANNOUNCED 

The following members have been nominated and 
have consented to serve for another three year term 
on the Executive Council of The Pennsylvania Horti- 
cultural Society. Their names will be presented for 
election at the Annual Meeting on November 16, 1960. 
Mrs. E. Page Allinson Richard H. L. Sexton 

Dr. John M. Fogg, Jr. Miss Estelle L. Sharp 

George Wood Furness William H. Weber 

Frederick W. G. Peck John G. Williams 

Nominated to fill two vacancies on the Executive 
Council were Ernesta Drinker Ballard (Mrs. Frederic 
L. Ballard, Jr.) and Richard Thomson. 

Mrs. Ballard is author of Garden in Your House, 
has lectured for the Society for several years, is cur- 
rently involved in the Garden Clinics program, and 
has staged several informative exhibits of indoor 
plants. 

Mr. Thomson, author of Old Roses for Modern 
Gardens, is currently President of The Garden Writers 
Association of America and is a member of the Board 
of Commissioners of Lower Merion Township and in 
that capacity is Chairman, Parks and Playgrounds 
Committee. 

CHRISTMAS SHOPPING? 

Isn't there someone on your Christmas list who 
would find a membership in the Pennsylvania Horti- 
cultural Society useful? Young home owners would 
welcome lawn maintenance information and plant 
suggestions found in the NEWS and in HORTICUL- 
TURE ; ideas from the Chrysanthemum Show, Phila- 
delphia Flower Show and the Garden Visits ; access 
to a valuable horticultural library — all of this and 
more you'd be giving. A Family Membership ($14) 
would put a merjy jingle into Christmas! 



SCHEDULE 

1. Christmas Table — breakfast, luncheon or dinner 
(tables 5 feet x 3 feet, 8 inches provided; table 
must be covered). Limited to four entries. 

2. Arrangement using a religious figure. 

3. Centerpiece for a children's party. 

4. Wreath for a front door. 

5. A door decoration other than a wreath. 

6. Hall decoration featuring holly and/or natural 
cones. 

7. Arrangement or composition suitable for center 
or side of a mantel. 

8. Small Christmas tree featuring natural materials, 
(maximum height 30 inches.) 

9. Small Christmas tree featuring treated materials. 
(maximum height 30 inches.) 

10. A Christmas package, decorated. 

11. Composition featuring a candle or candles. 

12. Novelty not included in the above classes such 
as a corsage, boutonniere, decorated place card, 
animal or bird forms crafted by the exhibitor and 
using materials of plant origin. 

13. Christmas arrangement featuring fresh and/or 
artificial fruit to be staged on a pedestal 41% 
inches high ; limited to six entries. (Top surface 
of pedestal 15 x 15 inches) 

RULES 

1. All exhibits must be staged by 11 A.M. Monday, 
December 5, and may be removed after 1 P.M. 
Friday, December 9. 
2. Classes are open to everyone whether members of 
the Society or not. 

3. Only one entry per class allowed. 

4. Ground Pine and Dogwood are prohibited from 
use. 

5. Plant material must be used in all classes. Some 
artificial materials may be used unless otherwise 
stated. 

6. The decision of the Judges will be final. 
Assistance in unloading will be provided. 
Exhibitors will be re-imbursed for parking fees. 

AWARDS 

Awards shall consist of ribbons. A cash prize of 
$5.00 will be awarded to the most outstanding 
exhibit in the show. 



CHRISTMAS SHOW ENTRY BLANK 

(Clip out and mail to 389 Suburban Station Bldg. 
by December 1, 1960) 

Please reserve space for my entry in the 
following classes : 



Name 

Address 

Telephone 

Garden Club 



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DATES to mark on your CALENDAR 



NOVEMBER 10 

GARDEN CLINIC: 

10:00 A.M. 



GARDENING INDOORS 

389 Suburban Station Bldg. 



Erne.sta Drinker Ballard will give the facts, show 
plants and demonstrate techniques for gardening 
indoors. 

Register by using the clip-out coupon below. Send 
it, along with $1.00, to The Pennsylvania Horticultural 
Society, 389 Suburban Station, Philadelphia 3. 
Registrations will be accepted in the order received ; 
confirmation will be made by return post card. This 
card must be presented at the clinic for which 
registration is made. 

NOVEMBER 15-17 

ORCHID GROWING STEP BY STEP 

9 A. M. - 6 P. M. daily 389 Suburban Station Bldg. 

Englebert Frakowiak, well known for his orchids 
in the Philadelphia area, will show them from seed to 
bloom. Basic cultural information will be available for 
orchid enthusiasts and potential amateur growers. 
Orchid literature and orchid arrangements will also be 
on display. This exhibit will coincide with the Annual 
Meeting on November 16. 



NOVEMBER 16 



3:00 P.M. 



ANNUAL MEETING 

389 Suburban Station Bldir. 



This is the one time each year in which all mem- 
bers have a chance to meet with the Executive Council, 
to hear the reports of the Society's progress during 
the year and to make suggestions for the future. At 
the end of this year's meeting a special report on the 
Society's first garden cruise will be given. The orchid 
exhibit will be on view and refreshments will be served. 



DECEMBER 5 ■ 9 

CHRISTMAS SHOW 

389 Suburban Station Bldg. 



Philadelphia 



Monday 

Tuesday, Thursday 

Wednesday 

Friday 



1 :00 - 5 :00 P.M. 
9:00 A.M. -5:00 P.M. 
9:00 A.M. -7:30 P.M. 
9:00 A.M. -1:00 P.M. 



An annual affair, always popular with members 
and their friends, and always a rich source for ideas 
for your own Christmas decorating. 

See page 3 for Schedule and Rules. 

If you have some ideas, please enter. If you have 
a friend, member or non-member, encourage her to 
enter too. 

Staged with the co-operation of The Planters and 
The Jr. Providence Garden Clubs. 



GARDEN CLINIC 

REGISTRATION 

Please register me for Indoor Gardening for 
Thursday, November 10, 1960 (Registration fee 
$1.00) 

Name ~ - — 

Telephone -. 

Your registration will be confirmed by return 
mail. 



THE PENNSYLVANIA 



HORTICULTURAL 



SOCIET' 



1617 PENNSYLVANIA BOULEVARD 
PHILADELPHIA 3. PENNSYLVANIA 



J^K? 




VOL I No. 10 



DECEMBER I960 



HOLLIES FOR YOUR OWN MERRY CHRISTMAS 



The red-berried hollies have been long associated 
with Christmas and other holidays. The first holidays 
were "holy days" and it is possible that the word holly 
is a corruption of holy. Holly indoors, is most satis- 
factory when freshly cut from well cultured, local 
plants, so what could be more satisfying than growing 
and cutting it in your own garden? 

Since English holly has more glossy leaves than 
its American counterpart it is generally preferred by 
most gardeners. From the nurseryman's standpoint 
however, English holly takes longer to grow and is 
more hazardous, the small plants being less hardy. 
While some English hollies fruit abundantly every 
year, American hollies fruit more heavily and more 
regularly than do English hollies as a group. If you 
are so unfortunate as to have only one plant which 
is male, you will have to be satisfied with foliage alone. 
\\'ith many hollies, foliage alone is good enough to 
make them highly desirable plants, and many such 
plants are prized in England. Besides English and 
American hollies, other red-berried species can be 
grown in the Delaware Valley such as Ilex cornuta, 
I. pernyi, I. pedunculosa and less common ones such as 
Ilex chinensis, I. rugosa and /. yunnanensis. 

SOIL AND FERTILIZER 

American holly does best in a slightly acid soil, 
at a pH of aljout 6.2. The English and Chinese hollies 
do best in a neutral soil (pH7). 

Unfortunately many gardeners are convinced that 
hollies are slow growing. Hollies that are in poor soil 
and are underfed are slow growers, but if they are 
planted with plenty of peat, oakleaf mold, compost 
or other suitable humus in large well prepared holes 
and if fertilized regularly and heavily, the results are 
amazing. Hollies are heavy feeders and given proper 
nutrients will make exceedingly fast growth. A six 
foot American holly, in one season, has been known 
to grow to a height of ten feet. 

It is difficult to recommend a best fertilizing 
material. Good results can he ol^tained with a 10-10-10 
or a 10-6-4 fertilizer (])referably one containing urea- 
form nitrogen) and a li1)eral application of chicken or 
turkey manure every three years. Prepared fertilizers 



for broadleaf evergreens are more convenient and are 
readily available and easy to use but also should be 
supplemented with poultry manure or at least a suit- 
able mulch. The fertilizer should be spread in a circle 
just within the spread of the branches to at least a 
foot outside. For a six foot tree, use about two pounds 
for a three foot tree, about one pound. Apply the 
fertilizer during the last two weeks in March, the 
manure in January or February. 

Hollies are usually underpruned as well as under 
fed. In the early stages, they should be pruned regu- 
larly and sometimes drastically. Early to mid-winter 
pruning is satisfactory for older plants (very handy 
for the Christmas season!) in addition to mid-summer 
pruning for younger ones. Drastic side pruning often 
encourages the growth of a strong central leader in 
American holly. Some gardeners aid leader develo])- 
ment by staking. 
FRUIT PRODUCTION 

A characteristic that has accounted for slow pub- 
lic acceptance of hollies is the sex factor, whjch com- 
plicates holly culture. Some plants bear only male 
flowers and some only female ; only those having fe- 
male flowers produce berries. To get a good berry 
producer, be sure to buy plants grown from cuttings 
which have come from fruiting plants and from a 
reliable dealer who knows the source of his plants. 
(This is assuming the plant is not heavy with fruit 
at the time of purchase, of course.) 

The sex of plants without fruit on them can be 
determined only while they are in flower. Both male 
and female flowers contain the essential parts. While 
in the female flowers the pistil is functional and able 
to receive pollen, the stamens are aborted or under- 
developed and therefore are nonfunctional. In the 
male flowers the stamens are pollen bearing and 
functional; the pistil is not developed. 

Bees, flies and other insects carry pollen from one 
plant to another, so the one bearing male flowers need 
not be immediately adjacent to the female. In general, 
it is helpful if male plants are placed to the \\-indward 
side of the female holly trees to take advantage of 
wind borne ])ollen as well as that carried by insects. 

(continued next page) 



GARDEN CLINICS SCHEDULE FOR 1961 

Eight Garden Clinics have been scheduled for the 
first five months of the new year. This is an oppor- 
tunit}' to obtain up-to-date, on-the-spot information in 
a practical and understandable manner. 

Only members of the Society are eligible to regis- 
ter for clinics. For details, see the back page. Addi- 
tional information on each clinic will be given on the 
back page of the NEWS as the time of the event 
approaches. 

Dates, topics and places: 
Saturday, January 21 : 

Planting Design — the use of Evergreens, Swarth- 
more 
Saturday, February 18: 

The Small Home Greenhouse, Chestnut Hill 
Saturday, March 18: 

Lawn Care, Ardmore 

Saturday, March 25 : 

Pruning (including roses), Morris Arboretum 

Thursday, April 6 : 

Growing, Vegetables at Home, Ambler 

Tuesday, April 11 : 

Spraying to Control Plant Pests, Gladwynne 

Wednesday, May 10: 

Planting for Late Season Color, Ambler 

Wednesday, May 24: 

Year-round Use of Your Coldframe, Gladwynne 



Garden Tip . . . ifrom the garden of 

Mt. and Mrs. Charles Becker, Jr., Haverford. 

To grow lilies from seed to flower in one season, 
try Formosa Lily {L. formosianum) . This is a white, 
trumpet lily bearing flowers five to six inches long and 
flushed wine-purple on the outside. It grows about 
four feet tall. 

Start the seed indoors in January. Sow on vermi- 
culite and keep in a warm place until the seedlings 
are evident. Feed with Rapid-Gro, Gro-stuf or a simi- 
lar water soluble fertilizer (the vermiculite is sterile 
and contains no nutrients) and transplant the seedlings 
into individual small pots as soon as large enough to 
handle. (Exceptionally light weight plastic pots which 
fit neatly into plastic trays are now available in in- 
expensive sets from garden supply outlets.) Use a 
regular potting mixture (1/3 garden soil, 1/3 compost 
or peat, 1/3 sand). Feed weekly and keep in a cool, 
sunny window. 

Transplant to the garden when frost danger has 
passed. Select a site having full sunlight for at least 
half the day and feed regularly. 

The Formosa lily is sometimes incorrectly listed 
as L. philippense formosianum or L. longiflorum formosan- 
ium. In Bailey's Manual of Cultivated Plants (1949) 
it is given species standing: Lilum formosianum. Seeds 
are available from : Harry E. Saier, Diamondale, Mich., 
and George Park Seed Co., Greenwood, South Carolina. 



FIRST YEAR OF THE NEWS 
COMES TO AN END 

With this issue we complete the first volume of 
the NEWS. Although it was started with the March 
issue, to keep in pace with the years ahead, it has 
been decided to start volume II with the New Year. 

Many members of the Society have expressed 
their pleasure with these four pages. Some have offered 
suggestions for articles which have been included. 
Several have remarked that they are keeping all copies 
in a ring binder. We have been asked why we don't 
have the copies punched before mailing. Part of the 
answer is that ring binders differ in placement of the 
rings and the appearance of the sheet would be altered 
as received, but the most important reason, is that 
we really feel that this is news, fresh and up-to-date. 
It is for the present. While some of the information 
may have value of longer duration we must also recog- 
nize that new techniques, new materials, new varieties 
and new products come along constantly in horticul- 
ture, so even information which seems of long term 
value may be out dated in a year or two. 

In addition to the staff, several members of the 
Society have contriljuted important articles to the 
NEWS during its first year. The}-^ are: Mrs. Francis 
H. Scheetz, Mrs. J. Folsom Paul, Mrs. Edward J. 
Garra, Mrs. Frederic L. Ballard, Jr., Dr. John C. 
Swartley. 

Henry D. Mirick, 
President 



THE NEWS TRAVELS FAR 

Barely nine months old, the Society's NEWS has 
engendered many comments from members and from 
professional horticulturists throughout the country, 
but a new record was set by a postcard which arrived 
on Halloween Day requesting a free copy of the 
NEWS. It was sent by a Professor of Agriculture in 
Moscow, U.S.S.R. A complete set of the NEWS and 
a letter explaining our Society, how it functions, and 
its purposes was sent in reply ; it is hoped that we 
might learn something amout ornamental horticulture 
in U.S.S.R. to report in the future. 



". . . an appreciation of natural things is 
a cornerstone of man's cultural and scientific 
progress." 

Henry T. Skinner, 

Director of the U. S. National Arboretum, 

Washington, D. C. 

from an address commemorating the 25th anniversary of 
the Bowman's Hill Wildflower Preserve, October 1959 



CHRISTMAS HOLLIES— (cont'd) 

One male plant in flower will supply enough pollen 
for twelve to fifty females depending upon the vigor 
of the plant. If you have a holly which produces 
female flowers and does not have a male plant nearby, 
as a temporary measure to insure a good crop of fruit, 
you can cut a few branches from a male plant when 
it is in bloom. Put these in a container of water near 
the female plant and the insects will do the rest. It 
is necessary, of course, to have a generous friend who 
happens to have a male plant and will share some 
branches. 

VARIETIES 

A frequent question concerns varieties : is there 
really much difference in named varieties? Granted 
that far too many holly variations .have been given 
names, there is no doubt that there are several dozen 
American holly varieties and several dozen English 
varieties, which are really superior to run-of-the-mill 
seedlings. Especially is this true for American holly, 
which is so often characterized by anemic or blotched 
leaves and poor fruiting characteristics. Like apples, 
some liollies are biennial bearers, producing a good 
cro]i of berries only every other year. Some flower 
and fruit while still small in size, others produce 
nothing for more than ten years. There is considerable 
difl'erence in the size and color of the fruit and in its 
abundance, in leaf color, gloss, size and shape, and 
in the conformation of branches and habit of growth. 

Following are a tew choice varieties, all female 
unless otherwise indicated — 
American holly varieties: (Ilex opaca) 

P Arden Hedgeholly 

David (male) Manig 

Clark Maryland Dwarf 

Cumberland Miss Helen 

Emily Old Heavy Berry 

Parage \'ictory 
English holly varieties: (Ilex aquifolium) 

Altaclarensis Lichtenthal 

Argentea marginata Marnocki 

Barnes Male Teufel's Hybrid 

Belgica W. J. Bean 

Camelliaefolia Wilsonii 

(or ciliata-major) (needs protected site) 
Jan van Tol 
Chinese holly varieties: (Ilex coniuta) 

Burford Rotunda (sterile) 
Le Mac 

Hybrids : 

Ilex aquipernyi — several male and female cloves 

including Brilliant 
Ilex opaca hyb. Foster No. 2 
Ilex conuila hyb. Nellie Stevens 

While holly plants are often expensive, a great 
deal of it is being grown today and competition may 
well lower prices in the future. Also, you can buy 
small plants and apply patience plus good cultural 
practices to grow your own to maturity. Given a few 
years, they will add a bright. Merry Christmas to 
vour garden too. 



LIBRARY SUGGESTIONS 

Your Garden in Town by Ruth M. Peters. (Holt, 1957) 

Whether gardening on the ground or in the 
sky, in a garden plot or only a pot or mobile 
container, this book offers suggestions and lists 
much suitable plant material along with practical 
growing suggestions. 

A Pictorial Guide to American Gardens by Louis H. 
Frohman and Jean Elliot. (Crown, 1960) 

Almost all public and private gardens which are 
open to the public — all year or at some special 
season — are listed by state. Information for 
visiting each garden and descriptions, of each are 
accompanied by many illustrations, some in full 
color, which add to the enjoyment of this book 
and make it more than just a directory. 

The Romance of Daffodils by William C. Brumbach. 
(Greenwich. 1959) 

Written by a former member of the Pennsyl- 
vania Horticultural Society who has spent his life 
collecting daffodils in the U. S. and all over the 
world, this book tells the story from the earliest 
time to present date. A very brief but interesting 
account of personal experiences. 

Religious Themes in Flower Arrangement 1iy Ruth E. 

Muilins. (Hearthside, 1959) 

Assuming that the reader knows the funda- 
mentals of flower arrangement the author dis- 
cusses plant materials symbolic of many religious 
themes and their adaptation to particular doctrines 
in public or private use. 

Ornamental Crab Apples i)y Arie F. Den Boer. 
(American Association of Nurserymen, 1959) 

This volume is divided into three parts : I: Cul- 
tivation n. Descrpition with accompanying illus- 
trations of flowers and fruits II L Very complete 
listing of variety names — common, botanical and 
some synonyms. Mr. Boer has drawn leaves, fruits 
and flowers for identification and tells how to use 
various types of crab apples for different purposes. 

The Evergreens l)y James H. Beale. (Doubleday, 1960) 

Evergreens for all parts of the country are in- 
cluded. Identification, hardiness and planting and 
pruning care is detailed. 

Woodforms and Dry Materials. Naida G. Hayes 
(Hayes Studio. 1960) 

Forty-eight pages of brief text accompanied by 
black and white illustrations are presented in- 
cluding the use of accessories with dried arrange- 
ments. 



PHILADELPHIA FLOWER SHOW 
March 5-11, 1961 

This year's flower show 
opens at 1:00 P.M. on Sunday. 



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DATES to mark on 
GARDEN CLINICS 

NOVEMBER 30 (Wednesday) 

PLANT PROPAGATION 

6:30 P.M. 389 Suburban Station Bldg. 

Want to learn how to grow azaleas, broadleaf 
evergreens, flowering shrubs and other plants from 
cuttings and seed? Hardy woody plants, indoor plants 
and tender annuals will be discussed by Ernesta 
Drinker Ballard. 

JANUARY 21 (Saturday) 

PLANTING DESIGN: THE USE OF EVERGREENS 

2:00 P. AI. Swarthmore College Campus 

Taking advantage of the large collection of ever- 
greens of the Arthur Hoyt Scott Horticultural Foun- 
dation, Martha Ludes Garra will analyze and discuss 
the ways in which they are best used. Cultural and 
growth factors will be included. 

Register by using the clip-out coupon below. Send 
it, along with $1.00 for each Clinic, to 389 Suburban 
Station. Philadelphia 3. Registrations will be accepted 
in the order received ; confirmation will be made by 
return post card. 



GARDEN CLINIC 

REGISTRATION 

Please register me for the Garden 
Clinic(s) checked below. (Registration fee 
$1.00) 

n Plant Propagation Nov. 30, 1960 

□ The Use of Evergreens Jan. 21, 1961 

Name 

Address 

Telephone „ 

Your registration will be confirmed by 
return mail. 



your CALENDAR 

DECEMBER 5 • 9 

CHRISTMAS SHOW 

389 Suburban Station Bldg. Philadelphia 

Monday 1 :00 - 5 :00 P.M. 

Tuesday, Thursday 9:00 A.M. - 5 :00 P.M. 

Wednesday ' 9:00 A.M. - 7:30 P.M. 

Friday 9:00 A.M. - 1 :00 P.M. 

New emphasis is being placed in the use of 
materials of plant origin in this year's show. The 
committee has provided a diversified schedule with 
many interesting classes to enter and to see. 

Why not bring a guest to the Christmas Show 
this year? 

Staged with the co-operation of The Planters and 
The Junior Providence Garden Clubs. 
JANUARY 24 (Tuesday) 

MORE BIRDS FOR YOUR GARDEN 

an illustrated lecture by 

Charles E. Mohr 

2:00 P.M. Pennsylvania Rooms, Sheraton Hotel 

Mr. Mohr is Director of the Swiss Pines Park a 
new nature and horticultural center near Valley Forge, 
Pa. For twelve years, Mr. Mohr directed the National 
Audubon Society's year-round educational center at 
Greenwich, Conn. A nationally known nature photog- 
rapher, his work has appeared in Life, National Geo- 
graphic and many other magazines. 

A part of Mr. Mohr's talk will be devoted to the 
effect of insecticides on birdlife. a topic of much inter- 
est to horticulturists, both amateur and professional. 

Members may bring guests. 

FEBRUARY 2 (Thursdav) 

GARDEN WITH IMAGINATION 

Carlton B. Lees 
Director, Penna. Horticultural Society 
8:00 P.M. First Baptist Church, Wayne 

Sponsored jointly with The Community Garden 
Club of Wayne and open to the public. 



THE PENNSYLVANIA 
HORTICULTURAL 



SOCIETY 



1617 PENNSYLVANIA BOULEVARD 
PHILADELPHIA 3. PENNSYLVANIA 




J^ffO MARt* 



VOL II No. I 



JANUARY. 1961 



SMALL FLOWERING TREES PROVIDE GARDEN COLOR 



The best of the small flowering trees, without 
exception, is our native dogwood {Cornus florida). 
Beautiful in bloom, rich in fall color and adaptable 
to an incredible variety of uses as a decorative element 
in the landscape, it is so well known that it is really 
unnecessary to extoll its virtues at great length. Yet, 
because it surrounds us in such abundance, we some- 
times fail to recognize dogwood's importance in the 
building of a garden. 

Other flowering trees of merit deserve a greater 
popularity than they receive. While there are many 
which are exceptional for a particular characteristic, 
such as flowers, fruits or autumn color, the following 
ten stand near the head of the list for their combined, 
year-round, good qualities. These include not only 
distinction in flowers, fruit and/or autumn color, but 
also summer foliage, structure, winter appearance, 
insect and disease resistance, longevity, ease of culture, 
usefulness in the small as well as in the large garden, 
availability and cost. The ten trees described below 
are listed alphabetically simply to avoid prejudicial 
order of selection. 

SHADE LOW {Amelanchier canadensis). Before 
the great burst of other JMay-born blooms, amelanchier 
produces al^undant white flowers in upright clusters, 
and in early summer red berries ornament this slender 
graceful tree. As the new foliage unfurls, it is a silvery- 
gray color. This is a native tree and. therefore, is at 
home on the edge of woods, in a naturalistic garden 
or near a background of pine and hemlock. 

YELLOW WOOD (Cladrastis lutea) . Larger than 
most small trees, yellow wood grows to thirty or forty 
feet and is more useful as a shade tree than smaller 
sorts. It has beautifully smooth, gray bark like a beech 
and is draped in hanging clusters of white, fragrant 
flowers in May which resemble those of white wisteria. 
It needs sun. thrives in deep, rich soil with plenty of 
moisture, but will tolerate varied soil conditions. 

CHINESE DOG\\'OOD (Cornus kousa chinensis). 
More refined and somewhat more upright than our 
native dogwood, this species blooms a month later. 



early in June, after the foliage has appeared. It also 
becomes the same flaming scarlet and crimson as the 
native species but a month later, and it holds its color 
until mid-November. This is a choice tree for a small 
terrace, for garden background, or for use against 
tall evergreens. 

GOLDEN-RAIN TREE {Koeheuteria paniculata). 

This is one of the very few trees producing truly 
yellow flowers (Laburnum is another) in early sum- 
mer. They are followed by decorative seed pods. 
Since it usually develops a picturesque semi-umbrella 
form this tree is especially suitable as a small shade 
tree of unique interest. 

SWEETBAY (Magnolia virginiana). A slender, 
usually multiple-trunked tree, sweetbay bears waxy 
white, fragrant flowers in May and June and produces 
red seed pods in early autumn. The long leaves are 
lustrous green above and whitish underneath. The 
interesting branch and foliage pattern, resembling an 
enlarged bamboo, is especially effective against a house 
or fence and as an informal accent or allee subject. 
(Still often listed, incorrectly, as Magnolia glauca.) 

JAPANESE FLOWERING CRABAPPLE 
(Malus floribunda). It is difficult to choose only one of 
the dozens of fine varieties of crabapples but this one 
is the standard by which others are judged. A densely 
branched mound, twenty to thirty feet high at matur- 
ity, it is covered in May with pink to white flowers. 
In autumn it produces red to yellow fruits. A splendid 
dense tree for screen planting or as a lawn specimen, 
it needs sun. At maturity skillful pruning of excess 
growth can result in a Japanesque bonzai form. 

SORRELL TREE (Oxydendrum arboreum). A 
flawless tree when well grown, with white flowers 
similar to Japanese pieris in summer, strikingly bril- 
liant red foliage in the fall, lustrous leathery leaves of 
medium texture, and a structural habit of great char- 
acter. A very mature specimen may reach over forty 
feet but usually it is seen as a tree of twenty to twenty- 

(continued next page) 



SMALL FLOWERING TREES— {cont'd) 

five feet tall. It is beautiful silhouetted against a 
house or as a specimen lawn or garden tree. 

KWANZAN ORIENTAL CHERRY (Prunus 
serrulata kivanzan). This upright, vase-shaped tree 
rarely exceeds twenty-five feet in height, and looks 
like an immense bouquet of pink popcorn in late April. 
With blackish bark and golden autumn foliage it is 
striking at several seasons of the year. The foliage is 
dense enough to provide shade for a terrace. There 
are many other Oriental cherries but this is one of the 
hardiest, one of the most beautiful and is deservedly 
popular. 

JAPANESE PAGODA TREE (Soplwra japonica) . 
One of the last of the trees to bloom it produces large 
terminal clusters of creamy yellow, pea-like flowers 
in August. The foliage is fine and fern-like in texture. 
It withstands difficult growing conditions better than 
most trees and makes an excellent shade tree under 
which grass will grow well. For those who are at 
home to enjoy their gardens in the fullness of summer, 
this tree provides ample reward. 

JAPANESE SNOWBELL {Styrax japonica). In 
early June, after the flush of early blooming crab- 
apples, dogwood, and cherries, styrax is an especial 
pleasure. A vase-shaped tree up to thirty feet tall but 
usually nearer twenty feet, it spreads out at maturity 
to an umbrella shape broader than high. The fragrant 
white flowers hang in what seems a million bells along 
every twig. It prefers sun and good soil but seems to 
hold its own under difficult conditions. This is a fine 
allee tree or background for terrace or shrub border. 



ART FORMS IN FOREST, FIELD AND GARDEN 

a special exhibit of 

Paintings, graphics, and drawings of 

Erick Hans Krause 

January 15 - April 16, 1961 

at the 

Philadelphia Academy of Natural Sciences 

(The Hall of Changing Exhibits) 

Mr. Krause, of the faculty of The University 
of Rochester (N. Y.), finds his inspirations in 
the world of plants, animals, shells and other 
nature forms. Some of these objects will be 
displayed with his work. 

Mr. Krause will be present on January 
15, from 3-5 o'clock, to greet members of 
the Horticultural Society and of the Academy. 
Members of the Society will be guests of the 
Academy and will be admitted on the open- 
ing day by showing their membership cards. 



OUR SOCIETY MOVES FORWARD 

Many progressive changes were made during 1960 
by The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society to enable 
it to move into a more vigorous future. This first 
complete year with our new Director brought many 
new accomplishments: the introduction and continuing 
success of the NEWS, the oversubscribed and ex- 
tremely popular Garden Clinics ; Azalea Day and the 
Azalea Garden Guide ; participation in Floriade, the 
international horticultural exposition at Rotterdam ; 
the Bermuda-Nassau garden cruise. It also brought 
participation in civic and regional activities, such as 
the plantings for Penn Center and the Information 
Center, and the Strawbridge & Clothier Award for 
Horticultural Activity for Community Benefit. A new 
look has come to our letterheads, flower show sched- 
ules and other printed matter. Our seal has been 
updated and given new importance. 

Through our Director, the Society has a personal 
representative to work in co-operation with important 
national, regional and local organizations. Through 
his book. Budget Landscaping, and articles in Horticulture, 
Popular Gardening, The New York Times and other pub- 
lications, the Society gains additional recognition. He 
also serves as our representative to Greater Delaware 
Valley civic and community organizations and to 
garden clubs and other groups near and far. 

One of the most important of the accomplishments 
of 1%0 is the establishment of a more comprehensive 
schedule of memberships to fit the new needs of the 
individual and the Society as a whole. 

Many steps forward have been made ; many are 
to come which will enable us to play an increasingly 
dynamic and progressive role in the years ahead. We 
are over 5,000 strong, but we need more members to 
help carry the Society into the future so that we can 
meet the even greater challenges which are ahead. I 
urge you to tell your friends that you are a member 
of The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society. Ask them 
if they are members, too. If not, tell them about our 
library service by mail, our consulting services, flower 
show tickets, special exhibits and all the other fruits 
of membership. Urge them to join so they may enjoy 
the benefits of the changes of 1960 and can take part 
in those of the years ahead. 

Henry D. Mirick 
President 



SMALL HANDBOOKS FROM THE PAST 
1534 - 1732 

A group of small handbooks containing practical 
information on gardening, farming, distillation and 
remedies covering nearly two centuries are on display 
in the library of the Horticultural Society, 389 Subur- 
ban Station Building. They are from the Society's 
Helen Wingate Lloyd collection of old and rare books 
on horticulture, botany and related topics. 



AWARD PRESENTED TO MRS. HENRY 

Mrs. J. Norman Henry of Gladwynne, for many 
years a member of the Executive Council and a life 
member of The Pennsj'lvania Horticultural Society, 
received one of the six citations presented at the 15th 
Annual American Horticultural Congress to individ- 
uals who have performed special service to horticul- 
ture. The citation was presented in Pasadena, 
California on November 11 and reads in part: 

"for collecting and evaluating wild North 
American plants for use in gardens and for 
establishing their cultivation and reporting 
on their relative value as ornamental garden 
plants." 

Mrs. Henry now serves on the Honorary Advisory 
Committee of The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society. 

Receiving citations with Mrs. Henry were: Karl 
Sax of the Arnold Arboretum ; Dr. Philip A. Munz, 
Director Emeritus of the Rancho Santo Ana Botanic 
Gardens ; Gretchen Harshbarger, Mid-west Garden 
Editor of American Home Magazine ; Jacques Legen- 
dre of Gulf Stream Nursery ; William Hertrich, 
Director Emeritus of the Huntington Botanic Gardens. 

The third Liberty Hyde Bailey Medal Award 
was conferred upon Dr. H. Harold Hume of Gaines- 
ville, Florida for important contributions as a leader in 
ornamental horticultural in the southeastern states. 



PHILADELPHIA FLOWER SHOW 
March 5-11, 1961 

(This year's Flower Show opens at 1 :00 
P. M. on Sunday). 

In the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society 
section: 

... all ARRANGEMENT CLASS entries 
must be received by Monday, February 6, 
1961. 

... all HORTICULTURAL CLASS entries 
must be received by Wednesday, February 
15, 1961. 

Members entering the amateur horticul- 
tural classes calling for plants (pansies, 
violas, cuttings) to be shown in cedar flats 
(13"x9"x3") may obtain them directly from 
the Society. The price is 50c plus 2c tax. They 
may be picked up in the rooms of the Society. 



IN THE LIBRARY 

New Illustrated Encyclopedia of Gardening. 
(Greyston, 1960) 

This encyclopedia (consisting of six volumes Li- 
brary edition or 14 volumes National Garden Society 
edition) covers subjects related to gardening from 
Aaron's Beard to Zygopetalum with more than 16,000 
subjects between including trees, shrubs, flowering 
plants, bulbs, fruits and vegetables. Mr. Everett, with 
the assistance of twenty authorities in the field, has 
presented comprehensive information for each of these 
subjects. Also included is a detailed Garden Calendar, 
by region and date and a section on pests and diseases. 

Each volume is easy to handle, and the over 3,000 
colored as well as black and white illustrations and 
very legible type add much appeal. Entries are alpha- 
betically listed by both common and botanical names. 

For the do-it-yourself gardener (and who isn't 
to some degree at least), this work gives the most 
up-to-date comprehensive information available in one 
work. 



GIFTS MADE TO THE LIBRARY 

An important addition was made to the Society's 
library by Mrs. Van Horn Ely, of Paoli, when she 
presented Camellia — • Its Appreciation & Artistic Ar- 
rangement, by Choka Adachi, published byKoyo Shoin 
Co., Ltd., Tokyo. This is an extremely important addi- 
tion to camellia literature. For its colored plates alone 
it excels yet it also includes camellias in gardens, in 
arrangements, and in lore. 

An addition to the rare book collection is 
Travels in North and South Carolina, by William Bartram, 
published in Dublin, Ireland, in 1793. This was given 
by Mrs. E. Page Allinson, of West Chester. 

Other gifts to the library are : 

The Huntington Botanical Garden 1905-1949 

Personal Recollections of William Hertrich, given 
by C. B. Wentworth of Philadelphia. 

Romance of Nature, by Mrs. Charles Meredith, given by 
Mrs. Clarence Smith, of Furlong, Penna. 

Romance of Daffodils, by William Brumbach, given by 
the author. 

Food, the 1959 Year Book of U.S.D.A., given by Honor- 
able James A. Byrne, M. C, Philadelphia. 

Flowers of Nassau, by Helen Burns Higgs, given by 
the author. 

Decorations for Christmas, by Grace Baker Ray, Jr., 
given by the author. 

Your Garden in Town, by Ruth Marie Peters and 
Budget Landscaping, by Carlton B. Lees, given by Mr. 
Lees. 



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GARDEN CLINICS 

JANUARY 21 (Saturday) 

PLANTING DESIGN: THE USE OF EVERGREENS 

2:00 P.M. Swarthmore College Campus 

Taking advantage of the large collection of ever- 
greens of the Arthur Hoyt Scott Horticultural Foun- 
dation, Martha Ludes Garra will analyze and discuss 
the ways in which they are best used. Cultural and 
growth information will be included. 

FEBRUARY 18 (Saturday) 

THE SMALL HOME GREENHOUSE 

2:00 P.M. Morris Arboretum Greenhouse 

Ernest Drinker Ballard will provide essential in- 
formation for home greenhouse gardeners. What plants 
to grow in what temperatures, water, light, heat and 
the many other factors which control gardening under 
glass will be dealth with. 

Register by using the clip-out coupon below. Send 
it, along with $1.00 for each Clinic, to 389 Suburban 
Station, Philadelphia 3. Registrations will be accepted 
in the order received ; confirmation will be made by 
return post card. 

GARDEN CLINIC 

REGISTRATION 

Please register me for the Garden Clinic(s) 
checked below. (Registration fee $1.00 each) 

□ The Use of Evergreens Jan. 21, 1961 

a The Small Home Greenhouse Feb. 18, 1961 

Name 

Address 

Telephone 

Your registration will be confirmed by 
return mail. 



DATES to mark on your CALENDAR 

JANUARY 10-12 (Tuesday- Thursday) 

10:00 A. M.-6:00 P. M. 389 Suburban Station Bldg. 

HOLLY VARIETIES AND THEIR PROPAGATION 

Dr. John Swartlc)', of Ambler Jr. College of 
Temple University and proprietor of Holliday Nursery 
will exhibit holly propagation methods along with cut 
specimens of many named varieties. 



JANUARY 24 (Tuesday) 

MORE BIRDS FOR YOUR GARDEN 

an illustrated lecture by 

Charles E. Mohr 

2:00 P.M. Pennsylvania Rooms, Sheraton Hotel 

Mr. Mohr is Director of the Swiss Pines Park, a 
new nature and horticultural center near Valley Forge, 
Pa. For twelve years, Mr. Mohr directed the National 
Audubon Society's year-round educational center at 
Greenwich, Conn. A nationally known nature photog- 
rapher, his work has appeared in Life, National Geo- 
graphic and many other magazines. 

A part of Mr. Mohr's talk will be devoted to the 
eflfect of insecticides on birdlife, a topic of much inter- 
est to horticulturists, both amateur and professional. 

Members may bring guests. 

FEBRUARY 2 (Thursday) 

GARDEN WITH IMAGINATION 

Carlton B. Lees 
Director, Penna. Horticultural Society 
8:00 P.M. First Baptist Church, Wayne 

An illustrated lecture in which a practical ap- 
proach to landscaping is developed for budgets large 
and small. Open to the public. 

Sponsored by The Community Garden Club of 
Wayne and the Horticultural Society. 



THE PENNSYLVAN 



HORTICULTURE 



SOCIETY 



I6I7 PENNSYLVANIA BOULEVARD 
PHILADELPHIA 3. PENNSYLVANIA 




VOL II No. 2 



FEBRUARY. 1961 



OUTSTANDING ANNUALS PROVIDE SUMMER COLOR 



January garden magazines always contain a 
bulging packet of introductions for the new year — 
annuals, perennials, vegetables, roses and gladiolus 
described in glowing terms which intoxicate all true 
gardeners. Who can read of petunia Coral Satin, 
aster Pink Lady or marigolds A.laska and Hawaii with- 
out suffering the visions and fragrances of summer- 
time? While these tantalizing new varieties are great 
and welcome additions to the garden, there are many 
older annuals which should not be forgotten. Some 
are commonly known ; some are not, but each is worth 
growing for the distinction it is capable of bringing 
to the garden. 

Ageratum: Blue Mink (sometimes listed as Tetra- 
blue) is the most satisfactory for uniformity, vigor, 
color, abundance of bloom and durability. It is com- 
pact, ten to twelve inches tall. 

Alyssum: Carpet of Snow (white) and Royal 
Carpet (purple) are the two most compact varieties for 
use as garden edging. If sown in July, Royal Carpet 
provides a particularly rich contrast for garden chry- 
santhemums because of its color and resistance to 
early frosts. 

Begonias: wax or fiberous-rooted types can be 
grown from seed like annuals and, if started early, 
provide good foliage and flowers for shaded situations. 
While the newer varieties such as Cinderella, Karin 
and Red Perfection are extremely showy, several of 
the older ones, such as Andy (pink), Pandy (red) and 
Snow, are well worth growing. 

Calendula: Pacific Beauty strain (available in 
separate colors: Apricot, Cream, Lemon, Persimmon) 
is notable because of its resistance to heat. Clean of 
color, even these are best, however, if sown in late 
fall for spring bloom, or about July 1st for autumn 
flowers. 

Celosia: both the plume and the crested celosias 
have regained popularity. The crested or coxcomb 
type is most useful to arrangers, but due to their 
irregular growth habit, they are less valuable in the 
garden than the plume sorts which build up great 
color mass. Most outstanding of all celosias is Forest 
Fire, a scarlet plume type with red-plum colored stems 
and leaves. Its effect in the garden is of molten lava 



and, because of the absence of green, is a striking and 
useful plant. Golden Fleece is its yellow counterpart, 
having green foliage. 

Of the crested types the Gilbert Hybrids are most 
outstanding for their color range. Some of the Gilbert 
varieties are: New Penny (copper-salmon). Maple 
Gold, Rose Beauty, Green Gold (silver-green) and 
Gold Dust. Other outstanding crested celosias are 
Toreador and Empress. 

Cleome: Helen Campbell is an old but valuable 
addition to any garden. Its spidery white flowers 
create a froth of white which is especially showy at 
dusk. Tall growing (3% feet) cleome is the easiest 
of annuals to grow. 

Coleus: now available in varieties and strains 
which can be grown from seed and are true to type. 
Othello is a purple-black variety which is especially 
good with pale pink petunias and other red or pink 
flowers. Candidum is a creamy white variety with a 
fringe of green on each leaf. Many other named sorts 
are available. Coleus develops its best color in at 
least partly shaded situations if provided with enough 
moisture. 

Cosmos: Sensation strain is very clean in color. 
Available in separate colors : pink, white, a pleasing 
crimson, and the bicolored rose and crimson Radiance. 

Dahlias: Unwin's Dwarf Hybrids are still ex- 
tremely good for color, flower form and ease of culture. 
The W-F Dwarf Hybrids are slightly more compact 
and produce some excellent individual flowers. Like 
all seedling dahlias, however, much variation occurs in 
flower form. Fall Festival and Zulu are bronze leaved 
strains producing mostly crimson and scarlet flowers. 
While individual flowers are not as good as those of 
the Unwin or W-F Hybrids, the garden effect of the 
very dark foliage combined with the flowers is unusual. 

Helianthus (Sunflower) : Suttons Red, Red and 
Gold Hybrids and Excelsior Hybrids are pinwheels of 
pure joy. The flowers range from chestnut-brown with 
black centers to pure gold. In between are all sorts 
of radiating and zoned patterns combining the two. 
The plants are much branched, five to seven feet tall 
and produce abundant flowers of luncheon plate size. 

(continued next page) 



OUTSTANDING ANNUALS PROVIDE— (cont'd) 

The seeds are mostly black and attract numbers of 
finches to the garden. 

Impateins: much improved in recent years and 
useful for shaded situations. Beauty of Klettgau is 
brilliant scarlet, dwarf and vigorous. Also available 
are Park Snowflake, Blaze, Pinkie and other good 
varieties. 

Marigolds: reliable, sturdy annuals which have 
been dramatically improved over the years. Of the 
large flowered sorts, the Climax strain — Yellow, 
Golden and the orange Toreador — are most outstand- 
ing for size and color and for even a faintly sweet 
fragrance. Glitters is clear yellow with incurved, 
chrysanthemum-like petals. Man-in-the-Moon, one of 
the products of the quest for a white marigold, is per- 
haps the loveliest of the rich, cream yellows, and is 
exceedingly useful color in both garden and house. 
For rich velvet Victorian color, grow the older but 
still excellent Red and Gold Hybrids. 

The dwarf marigolds, particularly the yellows, 
are superb as edging plants not only for their ease of 
growth but for uniformity and mass of bloom. Lemon 
Drop and Butterball are two outstanding varieties 
with lemon-yellow flowers and grow only eight or 
nine inches tall. The Petite strain — Petite-yellow,- 
gold, -orange and-harmony — are newer dwarf varieties 
of excellent quality. 

Cupid, a primrose yellow marigold, produces 2V2 
inch flowers on eight inch plants. Each plant is like 
a bouquet, so regularly does it grow. 

Nicotiana: Daylight is a white hybrid which 
remains open throughout the day. The species, 
A', affinis, is still superior for fragrance, however, and 
has a special appeal in the evening garden. 

Petunias: F-1 Grandiflora and F-1 Multiflora, 
recent developments, have almost completely replaced 
older types. The Grandifloras are large flowered, frilled 
and/or fringed. The Multifloras produce smaller 
flowers (still superior to oldtime petunias) in great 
abundance and clear colors. 

The outstanding F-1 Grandifloras are Ballerina 
(intense carmine), Fire Dance (rich scarlet with gold 
throat), La Paloma (white with gold throat). May- 
time (bright, clear rose-pink). Blue Magic (deep 
purple). Blue Lace (blue with dark veining), Seafoam 
(pure white). 

The outstanding F-1 Multifloras are Linda (fresh 
rose salmon), Comanche (red). Pink Satin, Red Satin, 
Paleface (white). Sugar Plum (rose with red veins). 
Yellow Gleam (cream-yellow), and Pink Sensation 
(rose-pink). 

Portulaca: now available in separate colors, the 
pure white, alba, with its golden stamens, glistens in 
hot sunlight and is more useful in the garden than 
the wildly mixed colors of yesteryear. 

Pudbeckia: Gloriosa Daisy is an excellent Black- 
eyed-Susan relative of robust size and color. It must 
be started early for bloom but will live through the 
winter to bloom profusely the second year. 

Salvia: Blue Bedder is perhaps one of the best 
blues of all garden plants. Royal Blue is being offered 
this year as an improved variety, but it is difficult 



to see how anything could improve on this plant. 

Of the red salvias, the compact (ten inch) St. 
John's Fire is one of the best. 

Sanvitalia (Creeping Zinnia) : is a seldom seen 
creeping plant, six inches tall, which produces great 
numbers of small, double, yellow flowers. Old, but 
reliable and very useful. 

Snapdragons: like calendulas, snapdragons are 
essentially cool climate plants. Hybridizers are con- 
stantly improving them to produce more heat resist- 
ance as well as improved flower form. One of the best 
is the strain called Ginger or Panorama Snaps. The 
Sentinel and Rocket strains are also known for good 
flower retention and the heat resistance necessary for 
garden use in the greater Delaware Valley area. 

Thunbergia (Black-Eyed Susan vine): a little 
climber or trailing ground cover with delightful 
orange, buff and white flowers. It grows well in par- 
tial shade, too, and while not spectacular, it is a 
reliable plant which deserves to be used more than it is. 

Zinnias: Mammoth Dahlia Flowered, California 
Giants and Giant Cactus Flowered are all vast im- 
provements over the zinnia of old. Not only has 
flower size and form changed, but colors are clean, 
bright and fresh. 

The Dahlia Flowered type is the most formal 
flower form ; the petals are flat and the over-all flower 
is not shaggy in appearance. Crimson Monarch, Ex- 
quisite (rose pink). Polar Bear (best white), Canary 
Bird (yellow) and Will Rogers (scarlet) are the out- 
standing varieties in this group. 

Giants of California are a more recent develop- 
ment. The flowers are less regular in form than the 
Dahlia Flowered, but petals are not quilled or twisted. 
Outstanding varieties in the California Giants group 
are: Cherry Queen (cherry rose). Enchantress (light 
rose). Miss Wilmott (soft pink). Purity (white) and 
Golden Queen. 

The best of the Cactus Flowered or Burpee Giant 
Hybrids, which are quite shaggy in texture and have 
quilled and/or twisted petals, are: Apricot, Blaze 
(burning orange), Eskimo, Ice Cream (cream yellow), 
Riverside Beauty (pink). Sunny Boy (yellow) and 
Rosie O'Grady (pink). 

Outstanding mixed color strains are : Tetra Shades 
of Rose, Luther Burbank, Miss Universe, Merry-go- 
round. 

For neat, medium sized flowers, it is still difficult 
to surpass the Cut-and-Come-Again strain of zinnias. 

SOURCES 

Many of the varieties recommended are available 
from local garden supply specialists; all are available 
from one or more of the following seedhouses : 

W. Atlee Burpee Co., Philadelphia 32, Pa., Clin- 
ton, Iowa or Riverside, Calif. (Write to address near- 
est to you.) 

Joseph Harris Co., Inc., 60 Moreton Farm, 
Rochester 11, N. Y. 

George W. Park Seed Co., Greenwood 21, South 
Carolina. 

Vaughn's, 10 W. Randolph St., Chicago 1, 111., 
or 24 Vesey St., New York 7, N. Y. 



PHILADELPHIA FLOWER SHOW 

March 5-11, 1961 

(Thi« year's Flower Show opens at 1 :00 
P. M. on Sunday). 

The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society 
section: 

. . . ARRANGEMENT CLASS entries must 
be received by Monday, February 6. 
. . . HORTICULTURAL CLASS entries 
must be received by Wednesday, February 15. 

Members entering- the amateur horticul- 
tural classes calling for plants (pansies, 
violas, cuttings) to be shown in cedar flats 
(13"x9"x3") may obtain them directly from 
the Society. The price is 50c plus 2c tax. They 
may be picked up in the rooms of the Society. 



Correction — While the December issue of 
the NEWS contained a careful explanation of the 
species standing of the Formosa lily {Lilium formasa- 
num), the editor lost face when he discovered the 
redundant i which, somehow, appeared in the specific 
name. The above spelling we guarantee. 

While on the subject of editorial problems, this 
may be a good moment to point out why specific 
(species) names of plants (in the NEWS) do not begin 
with uppercase letters in such cases as Malus sieboldii 
where the specific name is derived from that of a 
person, and Pinus strohus where the specific name is 
derived from a generic name. We quote Recommenda- 
tion 73F of Article 73 of the International Code of 
Botanical Nomenclature which was made at The In- 
ternational Botanical Congress, Utrecht, Netherlands. 
1956: 

"All specific and infraspecific (ex. : variety 
names) epithets should be ^\ritten with a 
small initial letter, although authors desiring 
to use capital letters may do so when the 
epithets are directly derived from the names 
of persons (whether actual or mythical), or 
are vernacular (or non-Latin) names, or are 
former generic names." 

The majority of botanists and other professional 
people working with plant names no longer use upper- 
case letters in these instances, except for non-Latin 
vernacular names. 



ART FORMS IN FOREST, FIELD AND GARDEN 

a special exhibit of 

Paintings, graphics, and drawings by 

Erick Hans Krause 

January 15 - April 16, 1961 

The Academy of Natural Sciences, Philadelphia 



DATE SET FOR DAFFODIL SYMPOSIUM 

A Daffodil Day will take place at Swarthmore 
College, Swarthmore, Pa., on Tuesday, April 11, 1961. 
Included in the program will be illustrated talks on 
culture, varieties, classification, daffodil showmanship 
and the use of daffodils in the landscape. Tours of 
Swarthmore and Tyler Arboretum plantings will take 
place in the afternoon. 

The event is sponsored jointly by the Arthur Hoyt 
Scott Horticultural Foundation, the Northeast Region 
of the American Daffodil Society and The Pennsyl- 
vania Horticultural Society. Gertrude Smith Wister 
(Mrs. John C. Wister) is Chairman. 

More detailed information will be published in 
next month's NEWS. 



1961 GARDEN VISITS 

Wayne, Devon and 
Newtown Square 

Bryn Athyn, Rydal, 
Huntingdon Valley 

Sunday, September 17 Penllyn 



Saturday, April 22 
Sunday, May 14 



Additional information will be published in next 
month's NEWS. 



WALKING TOURS SCHEDULED 

Four walking tours — three of them on Sunday 
afternoons — have been scheduled for members of the 
Horticultural Society and their friends. 

Sunday, April 23, 2:00 P.M., Arthur Hoyt Scott 
Horticultural Foundation, Swarthmore College. Dr. 
John C. Wister will conduct this tour to see the famous 
collection of flowering cherries, magnolias, crabapples. 

Thursday, April 27, 10:30 A.M., Swiss Pines 
Park, a new horticultural foundation near Phoenix- 
ville. Mr. Charles Mohr, Director of the Foundation, 
will provide information on the plantings, purpose and 
future plans of the Park. 

Sunday, April 30, 2:00 P.M., Tyler Arboretum, 
Lima, Pa. Gertrude Smith Wister (Mrs. John C. 
Wister) will conduct the tour to see extensive collec- 
tions of late daffodils and wildflowers. 

Sunday, June 4, 2:00 P.M., Morris Arboretum, 
Chestnut Hill. Ernesta Drinker Ballard (Mrs. Fred- 
eric L. Ballard, Jr.) will act as guide on this walk 
and will place special emphasis on the particularly 
outstanding specimens of mature evergreen and 
deciduous trees in this fine, old arboretum. 

No registration or reservations are necessary. 
Please bring a friend who may be interested in joining 
the Horticultural Society. Additional details will 
appear in future issues of the NEWS. 



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DATES to mark 

(please see page 3 for 

GARDEN CLINICS 

FEBRUARY 18 (Saturday) 

THE SMALL HOME GREENHOUSE 

2:00 P.M. Morris Arboretum Greenhouse 

Ernesta Drinker Ballard will provide essential in- 
formation for home greenhouse gardeners. What plants 
to grow in what temperatures, water, light, heat and 
the many other factors which control gardening under 
glass will be discussed. 
MARCH 18 (Saturday) 

LAWN CARE 
2:00 P.M. Gen. Arnold Field, Wynnewood 

It's never too early to get the facts on giving your 
lawn the best possible care in the most practical man- 
ner. Ernesta Drinker Ballard will conduct this outdoor 
session on the site of the test plots of The Delaware 
Valley Turf Grass Association. 



on your CALENDAR 

additional important dates) 
MARCH 25 (Saturday) 

2:00 P.M. 



Register by using the clip-out coupon below. Send 
it to 389 Suburban Station, Philadelphia 3. Registra- 
tions will be accepted in the order received ; confirma- 
tion will be made by return post card. 



GARDEN CLINIC 
REGISTRATION 

Please register me for the Garden Clinic(s) 
checked below. (Registration $1.00 per Clinic 
per member) 
n THE SMALL HOME GREENHOUSE 

Saturday, February 18 
n LAWN CARE Q PRUNING 

Saturday, March 18 Saturday, March 25 

Name 

Address 

Telephone 

All registrations are confirmed by return mail. 



PRUNING 



Morris Arboretum 



The hows, whys and wherefores of pruning dec- 
iduous plants will be dealt with through on-the-spot 
demonstration and actual pruning practice. Conducted 
by Martha Ludes Garra. (Use Garden Clinic registra- 
tion coupon, column left.) 



FEBRUARY 21 - 23 (Tuesday - Thursday) 
CRAFTS WITH SEEDS AND PODS 

10 :00 A.M. - 6 :00 P.M. 389 Suburban Station Bldg. 

Tn the hands of a craftsman, seeds and pods of 
garden plants often take on new importance. Two 
and three dimensional examples of the use of these 
materials will be exhibited by several members of the 
Horticultural Society. 

MARCH 8 (Wednesday) 

GARDENS 'ROUND THE WORLD 

Inez Turner Burkett 



SPRING LUNCHEON 



12:30 P.M. 



Warwick Hotel, Philadelphia 



Mrs. Burkett, of Cleveland, lecturer, flower ar- 
ranger and judge, travelled the gardens of the world 
with her camera. With her quick eye for composition, 
Mrs. Burkett's photos of botanic gardens from Ceylon 
and Java to Kew and Brooklyn are brilliant pleasures 
to behold. 

The annual awards of the Horticultural Society 
will be announced and presented at this luncheon. 
Invitations will be mailed to all members in early 
February. 



THE PENNSVLVAN 
HORTICULTURE 



SOCIE- 



1617 PENNSYLVANIA BOULEVARD 
PHILADELPHIA 3, PENNSYLVANIA 



HORr/fJ 




VOL II No. 3 



MARCH, 1961 



MARt*' 



SMALL GARDEN JEWELS SPARKLE IN SPRING 



It is both surprising and encouraging to kiu)w that 
here in Pennsylvania we can grow a wide variety of 
small, early spring beauties from the Alps, from the 
Himalayas, from our own western mountains and from 
our local woods. A few have been hybridized by 
horticulturists but most are literally wild flowers. 

SMALL BULBS 

The small bulbs of the world come up in early 
spring and add much to our gardens if we have had 
the foresight to plant them the previous fall. Snow- 
drops, crocus, scillas, chionodoxas and grape hyacinths 
are indispensable for their earliness ', some provide 
sheets of blue. One small bulb that we see less fre- 
quently is the winter aconite {Eranthis hyemalis) with 
its low golden buttercups lighting a patch of woods 
or gleaming under a shrub in the garden. It is among 
the very earliest. Another early sparkler is Anemone 
blanda. This has special charm. Its daisy-like flowers 

on two to six inch stems come 
in pure pink, blue, purple, 
lavender or white. They mul- 
tiply rapidly in half-shady 
positions. 

WOODLAND PLANTS 

Of the native woodland 
flowers, hepatica is probably 
the most universally beloved. 
WINTER ACONITE It is closely related to 
anemones and has some of the same lovely coloring. 
Bloodroot, wood anemone, wild columbine, trillium, 
violets and many others bring early sparkle to any 
shady nook or bit of woods. Too rarely seen in these 
positions is the wonderful Shortia galacifolia. While 
native to the moun- 
tains of North Caro- 
lina, it is perfectly 
hardy here and only 
needs a peaty, sandy 
soil to show its red- 
burnished, evergreen 
leaves and to bring 
forth its exquisite bell- 
like, white flowers in 
spring. SHORTIA GALACIFOLIA 






For these same posi- 
tions and blooming 
period try the early 
primulas. Some of 
them are wild forms : 
Primula farinosa, P. 
frondosa and P. fauriei, 
all jewels two to four 
inches high, with clus- 
tered heads of little 
five-petaled primrose 
flowers in shades of 
pink, lavender and 
pure white. At about PRIMULA VERIS 

the same time P. denticulata sends up its balls of bloom, 
starting near the ground but gradually lengthening. 
The colors vary from white to lavender through the 
intermediate shades of red. They need much more 
space than the little P. farinosa group, as each plant 
will quickly grow to a foot wide. While Primula 
denticulata is hardy, it should not be exposed to wetness 
around the roots in winter. After these come the vernal 
primroses : P. vulgaris, P. polyantha and P. juliae hybrids. 
The wild English primrose now comes in many forms 
and colors, the hybrid polyanthus with their taller 
bunches of flowers have even a wider range of color, 
and the Juliae hybrids have almost worn out the term 
"jewel-like" with their amethyst, topaz and ruby tones. 
Besides these are all the old-fashioned forms and 
species : cowslips, oxlips, hose-in-hose, gold and silver- 
laced, Jack-in-the-green, some of which have to be 
seen to be believed. This whole group is hardy any- 
where in Pennsylvania and are of rapid increase and 
easy division. They all do well in woodland soil in 
part shade but will grow and bloom in all sorts of 
improbable situations. 

MOUNTAIN FLOWERS 

Some of the mountain flowers are so well known 
and commonly grown that you can pick up plants of 
them at any roadside stand, others are so rare and 
choice that you have to grow them from seed or seek 
out the comparatively few nurseries that offer them. 

(continued next page] 




SMALL GARDEN JEWELS SPARKLE— (cont'd) 

Of the common but still very valuable group we 
think first of arabis with its sheets of white flowers, 
alyssum, the "Basket-of-Gold" (or its pleasanter pale 
yellow variety), candytuft (Iberis sempervirens) for its 
low evergreen foliage and long bloom of brilliant white 
flowers, and creeping phlox {P. subulate)^ This last has 
been propagated i n 
many unpleasant 
colors, but the whites 
are lovely and of the 
pink varieties, Vivid, 
is a pure tone. There 
are other good pinks 
and lavenders. It is 
best to pick them out ANDROSACE SEMPERVIVOWES 
in bloom. They are perfect for groundcovers, many 
holding good foliage over the winter. 

The less common members of this group include 
the Androsaces which are choice plants from the Him- 
alayas. There are two that will adapt easily to our 
conditions. Like all alpine plants they need a porous 
soil and ample water in their growing season. In 
addition they prefer a modicum of shade. They spread 
much as does the strawberry, sending out radiating 
stems from a central rosette. With the encouragement 
of a stone, a hairpin or a bit of soil, these will soon 
root and will form a colony of plants with heads of 
delightful pink flowers on two to four inch stems. 
While Androsace sarmentosa has green rosettes and does 
not increase quite so rapidly, they bloom two weeks 
apart so both of them are needed for a long patch 
of color. 

The stone-cresses, Aethionema, come from the 
Mediterranean region, so some protection in winter 
is advisable. In addition, they should be planted in a 
warm sunny position, preferably against a stone. They 
are really small shrubs and if the tips of the branches 
should kill back, a shearing in spring will usually 
force their pretty blue needle-like leaves and then their 
short spires of pink flowers. Many add fragrance to 
their other charms. 

The tall columbines (Aqulegia) are seen in nearly 
every garden ; it would be difficult to do without their 
airy grace. Less frequently seen are many charming 
dwarf species and varieties that will thrive if given 
the alpine conditions mentioned above. Outstanding 
are Aquilegia scopulorum, a choice native in blues and 
pinks ; A. akitensis, a blue and. white species from Japan, 
and the lovely A. flabellata with its decorative bluish 
leaves and waxy white or blue flowers. There are also 
some very attractive dwarf hybrids. 

Dianthus or pinks really can't be spared from our 
gardens. Besides the sweet Scotch pinks there are a 
great many small species and hybrids. To name a few, 
glossy-leaved Dianthus alpinus with large freckled pink 
flowers (and does well in a bit of shade) ; D. neglectus, 
with short grass and warm pink flowers of special 
charm ; D. arenarius, which molds itself to rock or ledge 



and then is ablow with fringy flowers in white or pink, 
and the small .gray mats of such hybrids as "La Bour- 
brille" and "Spencer Bickham." 

There are hundreds of these little flowers to thrill 
us in spring. Space forbids more than mention of one 
other group, the little irises. In addition to the well 
known pumila hybrids of fleur-de-lis, there are the 
butterflies of /. flavissima in soft yellow ; /. verna, blue 
and gold and needing peaty sandy soil in part shade ; 
/. gracUipes, one of the daintiest, a Japanese woodlander 
in lavender or white ; /. cristata, our own native creeper 
in blue or white, and many others. 

Illustrations by Doretta KJaber, from Rock Garden Plants — 
new ways to use them around your home. 

Holt Rinehart & Winston — 1959 

NEW MEMBERS RECEIVING SPECIAL GIFTS 

Special packets of Burpee's new Double Gloriosa 
daisies are being sent to all new members of the 
Society (since January 1) by the W. Atlee Burpee 
Company of Philadelphia. These gifts will provide 
brilliant masses of flowers in their gardens which will 
have special significance not only for the newness of 
the variety but for the newness of the membership, 
too. 

All who join at the Society's booth at the 1961 
Philadelphia Flower Show, will receive their choice 
of a potted holly cutting or an indoor plant to mark 
the beginning of their membership which we hope 
will grow, like the plants, to give them many years of 
pleasure and satisfaction. 

Be sure to tell your friends about the Pennsyl- 
vania Horticultural Society, about the NEWS, about 
HORTICULTURE, about our wonderful library, the 
Garden Clinics and the many gardening helps which 
become available to them by joining. New home own- 
ers, just starting out with the problems of lawn care, 
pruning, and plant selection would find membership 
a great help, and experienced gardeners will find the 
special information sources of the library invaluable. 
Better still, — bring them to the Society's membership 
booth at the Philadelphia Flower Show so they can 
join and take home their membership plant and receive 
their seed packets in time for spriilg sowing. 

MEMBERS RECEIVE PHILADELPHIA GUIDE 

The Philadelphia Guide published by radio station 
WFLN has dedicated the March 1961 issue to the 
Philadelphia Flower Show with a cover photograph 
of an award winning arrangement by Mrs. T. Bromley 
Flood, a member of The Pennsylvania Horticultural 
Society, and a behind-the-scene story on the Society's 
section of the Flower Show. The Philadelphia Guide 
circulates to over 10,000 subscribers throughout 
Greater Delaware Valley. 

Members of the Society are receiving compli- 
mentary copies of this special issue of the Guide. This 
has been made possible through the generosity of 
the publisher. 



GARDEN CLINICS PROGRAM 
TO BE STEPPED-UP 

Because of the overwhelming demand from mem- 
bers, the Garden Clinics Committee under the direction 
of Mrs. Paul Rebmann, has decided to provide many 
more clinics for members of the Society. More than 
twice the number of registrations which could be 
accepted have been received for most of the sessions, 
so many members have been disappointed. Those who 
have attended, however, have expressed enthusiastic 
praise for the sound horticultural information which 
they have received, and while it has been suggested 
that the size of each clinic be increased, it is the small 
size of the sessions which helps make them so success- 
ful. No member is too far away from demonstration 
material to be able to see; no one need hesitate to 
ask questions. 

In order to maintain the small size of each while 
increasing the number offered and yet keep within the 
budget alloted to this activity, it is necessary to raise 
the registration fee to two dollars per person for each 
clinic. This will begin with Martha Ludes Garra's 
April 6 session. Growing Vegetables at Home, in 
which those participating will be required to bring, 
of all things, their lunch ! 

Dates, topics and places : 

Saturday, March 18: 

Lawn Care, Ardmore (will be repeated, if neces- 
sary) 

Saturday, March 25 : 

Pruning (includes roses), Morris Arboretum 

Thursday, April 6: 

Growing Vegetables at Home, Ambler 

Saturday, April 8: 

Plantingi Design: Using Deciduous Trees, Morris 
Arboretum 

Tuesday, April 11 : 
Saturday, April 15: 

Spraying to Control Insects and Diseases, Glad- 
wynne 

Saturday, April 22: 
^ Planting Design: Use of Evergreens (repeated), 
Swarthmore 

Saturday, May 6: 

Planting Design: Use of Shrubs, Morris Arbore- 
tum 

Wednesday, May 10: 

Planting for Late Season Color, Ambler 

Wednesday, May 24: 

Planting Annuals: Chestnut Hill 

Wednesday, May 31 : 
^ Year-'round Use of Your Coldframe, Gladwynne 

I 



LIBRARIAN JOINS STAFF 

Because of the resignation of Mrs. Zuch as librar- 
ian of The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society on 
January 1, it became necessary to find a person to 
provide this vital service to our members. Mrs. Zuch 
and her husband took a house in Florida for this 
(well chosen) winter and I know that the many mem- 
bers who have relied on her helpfulness over the past 
four years will wish her well. 

I am pleased to announce the appointment of 
Miss Ann H. Waterman to our staff on February 20. 
Miss Waterman comes to the Society from the Gray 
Herbarium-Arnold Arboretum Library of Harvard 
University. She earned her degress (B.S., M.S.) in 
botany at Michigan State University and studied for 
one year at St. Andrews University in Scotland. For 
three summers Miss Waterman worked at the U. S. 
National Herbarium (Smithsonian Institute), Wash- 
ington, D. C. and she spent one summer at the Bio- 
logical Station of Montana State University. 

At Cambridge, Miss Waterman was attending 
Simmons College to earn credits toward a degree in 
Library Science; she expects to continue work here, 
at Drexel Institute. 

Because of her botanical background and her 
knowledge of the Society's valuable Lloyd Collection, 
we expect that our new librarian will help to carry 
forward the program of the Society into new fields. 
The Library Committee feels that it is essential that 
Miss Waterman become familiar with the collections 
of the many other important libraries in the Philadel- 
phia area to determine how we can be of greater 
service to students and to other individuals doing plant 
research as well as to our members. Because of her 
training in plant taxonomy, Miss Waterman will also 
be able to handle the many plant identification prob- 
lems which come to the Society, particularly those 
having to do with native plants. 

Library hours are Monday through Friday from 
9:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. 

H. D. Mirick, 
President 



PHILADELPHIA FLOWER SHOW 

March 5-11, 1961 

This year's flower show 
opens at 1 :00 P. M. on Sunday. 



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DATES to mark on your CALENDAR 



GARDEN CLINICS 

MARCH 18 (Saturday) 2:00 P.M. Wynnewood 

LAWN CARE Ernesta Drinker Ballard 

MARCH 25 (Saturday) 2:00 P.M. Morris Arboretum 
PRUNING (including roses) Martha Ludes Garra 

APRIL 6 (Thurs.) 11:00-3:00 (bring lunch) Ambler 
GROWING VEGETABLES AT HOME Mrs. Garra 

APRIL 8 (Saturday) 2:00 P.M. Morris Arboretum 
PLANTING DESIGN: DECIDUOUS TREES Mrs. Garra 

APRIL 11 (Tuesday) 2:00 P.M. and Gladwynne 

APRIL 15 (Sat.) 2:00 P.M. repeated Mrs. Ballard 

SPRAYING TO CONTROL INSECTS AND DISEASES 

Register by using the clip-out coupon below. Send it to 389 
Suburban Station, Philadelphia .?. Registrations will be accepted in 
the order received; confirmation wilt be made by return post card. 



GARDEN CLINIC 
REGISTRATION 

Please register me for the Garden Clinic (s) 
checked below. 

D March 18 LAWN CARE ($1.00) 

D March 25 PRUNING ($1.00) 

D April 6 VEGETABLES ($2.00) 

G April 8 DECIDUOUS TREES ($2.00) 
D April 11 SPRAYING ($2.00) 

D April 15 SPRAYING (repeated) ($2.00) 

Name ...._ „ „ „ 

Address — _ „ 

Telephone 

All registrations are confirmed by return mail. 



APRIL 11 (Tuesday) 
Swarthmore College 



Swarthmore 



DAFFODIL DAY 



Advance registration will be necessary for this 
all-day symposium which is being sponsored coopera- 
tively by the Arthur Hoyt Scott Horticultural Foun- 
dation, the Northeast Region, American Daffodil 
Society and The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society. 
Write or telephone for program and registration form 
(389 Suburban Station Bldg.) after March 1. 

APRIL 19-20 (Wednesday-Thursday) 

DAFFODIL SHOW 

Philadelphia National Bank Broad & Chestnut Sts. 
1:00-7:30 P.M. Wednesday 

9:30- A. M. - 5:00 P. M. Thursday 

Schedules will be mailed to all who exhibited in 
past daffodil shows. Anyone wishing a schedule may 
obtain one by writing or telephoning the Horticultural 
Society (LO 3-8352). 

APRIL 22 (Saturday) 

GARDEN VISITS 

1 :00-5:00 P. M. Wayne, Devon, Newton Square 

Hosts on the first Garden Visits day of 1961 will 
be Mr. and Mrs. John B. H. Carter, "Corotoman," 
Newtown Square ; Mr. and Mrs. Fitz Eugene D. New- 
bold, "Fox Creek Farm" and Mr. and Mrs. Alan 
Crawford, "Little Brook Farm" of Devon; Mr. and 
Mrs. William A. Randall, "Wildacre Cottage," Wayne. 



SOCIE' 



16 1 7 PENNSYLVANIA BOULEVARD 
PHILADELPHIA 3, PENNSYLVANIA 




VOL II No. 4 



OUTSTANDING VARIETIES MAKE OUTSTANDING GARDENS 



The individual gardener has little time to study 
seriously a wide range of the various kinds of trees, 
shrubs, vines and herbaceous plants which are included 
in the complete garden, yet the discriminating gar- 
dener must give considerable thought to selecting 
these plants. With the help of professional horticul- 
turists, plant specialists and other experienced indi- 
viduals and organizations, the Pennsylvania Horti- 
cultural Society provides sound recommendations to 
its members such as the holly varieties listed in the 
December 1960 issue of the NEWS. In this issue we 
include information to help you select daffodils, crab 
apples and azaleas. 



AZALEAS 

This list of azaleas was compiled by the Azalea 
Garden Committee of the Pennsylvania Horticultural 
Society for its exhibit in this year's Philadelphia 
Flower Show. Called, "A Dozen Foolproof Azaleas 
for the Greater Delaware Valley," the exhibit was 
especially designed to acquaint new homeowners and 
beginning gardeners (as well as more advanced gar- 
deners who have not yet grown azaleas) with the 
most reliable varieties for the area. They were chosen 
for their hardiness, quantity and quality of bloom, 
foliage, freedom from insect pests and diseases and 
for their adaptability to a wide variation of growing 
conditions. All are available from most local nurseries 
and garden centers. (In reality, we include a baker's 
dozen!) : 

AZALEA : DAMASK ROSE (Rhododendron mucrona- 
tum hybrid) 

SNOW AZALEA {R. mucronatum) (syn. R. indica alba, 
R. ledifolia alba) 

AZALEA: OTHELLO (R. kaempferi hybrid) 

.\ZALEA: NARCISSIFLORA (Ghent hybrid) 

KOREAN AZALEA (/?. poukhanense) 

AZALEA: COCCINEA SPECIOSA (Ghent hybrid) 

AZALEA: DAVIESI (Ghent hybrid) 

ROYAL AZALEA (R. schlippenbachii) 

PINKSHELL AZALEA {R. vaseyi) 



MOLLIS AZALEA (Mollis hybrid) 



AZALEA 
AZALEA 
AZALEA 



HINODE-GIRI (Kurume hybrid) 
ROSE GREELEY (Gable hybrid) 
MAXWELL (Ryuku group) 



FLOWERING CRAB APPLES 

When Charles E. Mohr, Director of Swiss Pines 
Park, was in the Society's library last year working 
with crab apple variety recommendations, the idea 
germinated that horticulturists who have had a great 
deal of experience with crab apples be polled about 
them. Mr. Mohr asked fourteen topflight horticultur- 
ists and nurserymen to name the ten best varieties, 
taking into consideration their value as garden plants 
and as food-providing trees for birds. The varieties 
and the number of times each was elected to the top 
ten positions are : 

Sargent Crab Apple (Malus sargentii), 14 

Malus 'Dorothea,' of hybrid origin, 13 

Japanese Flowering Crab Apple {M. floribunda), 13 

M. arnoldiana, of hybrid origin, 12 

M. zumi 'calocarpa,' of hybrid origin, 11 

Tea Crab Apple (M. hupehensis), 11 

Hopa Crab Apple, of hybrid origin, 10 

Toringo Crab Apple (M. sieboldii), 9 

M. 'Katherine,' of hybrid origin, 8 

Mandshurian Crab Apple (M. baccata mandshurica) , 8 

In addition to the top ten, the following received 
many votes: 

Carmine Crab Apple {M. atrosanguinea) , of hybrid 

origin 
Siberian Crab Apple {M. baccata) 
M. "Bob White,' of hybrid origin 
M. 'Oekonomierat Echtermeyer,' of hybrid origin 
M. "Red Jade,' of hybrid origin 
Tree Toringo Crab Apple (A/, sieboldi arborescens) 
Cutleaf Crab Apple (M. toringoides) 



DAFFODILS 

As a part of the Daffodil Day program which 
takes place at Svvarthmore College on April 11, a 
group of local dafTodil enthusiasts who are members 
of The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society and the 
American Daffodil Society, compiled a list of 100 
varieties for the greater Delaware Valley. Here they 
are listed according to type. 

It is interesting that in daffodils, as in many 
other kinds of plants, certain varieties remain near 
the top of the list, quality-wise, no matter how old 
or inexpensive they become. 



KEY: • — 50c or under per bulb; others up to $1.00 per bulb 
s — especially good for shows 
g — especially good for garden flowers 



Yellow Trumpets (la) 

Garron* s g 
Grapefruit s 
Hunter's Moon s 
Lord Nelson* g 
Mulatto* g 
Unsurpassable* g 

Bicolor Trumpets (lb) 

Content s g 
Effective s 
Foresight* s g 
Mirth* g 
Trousseau s g 
Zest* g 

White Trumpets (Ic) 



Beersheba* g 
Broughshane s 
Cantatrice s g 
Mount Hood* s 
Mrs. Ernest H. 
Silverdale s g 



g 
Krelage* 



Large Cups, Self Yellow (2a) 

Carlton* s g 
Crocus* s g 
Galway s g 
Shanghai s 
St. Egwin* s g 

Large Cups, Bright; 
Yellow Perianth (2a) 

Aranjuez* g 
Carbineer* g 
Ceylon s 
Dunkeld* s g 
Fortune* s g 
Rustom Pasha* s g 

Large Cups, Pale; 
White Perianth (2b) 

Bodilly* g 
Brunswick* g 
Coverack Perfection s g 
Greeting s g 
Polindra* s g 

Large Cups. Bright; 

White Perianth (2b) 

Deanna Durbin* g 
Fermoy* s g 
Kilworth* s g 
Selma Lagerlof* g 



Large Cupe, Pink; 
White Perianth (2b) 

Ladybird* g 

Mrs. R. O. Backhouse* g 

Pink Gem* g 

Pink Glory* g 

Pink Rim* s g 



Large Cups, White (2c) 

Carnlough* g 
Glenshane* g 
Hera* g 
Truth s 
White Nile* g 



Reverse Bicolor (2d) 

Binkie s g 

Small Cups, 

Yellow Perianth (3a) 

Chungking s 
Dinkie* g 

Edward Buxton* s g 
Mangosteen* g 
Market Merry* g 



Small Cups, Pale; 
White Perianth (3b) 

Angeline* s g 
Dreamlight* s g 
Kansas* s g 
Lough Areema g 
Sylvia O'Neill s g 

Small Cups, Bright; 
White Perianth (3b) 

Blarney s g 
Lady Kesteven* g 
Limerick* s 
Matapan s 
Pomona* g 
St. Louis* g 



Small Cups, White (3c) 

Bryher s g 
Chinese White s 
Cushendall s g 
Frigid* g 
Silver Salver* g 



DAFFODIL DAY PROGRAM 

Reservations are necessary for the April 11 
daffodil symposium which takes place at Swarthmore. 
The event is sponsored cooperatively by the Scott 
Horticultural Foundation of Swarthmore College, The 
Northeast Region, American Daffodil Society and 
The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society. 
PROGRAM 
10:00 A. M. Greetings 

Mrs. H. Rowland Timms, Regional Vice-President 

The American DaiTodil Society 
Carlton B. Lees, Director 

The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society 
Dr. John C. Wister, Director 

The Scott Horticultural Foundation of 
Swarthmore College 
10:15 A.M. Daffodil Culture, Dr. Wister 
11:00 A.M. The Smaller Daffodils 

Miss Estelle Sharp, Past Secretary 
The American Daffodil Society 
and a panel of enthusiasts. 
11:30 A.M. Preparing Daffodils for Show^ 

Mrs. Timms 
12:00 Daffodil Classification 

Gertrude Smith Wister, Assistant Director 
Scott Foundation 
12:30 P. M. Luncheon 
1 :30 P. M. Gardening With Daffodils, Mr. Lees 
2:15 P.M. Tour 

daffodil plantings in the Wister garden and the 

Scott Foundation Study Collection. 
Registration fee (including luncheon) is $4.00 
for members of The American Daffodil Society and/or 
The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society ; $5.00 to all 
others. Programs and registration blanks are available 
from the Horticultural Society, 389 Suburban Station 
Building, Philadelphia 3, Pa. 



Doubles (4) 

Camellia s 
Cheerfulness* g 
Golden Ducat s 
Mary Copeland* g 
Yellow Cheerfulness* g 

Garden Triandrus, 
Long Cups (5a) 

Shot Silk* s g 
Thalia* g 
Tresamble* s g 
Yellow Warbler s 

Garden Triandrus, 
Short Cups (5b) 

Hawera s g 
Silver Chimes s 

Garden Cyclamineus, 
Long Cups (6a) 

Charity May s g 
February Gold* g 
February Silver* s g 
March Sunshine* g 

Garden Cyclamineus, 
Short Cups (6b) 



Bervl* 



■s R 



Garden Jonquils, 
Long Cup (7a) 

Sweetness* s g 

Garden Jonquils, 
Short Cup (7b) 

Cherie* s g 
Golden Perfection* g 
Lanarth* s g 
Tittle-Tattle s g 
Trevithian* s g 

Garden Tazettas (8) 

Geranium* s 

Martha Washington* g 

Scarlet Gem* g 

Garden Poeticus (9) 

Actaea* s 
Cantabile* s 
Dactyl* s 

Wild Species and 
Varieties (10) 

asturiensis (minimus; 
bulbocodium vulg. 

conspicuus g 
jonquilla (single) g 
triandrus albus 

(.'Angel's T-ears) g 



APRIL GARDEN VISITS 

The 1961 Garden Visits program of the Pennsyl- 
vania Horticultural Society will be launched on 
Saturday, April 22 from 1:00 to 5:00 P.M. in the 
Newtown Square, Devon and Wayne area of suburban 
Philadelphia. Detailed route instructions for reaching 
each garden are included in the special Garden Visits 
folder inserted in this issue of the NEWS. We suggest 
that you keep the folder in the glove compartment 
of your car so it will be ready to guide you to the 
gardens which members of the Society will be privi- 
leged to visit on Sunday, May 14 and on Sunday. 
September 17, too. 

SATURDAY. April 22 

Mr. and Mrs. John B. H. Carter. "Corotoman" 
(Newtown Square) is a majestically proportioned 
country estate with many unusual old trees and a 
particularly lovely spring hillside garden. 

Mr. and Mrs. Fitz Eugene Newbold, "Fox Creek 
Farm" (Devon). A residential farm with a spacious 
terrace, Fox Creek Farm includes sweeping views of 
the pond below the house. 

Mr. and Mrs. Alan Crawford, "Little Brook Farm" 
(Devon). Here is an intimate spring garden adjoining 
an early farm house in a setting of woods, hillside 
and lake. 

Mr. and Mrs. William A. Randall, "Wildacre 
Cottage" (Wayne). This is an exceptional example 
of the bringing together of a small house and garden 
to create unique charm. Many unusual plants are 
included in this garden. 

The May 14 Garden Visits will take place in the 
Rydal. Huntingdon Valley. Bryn Athyn area. Details 
will be included in next month's issue of the NEWS. 



BUS RESERVATION 

GARDEN VISITS 
Saturday, April 22 

Application with payment ($1.50) must 
reach the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society. 
.^89 Suburban Station Building. Philadelphia 
3. at least one week before date of event. 



Name 



Address 



Clip this corner and mail 



WALKING TOURS 

Three walking tours of outstanding horticultural 
collections will take place in April for members of 
The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society. No advance 
registration or reservations are necessary. Each tour 
will take approximately two hours. 

Tours and meeting places are as follows : 

Sunday, April 23, 2:00 P.M., Arthur Hoyt Scott 
Horticultural Foundation of Swarthmore College. Dr. 
John C. Wister, Director of the Foundation, will lead 
this group. Please use the Chester Road (Route 320) 
parking area just south of the College Ave. intersection 
in Swarthmore (turn in at the Benjamin West House 
historical marker). The tour will start at the magnolia 
collection adjacent to the parking area. 

Thursday, April 27, 10:30 A. M., Swiss Pines Park. 
Dr. Charles E. Mohr, Director of this new horticultural 
foundation, will meet members in the designated 
parking area inside the gates. Swiss Pines Park is 
located on Charlestown Road between Phoenixville 
and Malvern, just south of the Valley Forge General 
Hospital. 

Sunday, April 30, 2:00 P.M., Tyler Arboretum. 
Gertrude Smith Wister, Assistant Director of the 
Scott Foundation, will conduct this tour which will 
feature an extensive collection of wildflowers. Tyler 
Arboretum is in Lima, Pa. and is marked on most 
road maps. Turn oflf Route 452 onto Forge Road at 
the Arboretum historical marker, and meet in the 
parking area at the Arboretum. 

LIBRARY NOTICES 

NEW LIBRARY HOURS: 

9:00 A.M. -5 :00P.M.. Monday through Friday 
except Tuesday 9:00 A. M. - 12:00 Noon. Evenings by 
arrangement with the librarian. 

CORRESPONDENCE COURSES: 

For members who cannot attend the Garden 
Clinics or those who wish to supplement them, there 
are offered by Pennsylvania State University corre- 
spondence courses in Horticulture. Such subjects as 
"Vines, Ground Covers, and Espaliers', 'Rhododendron. 
Azaleas, and Related Plants' to name a few are among 
the list of eleven which are on file in the Society library. 
For further information the 1961 Bulletin (with regis- 
tration blank and description of courses) may be ob- 
tained from : Correspondence Course in Agriculture 
and Home Economics. 202 Agricultural Education 
Building. The Pennsylvania State University, Univer- 
sity Park. Pennsylvania. 

GIFTS: 

Compendium of Plant Diseases. Published by 
Rohm & Haas Company, 264 pages, color plates. 1959. 
From John Haas. Landscape Gardening; Planning - 
Construction Planting by Richard Sudell, London, 480 
pages, illus., 1933 and Landscape; with Shrubs and 
Flowering Trees, New York. 295 pages, illus., 1952. 
From Mrs. Van Horn Ely. 



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DATES to mark on your CALENDAR 



GARDEN CLINICS 

APRIL 6 (Thurs.) 11:00-3:00 (bring lunch) Ambler 
GROWING VEGETABLES AT HOME Mrs. Garra 

APRIL 8 (Saturday) 2:00 P.M. Morris Arboretum 
PLANTING DESIGN: DECIDUOUS TREES Mrs. Garra 

APRIL n (Tuesday) 2:00 P.M. and Gladwynne 

APRIL 15 (Sat.) 2:00 P.M. repeated Mrs. Ballard 

SPRAYING TO CONTROL INSECTS AND DISEASES 

MAY 6 (Saturday) 2:00 P.M. Morris Arboretum 
PLANTING DESIGN: USE OF SHRUBS Mrs. Garra 

MAY 10 (Wednesday) 2:00 P.M. Ambler 

PLANTING FOR LATE SEASON COLOR Mrs. Garra 

MAY 24 (Wednesday) 2:00 P.M. Chestnut Hill 

PLANTING ANNUALS Mrs. Ballard 

Regiiler by using the clip-out coupon below. Send it to 389 
Suburban Station, Philadelphia 3. Registrations will be accepted in 
the order received; confirmation will be made by return post card. 

GARDEN CLINIC I 
REGISTRATION 

Please register me for the Garden Clinic (s) ' 

checked Ijelow. ($2.00 per member per Clinic) i 
D April 6 VEGETABLES 

D April 8 DECIDUOUS TREES | 
n April 11 SPRAYING 

a April 15 SPRAYING (repeated) | 
n May 6 PLANTING DESIGN 

n May 10 PLANTING FOR LATE I 

SEASON COLOR , 

D May 24 PLANTING ANNUALS ' 

Name I 

Address „ | 

Telephone I 

.All registrations are confirmed bv return mail. 



APRIL 11 (Tuesday) (see page 2 for details) 

DAFFODIL DAY 



APRIL 19-20 



(Wednesday - Thursday) 
DAFFODIL SHOW 



Philadelphia National Bank 

1:00-7:30 P.M. 

9:30 -A.M. - 5:00 P.M. 



Broad & Chestnut Sts. 

W'ednesday 

Thursday 



Schedules will l)e mailed to all who exhibited in 
past daffodil shows. Anyone wishing a schedule may 
obtain one by writing or telephoning the Horticultural 
Society (LO 3-8352). 

APRIL 22 (Saturday) (see page 3 for details) 

GARDEN VISITS 

APRIL 29 (Saturday) 

PLANT EXCHANGE 

In the barn at the Frederic Ballard. Jr. residence 
Northwestern Ave. and Thomas Rd., Chestnut Hill. 

All plants jor e.xchange must be received 
before 9:30 A.M. 

Bartering begins at 10:00 A.M. 

More emphasis will be placed on quality this year. 
All unlabeled or questionable plants will go into a 
Bargain Basement; anyone bringing in only Bargain 
Basement material will be able to trade only there. 
In order to be eligible for bartering in the Connois- 
seur's Corner you must provide quality plants for 
that department. Plants of good quality but not of 
unusual merit will earn points for "main floor" trading. 



Coming in May: (details in next month's NEWS) 
MAY 7 AZALEA DAY 

MAY 14 GARDEN VISITS 
MAY 20-21 IRIS SHOW 



THE PENNSYLVANIA 
HORTICULTURAL 



SOCIETY 



1617 PENNSYLVANIA BOULEVARD 
PHILADELPHIA 3. PENNSYLVANIA 



«0R^ 




VOL. II No. 5 



MAY. 1961 



*"rfo MAl>t» 



IRIS TO BE FEATURED IN NEW SHOW 



Probably no other garden perennial has engen- 
dered more enthusiasm for such a variety of reasons 
as has the iris. Not only is this a plant which belongs 
to gardeners but also to plant physiologists, biologists, 
plant breeders and taxonomists as well. Even the 
manufacturers of color film pay special attention to 
iris because of its difficult-to-photograph hues. 

For the gardener the marvelous color variations 
of the iris, coupled with the handsome foliage and the 
stature of clumps in bloom, are enough to stimulate 
his enthusiasm. No other plant provides the jewel-like 
sparkle and such a myriad of subtle color variations. 
Except for one or two problems which are relatively 
easy to control, iris grows almost too well in most 
situations ; in fact it must be divided about every third 
year to maintain maximum vigor and flower size. 

For the amateur plant breeder iris offers a field 
da}-. Because of the structure of the flower, hybridizing 
is easy and requires no special technique other than 
a basic knowledge of the process of transferring pollen 
to stigma. 

Carolus Clusius. in 1557, stated that irises grown 
from seed vary in a wonderful way. This is still true. 
As a result of the passing of the four centuries since 
then, however, there are even more wonderful varia- 
tions today. This is part of the fascination of breeding 
iris, for no two seedlings are ever exactly alike. As a 
re.^ult the amateur iris breeder soon becomes highly 
critical of color, of substance, branching habit and 
hardiness. He is also aware of the al^ility of a par- 
ticular flower to stand up in hot sun, beating rain, and 
all other variations of the elements to which garden 
plants are exposed. Over a period of years the amateur 
iris lireeder has become a highly skilled and knowl- 
edgeable individual. This same amateur has been and 
continues to be responsible for the introduction of 
most important new named varieties. 

While Tall Bearded (German) irises are relatively 
easy to grow from seed there is enough variation in 
germination to whet the appetite of the plant physi- 
ologist to develop techniques to hasten and increase 
the percentage of germination. In crosses which are 



made between species, or between hybrids of diflferent 
specific origin, germination may be practically nil. 
To overcome this problem the physiologist has ex- 
tracted embryos from iris seed and grown them on 
nutrient solution under laboratory conditions. 

For professional plant breeders and geneticists 
iris is becoming nearly as important as the classical 
fruit fly (Drosophila) . Iris lends itself to such basic 
research. In fact, at the present time much progress 
is being made in the microscopic examination of iris 
chromosomes. Because of their variation in shape it 
is possible to trace the ancestry and determine the 
origin of modern irises. It is impossible to measure 
the value of this kind of research, because it often 
leads to new information in fields which, on the surface, 
may seem quite unrelated to iris. 

THE AMERICAN IRIS SOCIETY 

The American Iris Society, which was founded 
in 1921, has attracted the attention of a great many- 
outstanding individuals. Dr. John C. Wister, Director 
of the Scott Horticultural Foundation, Swarthmore 
College, and former Secretary of the Pennsylvania 
Horticultural Society, was one of those instrumental 
in the founding of the Iris Society, and many of the 
names which are and have been important to horti- 
culture through the years have, at some time or other, 
been associated with iris. 

In 1959 the American Iris Society produced an 
important volume. Garden Irises, which was edited by 
Dr. L. F. Randolph of the Department of Botany, 
Cornell University. This is a comprehensive work 
which covers the many facets of iris, both historical 
and 'contemporary, and while it contains much techni- 
cal information it is presented in an interesting and 
easily digested manner for the advanced amateur 
gardener. 

The American Iris Society has been instrumental 
in setting up not only standards for exhibiting and 
judging iris, but it has also established a color classi- 
fication system which is so forward-looking that it 
contains sixteen color classes for which there are yet 

(continued next page) 



IRIS TO BE FEATURED— (continued) 

no known examples. This is true optimism but optim- 
ism with confidence that iris Ijreeders will provide 
these examples in the not too distant future. 

IRIS SHOW 

The Delaware Valley Iris Society, in cooperation 
with the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society, will 
present its first Iris Show on May 20-21, in the T V 
Guide Building at Radnor. Anyone who grows named 
iris is eligible to enter specimen blooms in this show. 
^Members of the Iris Society will be on hand to help 
classify entries and get them into their proper places. 
Arrangement classes are also provided in the schedule. 
The Show is open free to the public from 2 to 9 P. M. 
on Saturday, May 20, and 12 to 5 P. M. on Sunday, 
May 21. Both exhibitors and visitors are requested 
to use the Radnor-Chester Road entrance of the build- 
ing. Schedules are available by telephoning or writing 
the Horticultural Society. Chairman of the Show is 
Mrs. John E. Johansen, of Kirklyn. President of the 
Delaware \'alley Iris Society is Mr. William T. Hirsch, 
of Havertown. 

RECOMMENDATIONS 

The Variety Selections Committee of the Delaware 
Valley Iris Society recommends the following fifty 
irises for the Greater Delaware Valley : 

* May be purchased jot $1 or less — others less than $4. 



White 

Cliffs of Dover* 

Tranquility* 

New Snow* 

Wedding Bouquet 

Snow Goddess 

Ice Carnival 
Yellow 

Desert Song* 

Foxfire* 

Truly Yours 

Limelight 

Phoebus Apollo 
Violet 

\'iolet Harmony* 

Vatican Purple* 

First Violet 

Big Game 
Red 

Ranger* 

Ebony Echo* 

Hyblaze 
Apricot 

Top Flight* 

Frances Kent 
Amoena 

Pinnacle* 

( standard - white) 
(falls - yellow) 
Plicata (veined) 

Caroline Jane* 
( white with blue) 

Paper Doll 

( white with orchid rose) 
Blue 

Blue Sapphire* 

Helen McGregor* 

Chivalry* 

Pierre Menard* 

Rchobeth 

Sierra Skic.« 



Pink (Flamingo Pink 

Happy Birthday* 
Paradise Pink* 
May Hall 
June Meredith 
(Orchid or lilac pink) 
Pastella* 
Crispette 
Alay Magic 
Mary Randall 
Brown & Tan 
Inca Chief* 
Hermit Thrush 
Beechleaf 
Black (blue-black) 
Black Hills* 
Black Taffeta 
(red-black) 

Sable Night 
Green 

Green Mohr* 
Neglecta 

Helen Collingwood* 
(standard - blue-white) 
(falls - violet purple) 
Miscellaneous 
Majorette 

red-violet bi-color 
Cascade Splendor* 

pinkish apricot blend 
Patrician, white, overlay of 

barium yellow on falls 
Lady Mohr* 

(standards - oyster white) 
(falls - greenish yellow 
with violet) 
Rosy \'eil, white, edge of 
cobalt or rosy heliotrope 
Palomino*, creamy white, 
petal borders edged 
apricot-pink 



NEW BOOKS IN THE LIBRARY 

Many new works have been added to the Society's 
library collection in recent months. Members are sure 
to find the following books especiall}' useful. 

The Fern Guide; Northeastern and Midland United 
States by Edgar T. Wherry. Doubleday (^Xature 
Guide 9), 318 pages, illus., 1961. $3.9'5 

From the fern lover who enjoys these plants 
growing in his shady crevices and yards to the 
most expert pteridologist, this book is invaluable. 
It contains 135 species (clearly illustrated — habit 
sketches to spores — by James C. W. Chen) and 
major variants. Prof. Wherry's indexes include 
authors of fern names and the significance of 
species and lesser names. J^Iost Pennsylvanians 
are not disturbed to see the spelling pensylvanicum, 
they know it is the old way, but they may have to 
refer to the glossary for telmateria or hyemale 
and other such names which are well defined. 

Greenhouse Gardening as a Hobby by James Under- 
wood Crockett. Doubledav, 281 pages, illus., 1961. 
$4.95. 

Author of Window Sill Gardening (also avail- 
able in the Society library). If you do not have 
a greenhouse, after reading this book, plans soon 
will be started for making one. Many types of 
greenhouses are described including furnishings 
and climate control. Some chapter titles are : 
'Where plants come from', 'Anyone can grow 
orchids', 'Battle of the bugs', 'Greenhouse stretch- 
ers', and '\\'hat to do and when to do it." 

All About Begonias by Bernice Brilmayer. Doubleday 
223 pages, illus.,' 1960. $4.95. 

(Forward bj- Clarence Hall, President of the 
American Begonia Society which says: "You'll 
read about plants growing six feet tall, with great 
pendent clusters of flowers. You'll discoxer some 
fascinating oddities ; the trailers and climbers ; 
the low-growing rhizomatous types that send up 
airy sprays of flowers in spring; the miniatures 
and the giants.") Written in expert but non- 
technical style, this book is both inspiring and 
practical. The author gives helpful information 
on selecting, growing and propagating 675 types 
of begonias. 

Fuchsias for all Purposes by Thomas Thorne. W. H. 
& L. Collingridge Ltd.. London, 175 pages, illus.. 
1959. $4.20. 

The author. Britain's expert on fuchias. plant 
collector of new species from Central and South 
America and writer of fuchsia articles in American 
horticultural magazines, divides this book into 
two parts. The first discusses the origin, adapta- 
tion, cultivation, management, propagation and 
hybridization, training, pests and diseases, and 
exhibiting. An alphabetical list of species, hy- 
brids and varieties comprises part two. In this 
country, however, one must go to California in 
order to see the most sumptuous collections of 
fuchsias. 

(cont'd page 3, col. 2) 



SPECIAL BONSAI SESSION 

The Membershi]) Committee of The Pennsylvania 
Horticultural Society is inviting all members who 
signed the Bonsai card in the Membership Lounge at 
the Philadelphia Flower Show to a special program 
on this subject on Tuesday. May 2, at 7:30 P.M., in 
the rooms of the Society. Ernesta Drinker Ballard and 
R. Gwj'nne Stout, both members of the Executive 
Council of the Society and Bonsai enthusiasts, will 
discuss Bonsai, show examples of their work, and 
answer members' questions. 

Other members wishing to attend are requested 
to telephone the Society, LO 3-8352. 

MAY GARDEN VISITS 

The May Garden Visits of the Pennsylvania 
Horticultural Societj' take place on Sunday, May 14, 
3:00-7:00 P. M. in Rydal, Huntingdon Valley & Bryn 
Athyn. Detailed route instructions for reaching each 
garden are included in the Garden Visits folder which 
was inserted in last months NEWS. The third Garden 
Visits day of 1961 takes place Sunday, September 17. 

SUNDAY, May 14 

Mr. & Mrs. H. Thomas Hallowell, Jr., (Rydal). 
A garden of special interest for its boxwood maze, fine 
collection of azaleas, rhododendrons and other broad- 
leaf evergreens, with woodland paths overlooking a 
lovely pond and stream. 

Mr. & Mrs. C. Brewster Rhoads, "Chilton" (Hunt- 
ingdon Valley). An old manor house, the garden of 
Chilton includes flower boarders, orchard, greenhouse, 
a pool and a small mill stream. 

Mrs. Harold F. Pitcairn, (Bryn Athyn). A garden 
on many levels, it provides breath-taking views of 
distant landscape as well. A wild flower trail leads 
through a colorful woodland. 

Mr. & Mrs. Carl Asplundh, (Bryn Athyn). The 
unity of house, greenhouse and gardens of this prop- 
erty is impressive. Fine plant materials are stressed 
and a functional Japanese tea house at the edge of 
pool would delight any gardener. 



BUS RESERVATION 

GARDEN VISITS 
Sunday, May 14, 1961 

Application with payment ($1.50) must 
reach the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society, 
389 Suburban Station Building, Philadelphia 
3. at least one week before date of event. 



Name 



Addr 



Clip this corner and mail 



NEW BOOKS IN LIBRARY— (cont'd from page 2) 

Primroses by Roy Genders. John GiiTord, Ltd., Lon- 
don, 171 pages, illus., 1959. $2.55. 

This delightful little book includes poems, 
quaint forms of the primrose, the common and 
double primrose, qualities, culture, propagation, 
hybridizing, primroses for exhibition and home 
decoration, for window box growing and pests 
and diseases. Because of the primrose leaf struc- 
ture the plants survive city soot. It would be nice 
to see the brilliant color of primroses in more 
city window boxes. 

Flowers: Free Form-Interpretive Design by M. Benz. 

San Jacinto Pub. Co., Houstin, 247 pages, illus., 
1960. $15.00. 

From Mr. Benz's inspiring presentation of his 
new concept in floral design "where true creative 
ability finds freedom of expression" one cannot 
help but feel that this book which touches upon 
floral art throughout history is another expression 
of gracious living. Twenty-two periods of floral 
art, starting in 500 BC and continuing today are 
described. 

Rhododendrons and Azaleas; Their Origins, Cultiva- 
tion and Development 2d ed. by Clement Gray 
Bowers (with illustrations in color by Frank 
Taylor Bowers and the author). Macmillan, 525 
pages, 1960. $25.00. 

Written for the horticulturalist (as was the 
first classic edition 25 years ago), hardiness and 
merit ratings have been changed due to modern 
research methods and contacts with growers over 
a wide range of conditions (tropical to arctic). 
Also, new information on the nutrition, physiolog)" 
and plant propagation (extended and revised lists 
of clones), revised bibliography and translation 
of a German systematic arrangement of the genus. 
On the binding paper of this book are maps of the 
Rhododendron Regions of the Old and of the 
New World. 

The Rhododendron and Camellia Year Book 1961. 

Royal Horticultural Society, 149 pages. 

Numerous articles on rhododendrons and camel- 
lias including "Rhododendron schlippenbachii in 
New Jersey" by Edward O. Birch. 

The Lily Year Book 1961. Royal Horticultural Society, 
116 pages. 

Articles by more than twenty lily specialists, of 
particular interest are the problems of lilies and 
lily growing in North America discussed by 
George L. Slate. 

The International Lily Register compiled by Gillian 
E. Peterson. Royal Horticultural Society, 110 
pages. 1960. $2.00. 

The Daffodil and Tulip Year Book 1961. Royal Horti- 
cultural Society, 206 pages. 

Included in this annual volume is an article by 
Willis H. Wheeler, "American daffodil shows 
west, south and east." 



SlNBAi 9NliidS ^ 
MOHS Slill ^ 



9992 'ON ilVNaad 
•ej 'Pn^d|epB|njj 

a I V d 

isvisod s n 




DATES to mark on 
GARDEN CLINICS 

MAY 6 (Saturday) 2:00 P.M. Morris Arboretum 
PLANTING DESIGN: USE OF SHRUBS Martha L. Garra 
A comprehensive treatment of the importance of 

shrubs in the garden and how best to use them. 

MAY 10 (Wednesday) 2:00 P.M. Ambler 

PLANTING FOR LATE SEASON COLOR Mrs. Garra 

How to provide late color with annuals and 

perennials grown from seed and cuttings. 

MAY 24 (Wednesday) 2:00 P.M. Chestnut Hill 
PLANTING ANNUALS Ernesta Drinker Ballard 

Basic planting techniques especially for new 

gardeners. 

MAY 31 (Wednesday) 2:00 P.M. Gladwyne 

YEAR 'ROUND USE OF YOUR COLDFRAME Mrs. Ballard 
Getting the most from a coldframe for a better 

garden. 

Register by using the clip-out coupon below. Send it to 389 
Suburban Station, Philadelphia .?. Registrations will be accepted in 
the order received; confirmation will be made by return post card. 



GARDEN CLINIC 
REGISTRATION 

Please register me for the Garden Clinic(s) 
checked below. ($2.00 per member per Clinic) 
D April 6 USE OF SHRUBS 
n May 10 PLANTING FOR 

LATE COLOR 
n May 24 PLANTING ANNUALS 
D May 31 USING YOUR COLDFRAME 

Name 

Address 

Telephone _ 

All registrations are confirmed by return mail. 



your CALENDAR 

APRIL 29 (Saturday) 

PLANT EXCHANGE 

In the barn at the Frederic Ballard, Jr. residence 
Northwestern Ave. and Thomas Rd., Chestnut Hill. 

All plants for exchange must be received 
before 9:30 A.M. 

Bartering begins at 10:00 A.M. 

More emphasis will be placed on quality this year. 
All unlabeled or questionable plants will go into a 
Bargain Basement ; anyone bringing in only Bargain 
Basement material will he able to trade only there. 
In order to be eligible for bartering in the Connois- 
seur's Corner you must provide quality plants for 
that department. Plants of good quality but not of 
unusual merit will earn points for "main floor" trading. 



MAY 7 (Sunday) 



Azalea Garden 



AZALEA DAY 



Fairmount Pai 



An Azalea Information Center will be set up 
the Society's Azalea Garden and will be staffed frc 
ten o'clock in the morning until five in the afterno' 
The over 2,000 plants in the garden are expected 
reach their peak of bloom for the event. 



MAY 14 (Saturday) 



(see page 3 for details) 



GARDEN VISITS 

MAY 18 (Thursday) 

RITTENHOUSE SQUARE FLOWER MARKET 

MAY 20 - 21 (Saturday - Sunday) 

DELAWARE VALLEY IRIS SHOW 

T.V. Guide Building Radnor, 

Saturday 2:00 P.M., Sunday 12:00-5:00 P.M. 



Pa. 



THE PENNSYLVANIA 
HORTICULTURAL 



SOCIETY 



1617 PENNSYLVANIA BOULEVARD 
PHILADELPHIA 3. PENNSYLVANIA 

r- ■ . ■ '!j 'to»o ■iv.v.',.' ',''g:;njn.'aiic.'.i;-/S'r-a 



'klSm^ 




VOL II No. 6 



JU^£, 



'n M*»o* 2 



r 



MANY ITEMS OF INTEREST TO MEMBERS 



RABBIT REPELLENTS 

Last year, after a deluge of complaints about 
trying to keep rabbits out of the vegetable patch — and 
every other part of the garden, for that matter — we 
asked members of the Society to send in reports of 
their successes (and lack of them) with this problem. 

The most popular control material proved to be 
dried blood, a fertilizer product available in most 
garden centers. By ringing individual plants, beds, or 
a whole garden with this material, you can create a 
sort of rabbit 'no man's land'. Evidently, rabbits do 
not like the odor. One member, who had been losing 
many tulips in early spring, reported especially 
gratifying results. 

Black pepper, sprinkled around choice plants, 
seems to work, too, as do partially submerged coke 
bottles (the air passing over the open mouth of the 
container is supposed to make a sound unpleasing to 
rabbits) but we received no reports from members 
using any of the commercial repellents. 

For vegetable plots, where plants are set in rows, 
black plastic mulch is reported to keep rabbits away. 
This is especially useful in the weekend garden or in 
one which is left untended for long periods, but ex- 
tended use of black plastic mulches can lead to other 
problems, such as a build up of root attacking fungi. 

One enterprising member hit the key to rabbit 
control, we think, when she noted that if there is 
plenty of clover nearby, the rabbits do not bother 
other plants. While some lawn makers lothe the 
presence of clover in their grass, it might prove to 
be the ideal turf where the rabbit exists. In areas at 
the edge of the garden you could serve up a succulent 
feast before the trouble-makers advance far enough 
to reach the lettuce and phlox. 

This same approach to rabbit control in winter 
was suggested by an enterprising nurseryman who 
had placed cut branches of old apple trees and similar 
prunings around choice crab apples. The rabbits ate 
the bark from the cut branches, and the trunks of the 
choice trees came through the winter unharmed — 
"If you can't fight 'em, . . ." 



CLASS 46 

The popular Class 46 has been included for several 
years in The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society's 
Chrysanthemum Show at Swarthmore. The show in 
undergoing reorganization and the final date and place 
has not been set. Additional information will be 
included in the July NEWS. 

In this class, exhibitors are given three potted, 
rooted cuttings of an undisclosed variety by the 
Society. Exhibitors are required to show all plants. 

The David Leslie Poe Memorial Award will be 
presented to anyone winning first prize in this class 
three times. It has been twice won by two exhibitors 
but as yet, no one has earned possession of the trophy. 
Winners have been Mrs. H. Morell La Rue (1954), 
Mrs. Thomas U. Schock (1955-6), Otis S. Reynolds 
(1957-8), Walter F. Rathmell (1959) and Mrs. Elliot 
Deland (1950). 

This project is limited to fifty participants. Entries 
are accepted in writing, in the order received, at the 
Society office, 389 Suburban Station Building, Phila- 
delphia 3. Instructions for picking up the plants will 
be mailed upon receipt of entries. 

BONSAI FEATURED 

Eighteen members of the Society attended a 
special session on bonsai which was held in the 
Society's rooms on Tuesday evening. May 2. Mrs. 
John B. Carson and Mr. and Mrs. Frederic L. Ballard, 
Jr. lead the round table discussion. Mrs. Ballard pre- 
sented soil, potting and feeding information. Mrs. 
Carson discussed some of the bonsai which were 
shown and Mr. Ballard pruned and wired a small 
arborvitae to demonstrate the procedure for starting 
a bonsai. This plant was given as a door prize to 
Miss Beulah R. Green of Swarthmore. 

Members of this group were invited to a Bonsai 
Afternoon at the home of Dr. and Mrs. Carson, New- 
town Square, on Sunday, May 28 at three o'clock. 
Everyone attending is requested to bring at least one 
Bonsai or a plant suitable for training as such. (In 
case of rain, the meeting will be postponed.) 

Members of the Society who would like to attend 
are asked to telephone the office (LO 3-8352) for 
route instructions. 



GARDEN CLINICS GROUP 
VISITS LAWN TESTS 

The lawn clinic conducted at General Arnold 
Field in Wynnewood proved both interesting and 
helpful to the participants. This location was picked 
because it has ten or more well kept demonstration 
plots of turf grass which make invaluable teaching 
aids in the study of lawn management. 

These plots, which are roughly 800 square feet 
each, were planned and planted cooperatively by the 
Delaware Valley Turf Grass Association and Penn- 
sylvania State University in order to have examples 
of the various kinds of grass which can be grown in 
southeastern Pennsylvania. Included are Kentucky, 
and Delta bluegrasses, Pennlawn and Illahee fescue, 
Kentucky 31 and Alta fescue. Highland bent and 
Bermuda grass. All are in a vigorous, healthy state 
due to the fine growing conditions at this location. 
The drainage is good, the sun is full, and fertilizer is 
applied regularly at recommended rates. An interest- 
ing but not conclusive observation is that in the 
year of the drought (1957) the only plots that survived 
the summer were the three planted with Merion 
blue. Kentucky 31 fescue and Bermuda. 

.Anyone who is seriously interested in lawn man- 
agement would profit by stopping at General Arnold 
Field on Montgomery Avenue (opposite Lower Merion 
High School) two or three times during the course 
of the season to observe the behavior of the various 
grasses. The cool growing conditions that prevail in 
spring and fall favor some, while others thrive in the 
heat of July and August. Summer Jawn clinics will 
again take advantage of these plots (see below). 

SUMMER CLINICS 

June 22. Thursday, 7:00 P.M., Ambler 

GARDEN MAINTENANCE which includes 
mulching, watering, summer feeding, spraying, 
composting. 

July 11, Tuesday, 7:00 P.M., Chestnut Hill 

GARDEN TECHNIQUES which includes 
staking, disbudding, pinching, soil fumigation 
(sterilization) and other garden techniques. 

July 18. Tuesday, 10:00 A.M., Ambler 

SOWING SEEDS IN SUMMER — biennials, 
perennials (pansies, foxglove, sweet William, can- 
terbury bells, candytuft and many other plants.) 

August 5, Saturday, 10:00 A.M., Chestnut Hill 

SUMMER CUTTINGS the propagation of 
holly, taxus, azaleas, camellias, evergreen ground 
cover etc — Members take home a flat of cuttings. 

August 12, Saturday. 10:00 A.M., Wynnewood 

COPING WITH 
SUMMER LAWN PROBLEMS 



MARY BULL REBMANN 

Mary B. Rebmann (Mrs. G. Ruhland Rebmann, 
Jr.) possessed and expressed an abundant love for gar- 
dening; thus The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society 
was welcome to draw on her wealth of knowledge and 
good judgment until her death on April 19th. And 
what pleasure she took in serving the Society ! She 
never forgot that gardening should be joyous and 
she instilled this viewpoint in everyone whose privilege 
it was to come in contact with her in this field. Those 
of us with whom she shared her plants (and we are 
many) will tend them with especial care and remember 
our generous friend's guiding spirit. She, like Mrs. 
Arthur Hoyt Scott used to say, "Put the plant where 
it wants to grow then it will reward you." 

The Rebmann garden in Gladwyne was opened 
to the Garden Visits twice in four years; once immed- 
iately after Mr. and Mrs. Rebmann built there, to 
show what could be done quickly, and again last year 
so members of the Society might study the develop- 
ment of the garden and plants. 

A member of the Society since 1928, Mrs. Reb- 
mann became a Life Member in 1943 and was elected 
to the Council in 1947. She served on nearly every 
committee as well as taking the responsibilitj^ of 
membership on the Executive Council. For a number 
of years her well written items filled the Society's 
section of HORTICULTURE. 

Because of her unusual ability to organize and 
follow through any project she undertook, the staff 
always found it a pleasure to carry out the directions 
she formulated. 

On the Council, her opinion was sound and was 
given after deliberation, with humor and kindness. 
In the tradition of other dedicated individuals who 
have served the Society before her, Mary Bull 
Rebmann has added to our gardening heritage. 



FLOWER SHOW CLASSES ANNOUNCED 

The committee responsible for the amateur horti- 
cultural classes in the Society's section of the Phila- 
delphia Flower Show has announced the following 
classes: 

Class 612: Pansy, Lake of Thun, grown from seed and 
shown in a cedar flat 9" by 13" by 3". 

Class 613: Begonia semperflorens, Cinderella Rose, 
grown from seed and shown in a clay 
pot of any size. 

Class 620: Primula polyantha (yellow) — eight plants 
grown from seed and shown in 3" pots 
placed in a cedar flat 9" by 13" by 3". 

Orders for seed must reach the Society by mail 
before June 20. Seed will be mailed directly from 
supplier. Prices: Pansy $1.00, Begonia 25c, Primula 
$1.00. Seeds will be received during July and early 
August. 



LIBRARY 

. . . books for summer reading 

Our member, John C. Wister, sent this review: 
"Of the many garden books that come to my desk in 
the course of a year, few, if any, have pleased me as 
much as Gardens in Winter by Elizabeth Lawrence 
[Harper & Brothers, 218 pages, illus., 1961. $4.50]. 
Perhaps it is because it is so utterly different from 
any garden book I have read in years. 

"The information given is primarily for Virginia 
and the Carolinas, but there is a good deal of reference 
to which of the plants are valuable in winter in our 
Middle or New England States. While the use of 
plants in winter is an important subject for any gar- 
dener, it is a subject that has been much neglected. 
It is not, however, only this information which makes 
me enthusiastic over the book. 

I think there must be a good many horticul- 
turalists who, like myself, like to know what other 
horticulturalists are doing. I personally have been 
very fortunate in knowing a good many of the prom- 
inent horticulturalists across the country. What Miss 
Lawrence s book did for me was to show me once 
again how very much we owe to many of the people 
that she mentioned. The book is full of quotations 
from letters from her friends or from publications 
of some of our great foreign horticulturalists like 
E. A. Bowles. The book makes you feel that you knew 
many of these and I feel, for this reason, that it is 
going to bring additional pleasures to many gardeners 
after they have read Miss Lawrence's text and learned 
what people like Mr. Bowles, Alec Gray, Mr. Krippen- 
dorf. Caroline Dorman and many, many others have 
written to her. 

"I don't want to disparage the information given 
about trees and shrubs and flowers valuable in the 
winter months, but to me the pleasure of the book 
was in the general background of the joys of gardening 
and a glimpse of the delightful friendships Miss 
Lawrence has made." 

A Fresh Herb Platter by Dorothy Childs Hogner. 
Doubleday, 237 pages, illus.. 1961. $3.95. 

What gardener-gourmet would not want his 
personal copy of this book? Contents: a vegetable 
and herb garden, a garden salad bowl, of good 
garden loam, on the terrace and window shelf, 
Aux Fines Herbes, salad bowl and vegetable pot, 
to braise-broil-stew, from the fish market, the 
beginning and end of a meal, and before winter 
comes. 

Campanulas and BelWowers in Cultivation by H. 

H. Clifford Crook. Blandford Press, London, 90 
pages, illus.. 1959. $2.00. 

This book gives the author's personal exper- 
iences about cultivation of campanulas and related 
genera in borders, rock and wild gardens, and 
under glass in England. 



The American Camellia Yearbook edited by Joseph H. 
Pyron. American Camellia Societv, 293 pages, 
illus., 1960. 

Articles on Franklin's Tree (reprint), virus and 
diseases, breeding, cold resistance, and landscaping 
are included. 

Getting Started with Rhododendrons and Azaleas by 
H. Harold Clarke. Doubleday, 268 pages, illus., 
1960. $4.95. 

This third book by Mr. Clarke to be added to 
our library (Rhododendrons, 1956 and Small Fruits 
jor Your Home Garden, 1958) provides informative 
material for novice rhododendron and azalea gar- 
deners which includes : origin, special require- 
ments, culture, fertilization, pest control, and 
garden species and varieties. 

Plant Propagation Ijy Hudson T. Hartmann and Dale 
E. Kester. Prentice-Hall. 559 pages, illus., 1959. 
$8.75. 

Every serious-minded horticulturalist will find 
this textbook the most modern and complete 
reference source for basic plant propagation prac- 
tices. An excellent table for 'Flowering Plants 
Grown from Specialized Stems or Roots' was con- 
sulted by our member, Mrs. Henry W. Breyer, Jr., 
in regard to the 'true bulb' class at the March 
Flower Show. 

The Yearbook of Agriculture 1960; Power to Produce. 

U. S. Government Printing Office. 490 pages, 
illus., $2.25. 

With the Smithsonian's Museum of History and 
Technology now under construction the 1960 
Yearbook is an interesting compilation in the 
field of agriculture. 



GIFTS 

Gifts to the Library : Lilies for Garden and Green- 
house, rev. ed, by D. T. Macfie. London, 151 pages. 
1947, (from George R. Clark) ; Flowering Crab Apples 
by Arie den Boer, (mentioned in NEWS 11:10, from 
Mrs. J. Norman Henry) : Versuche ueber Pflanzen- 
hybriden by Gregor Mendel, 47 pages, 1865 (reprint 
1960, from Ann Waterman) ; and for an indefinate loan 
Pardisi in Sole by John Parkinson, London, 612 pages, 
16 colored plates, 1656, (from Richard Thomson). 

AZALEA BUYER'S GUIDE AVAILABLE 

An Azalea Buyer's Guide, compiled for the 
Society's Azalea Day on May 7 is available to mem- 
bers. It contains a list of over 100 azaleas grouped 
according to color which are available from nurseries 
in the Delaware Valley area. For a copy write (389 
Suburban Station Building. Philadelphia 3) or 
telephone (LO 3-8352) the Society. 



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DATES to mark on your CALENDAR 

GARDEN CLINICS JUNE 4 (Sunday) 2:00 P. M. 



Morris Arboretum 



MAY 31 (Wednesday) 2:00 P.M. Chestnut Hill 

YEAR 'ROUND USE OF YOUR COLDFRAME Mrs. Ballard 
The most from a coldframe for a better garden. 

JUNE 22 (Thursday) 7:00 P.M. Ambler 

GARDEN MAINTENANCE Mrs. Garra 

Mulching, watering, summer feeding, composting. 

JULY 11 (Tuesday) 7:00 P.M. Chestnut Hill 

GARDEN TECHNIQUES Mrs. Ballard 

Staking, dis1)udding, pinching, soil fumigation 

(sterilization) and other techniques. 

JULY 18 (Tuesday) 10:00 A.M. Ambler 

SOWING SEEDS IN SUMMER Mrs. Garra 

Biennials, perennials (pansies. foxglove, sweet 

William, canterbury bells, candytuft and other plants). 

Register fcv using the clip-out coupon below. Send it to 389 
Suburban Station. Philadelphia .9. Registrations will be accepted in 
the order received: confirmation will be made by return post card. 



GARDEN CLINIC 

REGISTRATION 

Please register me for the Garden Clinic(s) 
checked below. ($2.00 per member per Clinic) 
D May 31 YEAR 'ROUND USE OF 

YOUR COLDFRAME 
n June 22 GARDEN MAINTENANCE 
D July 11 GARDEN TECHNIQUES 
n July 18 SOWING SEEDS IN SUMMER 



Name _ „ 

Address _ 

Telephone _ 

All registrations are confirmed by return mail. 



WALKING TOUR 



Ernesta Drinker Ballard (Mrs. Frederic L. 
Ballard, Jr.), a member of the Executive Council of 
The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society, will conduct 
this tour which is planned to emphasize the particular- 
ly outstanding specimens of mature evergreen and 
deciduous trees in this fine, old arboretum. Members 
are asked to use the Hillcrest Avenue gate which is 
about half way between Stenton and Germantown 
Avenues. Parking is permitted on both sides of Hill- 
crest Avenue. Members will gather just inside the 
gate before the tour starts. 



JUNES (Monday) 10:00 A.M. Morris Arboretum 
ROSE SESSION 

Members who signed the rose card in the mem- 
ber's lounge at The Philadelphia Flower Show have 
been invited to a special session on the care and culture 
of roses conducted by Richard Thomson of Wynne- 
wood, a member of the Executive Council of the 
Society and author of many articles and books on this 
subject. The session will take place Monday, June 5, 
10:00 A.M. at the Morris Arboretum. A few other 
members will be allowed to attend, but in order to 
keep the group at a workable size, it will be necessary 
to telephone the office of the Society to reserve a place. 
There is no charge for this program. 



THE PENNSYLVANIA 

HORTICULTURAL 

SOCIETY 


P^^^^ 


VOL 

i 


. II 


No 


. 7 


JULY, 1961 


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1617 PENNSYLVANIA BOULEVARD 
PHILADELPHIA 3. PENNSYLVANIA 


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THE FIRST BUDGET LANDSCAPE TO BE DEMONSTRATED 



The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society as part of 
its new policy of greater service to the public and to 
its members, will stage a unique and instructive 
demonstration of home landscaping when a Center 
Square (Pa.) house acquires a complete garden in one 
week. The demonstration is scheduled for the week 
of June 26. 

Called "The President" by Altman Builders of 
Bala Cynwyd who are co-operating with the Society 
to make this demonstration possible, the house is in 
their Center Square Green development, just off 
Route 202, north of Norristown. 

Following closely the concepts of the book, 
Budget Landscaping, by Carlton B. Lees, Director of 
the Society, the Center Square demonstration will 
illustrate how a treeless property can be converted 
into useful outdoor space which is also attractive and 
comfortable. Panel exhibits will illustrate the design 
development of the plan, the purpose of each element 
in the garden, and how such landscaping can be carried 
out in a series of steps scheduled to fit the budget and 
do-it-yourself energy of nearly every family. It will 
also emphasize the importance of a landscape plan, 
no matter how small the property or simple its 
development. The plan allows step by step building 
of the garden, and insures that each object or feature 
will fall into its proper place. 

The two story, four bedroom house around which 
the demonstration garden is to be built, has a stone 
front and a porch in the manner of a Pennsylvania 
country house. Since it faces southwest, three shade 
trees and four flowering trees will be used to create 
an inviting approach from the street, to cool the walls 
of the house, and to increase the usefulness of the 
porch. No foundation planting is used, as such, 
because foundation planting cannot be seen and en- 
joyed from indoors. Instead, the plantings are pulled 
out into the space of the front yard to create a simpli- 
fied entry garden. A three foot high hurdle fence with 
vines and an espaliered shrub or two attached to it, 
provides some separation from the completely public 
street. 

The fence also serves as a sort of 'backbone' to 



tie together, designwise, the trees, low growing ever- 
green shrubs, and color producing roses and annuals 
on each side of it. While this planting provides pro- 
tection to the porch and creates a friendly gathering 
place for family and friends, it also provides views 
to be enjoyed from the living room and dining room, 
both of which have windows facing the street. 

What might have been an awkward half-moon 
shaped plot between the house and driveway has been 
tied closely to the front yard planting so it provides 
a vista as one approaches the front door. Perhaps 
more important, it also provides a pleasant scene to 
view from the dining roofn and that all important 
window over the kitchen sink. A garden view with 
a flowering tree can relieve the chore of dishwashing, 
with delicate spring flowers, cool summer foliage, 
bright autumn color, and with a bird feeder nearby, 
the tree performs well even in winter. 

In the backyard, a family sized outdoor living 
room is created by an attractive pattern of bricks 
on sand, for the floor, by a L-shaped section of hurdle 
fence draped with vines and a few shrubs with color- 
ful annuals in front of them, for a privacy wall, and 
by a ceiling of the leafy branches of five flowering 
crabapples. The result is a thoroughly useful, easy 
to maintain and attractive living space which is con- 
veniently close to the kitchen, to the garage (garden 
tool storage) and takes advantage of the cooling 
shadow cast by the house in the late afternoons of 
summer. 

A small salad garden, blueberries, and a plot for 
an abundance of cut flowers is nearby. The remainder 
of the backyard is open play space for children. 

Since "The President" is one of three exhibit 
houses from which prospective buyers make their 
choice, Altman Builders and Developers will maintain 
'his house and garden for an estimated three years 
before it is finally sold. During this period it will be 
open to the public, and the Society will continue to 
guide the garden's development. The garage will be 
converted into an exhibition roorn in which will be 
displayed information about the garden and The 
Pennsylvania Horticultural Society. 

(continued page 3, column I) 



WINTER DAMAGE QUESTIONS PLENTIFUL 

Now that spring has grown into early summer and 
trees and shrubs have had a chance to make new 
growth, it is hoped that the great many members 
who were alarmed with the appearance of these plants 
have found that winter damage was not as bad as 
was anticipated. While many of the broadleaf ever- 
greens were completely defoliated, in most cases, new 
leaves have appeared and the plants are well on their 
way to recovery. The evergreen magnolia (M. grandi- 
flora) and pyracantha stimulated the most questions 
because of loss of leaves, but where these plants grow 
in more severe winter situations than eastern Penn- 
sylvania, such defoliation is common. Some English 
hollies were almost completely without leaves by mid- 
April, but in most of these examples, new leaves are 
developing. Some killing of tips and smaller twigs 
occurred, but new growth appears below the dead 
wood and it is an easy matter to prune it out now 
that the dividing line between live and dead is evident. 
Plants of holly and evergreen magnolia which were 
most severely defoliated are somewhat slower than 
normal in developing new growth. An extra boost 
can be given with one of the water-soluable fertilizers 
such as Ra-pid-gro or Gro-stuf which can be applied 
directly to the foliage. Three or four feedings at 
weekly intervals combined with a good mulch and 
moisture supply are especially important. Be sure to 
end such feeding by mid-July, however, to insure 
maturing of the new foliage before frosts. 

BOXWOOD 

Most severely damaged of all, perhaps, was the 
boxwood. Such comments as, "This just isn't the 
climate for boxwood," are common. Yet there are 
many fine old specimens in the greater Philadelphia 
area which have been growing here for over a hundred 
years — the advent of one severe winter should not 
determine the future of this plant in this area. True, 
an unfortunate, heavy snowstorm in 1958 ruined many 
plants, too, but it may be a long time before these 
two incidents repeat themselves. 

Boxwood, this winter, showed striking variations 
in degree of damage. In some cases old plants were 
actually killed, roots and all ; in others, hardly a leaf 
was burned. The difference is mostly due to location : 
exposure to winter sun (both direct and reflected 
rays), to winter winds, to the amount of snow cover- 
ing a given plant, and to its cultural condition. All 
of these factors are so intricately interwoven that it 
is difficult to lay blame to any one. In one member's 
garden, a row of small boxwood plants showed a 
striking spot of brown, sun-killed foliage on the south- 
west quarter of each and every plant in the row. At 
the other extreme, where two plants were growing 
side by side in another garden, one was dead and 
the other hardly damaged. What about drainage and 
water supply before winter began? What about the 
maturity of the foliage at the onset of severe weather? 
And wl]at about the condition of the cambium — that 
thin layer of green tissue beneath the bark which 

(cont'd page 3, column I) 



1962 PHILADELPHIA FLOWER SHOW 
HORTICULTURAL CLASSES FOR AMATEURS 

Sunday, March 11 
Class 

600 TRUMPET NARCISSUS Burgemeester Gouver- 
neur or Unsurpassable, forced and shown in an 
8 inch bulb pan. 

601 HYACINTH L'Innocence or Arentine Arendsen, 
forced and shown in an 8 inch bulb pan. 

602 SMALL (MINOR) BULBS, (including corms, 
rhizomes, tubers) one variety, forced and shown 
in a 6 inch bulb pan. 

603 GLOXINIA, Flowering plant any size or age. 

604 SPRING WINDOW SILL, a collection of house- 
plants suitable for south window, grown by exhib- 
itor for at least three months, not to exceed 3 feet 
long, 12 inches wide and 3 feet high. 

605 BONSAI, miniature plants, largest dimensions 
including container not to exceed 6 inches. 

606 TULIP Rising Sun or General de Wet (or 
deWet), forced and shown in an 8 inch bulb pan. 

607 ROOTED CUTTINGS, one or more varieties of 
hardy, broad-leafed evergreens or shrubs, ready 
for potting, grown in cedar flat 9 by 13 by 3 inches. 
Each entry to be accompanied by one cutting with 
visible root development in a plastic bag. 

608 TOPIARY IVY (all week), named variety (s) of 
Hedera, grown and trained in shape of a bird not 
to exceed 34 inches in width, 18 inches in height. 

609 LARGE CUP NARCISSUS Champagne or Lyon. 
forced and shown in an 8 inch bulb pan. 

610 HYACINTH City of Haarlem, forced and shown 
in an 8 inch bulb pan. 

611 A LIVING EXHIBIT OF HORTICULTURAL 
MERIT OR INTEREST, one plant grown by ex- 
hibitor and not exceeding 4 feet in height or 3 feet 
in width. Judges will comment on horticultural 
skill, decorativeness and originality, (not in 
competition) 

Wednesday, March 14 
Class 

612 PANSY Lake of Thun, grown from seed and 
shown in a cedar flat 9 by 13 by 3 inches. 

613 BEGONIA SEMPERFLORENS Cinderella Rose, 
grown from seed and shown in a clay pot. 

614 HANGING BASKET, 12 inches or less with 
foliage plant(s). 

615 BONSAI medium sized, vertical dimension includ- 
ing container over 6 inches, not exceeding 15 
inches. 

616 PLANT(S) FOR TERRACE DECORATION, 
one or more plants growing in an attractive 

(continued next page) 



I 



BUDGET LANDSCAPE-(Continued) 

Members of the Society are welcome to visit the 
site during the week of construction to watch the 
garden grow. The schedule is as follows : Paving 
construction, June 22-23; bed preparation, June 26; 
tree planting, June 27; fence installation, June 28; 
shrub, vine, rose planting, June 29; annuals, bedding 
plants, June 30. 

After June 30, the house and garden will be open 
Sunday - Friday, 12:00-9:00 P.M.; Saturdays 12:00- 
6:00 P.M. 

Center Square Green is located on Daws Road of? 
DeKalb Pike (Route 202) midway between German- 
town Pike (Route 422) and Skippack Pike (Route 73). 



WINTER DAMAGE-(continued) 

carries the life lines of the plant between root and 
leaf? If late summer growth has been excessive, (and 
last summer was moist enough to allow for such 
growth) this important tissue may have been too im- 
mature to withstand severe cold. This may explain 
the severe splitting of bark to the ground line as was 
common in boxwood this spring. 

By now it certainly is evident what is and what is 
not alive. Cut out all dead wood just above the new 
shoots ; give the boxwood some extra attention (feed- 
ing with foliar fertilizer as outlined for holly, above) ; 
remember what it was, but console yourself with what 
it is, and wish a fervent wish that winter 1960-61 will 
still be a record breaker 100 years hence. 



FLOWER SHOW CLASSES-(continued) 

container, suitable for a terrace, not to exceed 3 
feet in any dimension. 

Friday, March 16 
Class 

617 DOUBLE NARCISSUS Inglescombe or Blanche, 
forced and shown in an 8 inch bulb pan. 

618 HYACINTH Queen of the Blues, Perle Brilliant 
or Bismark, forced and shown in an 8 inch bulb 
pan. 

619 HANGING BASKET, 12 inches or less, with 
plant(s) in bloom. 

620 PRIMULA POLYANTHUS yellow, grown from 
seed and shown in eight 3 inch pots placed in a 
cedar flat 9 by 13 by 3 inches. 

621 BONSAI, large plants, over 15 inches. 

622 SUCCULENT GARDEN, collection of succulents 
of one or more species grown in a container for at 
least thirty days prior to show and selected to be 
ecologically compatible for at least three months. 

623 STRAWBERRY JAR, planted at least thirty days 
pri(5r to show with exhibitor's choice of plants 
(of one or more kinds). 



SUMMERTIME GARDEN INFORMATION 
FROM NEW BOOKS 

(available to members by mail from the library) 

Taylor's Encyclopedia of Gardening; Horticulture and 
Landscape Design, 4th ed., edited by Norman 
Taylor. Boston, Houghton Miflflin, Co., 1961. xii, 
1329 p., illus., color. $15.00. 

Given the Massachusetts Horticultural Society 
Golden Medal Award, this semi-technical reference 
book for the gardeners demands a place on all 
bookshelves. 

Growing for Showing by Rudy J. Favretti. Doubleday, 
1961. 142 p., illus., $3.95. 

This handbook is for the amateur gardener and 
contains methods for growing and preparing 
flowers, fruits and vegetables for exhibition. Boys 
and girls involved in 4-H garden projects will 
find many tips to help win blue ribbons. Mr. 
Favretti is Extension Garden Specialist at the 
University of Connecticut. 

The Lawn Book by Robert W. Schery. Macmillan, 
1961. 207 p., illus., $5.95. 

Mr. Schery is director of The Lawn Institute. 
In his book, concisely and expertly written, well 
illustrated and indexed, every home owner will 
find information for lawns in the United States. 

Gardening the Easy Way by Edwin F. Stefifek. Holt, 
Rinehart and Winston, 1961. 198 p., illus., $3.95. 

Especially for the beginning gardener, this book 
gives much helpful information on (see manu- 
script) many phases of gardening. It also con- 
tains a selected reading list. 

Landscape Architecture ; the Shaping of Man's Natural 
Environment by John Ormsbee Simonds. F. W. 
Dodge, 1961. 244 p., illus. $12.75. 

The author has integrated expertly the marginal 
quotations and illustrations into the text in a very 
contemporary manner yet the style was used be- 
fore dictionaries were compiled, thus definitions 
were written in the margins of books. The prob- 
lems of outdoor space is intricately handled from 
a study of microscopic diatoms to planned regions 
such as an 'American neighborhood in the 20th 
century'. The book is as captivating reading to the 
layman as it is useful to the professional. Mr. 
Simonds is currently teaching Landscape Design 
and Urban and Regional Planning at Carnegie 
Institute of Technology and has collaborated on 
many projects, one being the North Triangle 
Redevelopment, Philadelphia. 



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DATES to mark on 
GARDEN CLINICS 

JULY n (Tuesday) 7:00 P.M. Chestnut Hill 

GARDEN TECHNIQUES Ernesta Drinker Ballard 

Staking, disbudding, pinching, soil fumigation 

(sterilization) and other techniques. 

JULY 18 (Tuesday) 10:00 A.M. Ambler 

SOWING seeds' in SUMMER Martha Ludes Garra 
Biennials, perennials (pansies. foxglove, sweet 

William, canterbury bells, candytuft and other plants). 

AUGUSTS (Saturday) 10:00 A. M. Morris Arboretum 
SUMMER CUTTINGS Mrs. Ballard 

Propagation of holly, Taxus, azaleas, camellias, 

evergreen groundcovers, etc. (Members attending may 

bring a flat or purchase one at the clinic, so they can 

take home cuttings.) 

AUGUST 12 (Saturday) 10:00 A.M. Wynnewood 

COPING WITH SUMMER LAWN PROBLEMS Mrs. Ballard 
(This clinic will make use of the test plots of The 

Delaware Valley Turf Grass Association.) 

Register bv using the clip-out coupon below. Send it to 389 
Suburban Station. Philadelphia .?. Registrations will be accepted in 
the order received; confirmation will be made by return post card. 



1 



GARDEN CLINIC 

REGISTRATION 

Please register me for the Garden Clinic (s) 
checked below. ($2.00 per member per Clinic) 

D July 11 GARDEN TECHNIQUES 

n July 18 SOWING SEEDS IN SUMMER 

D August 5 SUMMER CUTTINGS 

n August 12 SUMMER LAWN PROBLEMS 

Name 

Address 

Telephone 

All registrations are confirmed by return mail. 



your CALENDAR 

DATE SET FOR 

GREATER DELAWARE VALLEY 

CHRYSANTHEMUM SHOW 

An all new chrysanthemum show will be created 
this year when The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society 
joins forces with The Men's Chrysanthemum Club of 
Norristown to stage what, it is planned, will become 
a show of new regional importance. The dates are 
Saturday and Sunday, October 28-29, and the place 
is Stewart Armory in Norristown, Pennsylvania. The 
schedule for the new show provides 59 classes for 
amateur chrysanthemum growers. This is a much 
larger number of classes for amateurs than was in- 
cluded in the Society's show at Swarthmore. The pop- 
ular Class 46 has become a part of the new show. 
In the open-to-all section are 99 classes, making a total 
of 159 horticultural classes and ten arrangement 
classes. 

While this new show will occupy the same build- 
ing which has been used by The Men's Chrysanthe- 
mum Club of Norristown for seventeen years, this 
year's event will boast a new look. Plans already are 
underway to find larger quarters for 1962 because of 
the renewed interest and participation which is antici- 
pated. Everyone who has exhibited in the Chrysan- 
themum Shows at Swarthmore in recent years auto- 
matically receives this year's show schedule. Members 
who have not exhibited, but who would like to receive 
a schedule, are asked to write or telephone the Society 
(LO 3-8352). 

Anyone interested in growing chrysanthemums is 
welcome to exhibit in this show; membership in the 
sponsoring organizations is not necessary. 






1617 PENNSYLVANIA BOULEVARD 
PHILADELPHIA 3, PENNSYLVANIA 




VOL. II No. 8 



AUGUST 1961 



ROSES RATE EXTRA CARE IN SUMMER 



The summer care of roses is a subject which is 
often neglected in rose texts. It is true that if correctly 
planted and watered, a rose bush will produce mod- 
erately well in May and June. The proof of the pudding 
as to the competence of the rose gardener is found 
after the initial burst of bloom, when beetles and 
blackspot arrive. In the summer and fall phase of 
rose gardening, techniques are extremely important 
if good bloom is to be maintained. After a reasonably 
normal spring season has passed the initial mass bloom 
is over by June fifteenth. Most Hybrid Teas and 
Floribundas will be quiescent for a week or two after 
this, and the second bloom will begin to appear about 
the Fourth of July. 

Unfortunately, our national holiday also coincides 
with the usual arrival of an army of Japanese beetles. 
Aside from the soil exterminants such as chlordane 
and milky disease spores which kill or attack the 
grub of the beetle in the ground, there are few remedies 
which are even remotely effective. The use of Me- 
thoxychlor or DDT as a spray will give control to a 
degree, but this requires almost daily attention during 
the height of the season. Such contraptions as beetle 
traps often attract more than they kill. Hand picking 
of beetles is a constant exercise, but of little use as a 
protection. There are many other panaceas for this 
insect but none really works well. The beetles will 
not kill the roses, and with patience, we can live 
through the worst of the infestation which is usually 
over by the middle of August. Gardeners who are not 
bothered with Japanese beetles should give great 
thanks, for they are blessed indeed. 

The fungus ills which are apt to beset roses during 
the hot parts of the season are much more serious 
in the long run, and curiously, much more easily 
eradicated. The two most serious of these, blackspot 
and mildew, require rain or overhead watering for 
their dissemination. It is obvious, then, that wetting 
rose leaves under conditions which will not allow 
them to dry rapidly must be avoided. Rain is rarely 
gracious in this respect, and some protection must be 
afforded to obviate this problem. There are several 
materials on the market which will give almost com- 
plete protection front these diseases if used as directed, 
and used consistently. Dusting, while easier, is rarely 



as effective as spraying. It is extremely important 
that fungicides should be applied at least every ten 
days as a prevention, rather than as a cure. The 
determination of the presence of mildew is not diffi- 
cult, it makes its presence known with a whitish 
feltlike mat which appears on new growth. This must 
be effectively soaked with the spray to cure, and 
uninfected leaves must be covered with spray for 
protection. 

Blackspot is a much more serious condition. 
Whereas mildew will rarely kill a plant, blackspot, 
if unchecked, will defoliate bushes in a short time. 
Such a weakened plant will succumb quickly. If it 
should live until fall, the winter will finish it. 

To the initiate, the appearance of any yellowed 
leaves upon a bush requires immediate inspection. 
There are other less serious causes for this but if, 
upon close observation, the yellowing is in the form 
of a ring around fringed black spots, the disease is 
present. This requires immediate attention. If the 
garden is small, a close look at all plants will reveal 
spotted leaves. Remove these at once. If watch is 
kept, it may be possible to isolate the disease and 
control it in this manner. In most cases, spraying 
with a preventive material is the only solution. The 
spray must cover all leaves, all surfaces, and must be 
kept on the foliage. The addition of a spreader-sticker 
material to the spray will make this easier to ac- 
complish. If used consistently every ten days, the 
infection will be eradicated. 

Acti-Dione and Captan, consistently control both 
blackspot and mildew. Both are available in most 
garden supply centers, and are well worth searching 
for if not available at the corner hardware store. 

GENERAL CARE 

To get a maximum late season return from your 
roses, provide a second fertilization about August first, 
and be sure the beds never dry out. This practice 
should induce new growth, beginning about the middle 
of August, and a good mass of flowers during late 
September and early October. Late summer and 
early fall roses are often the most beautiful of the 
entire season. 

(continued next page) 



ROSES RATE EXTRA CARE— (Continued) 

Do not make the mistake of fertilizing a third 
time, because it will stimulate growth late into the 
fall and lower winter resistance. It is easy to become 
over enthusiastic. and feel that a little more fertilizer 
will not hurt and will prolong the season just a trifle. 
Beware! The plants must be hardened off and ready 
to become dormant when frost comes. Late fertiliza- 
tion is the greatest cause of winterkill in this area. 

WATER 

Most important of all, never allow your rose beds 
to even begin to dry out in summer. Lots of water, 
particularly during one of our common August 
droughts, is an absolute necessity. If the plants are 
allowed to dry out, the coming of the autumn rains 
will force late soft growth. The maintenance during 
the summer of sturdy, continuing growth, is a real 
hedge against this sort of soft late wood. Then, when 
autumn comes, the plant will be ready to go into a 
healthy winter dormancy. 



OFFICERS AND EXECUTIVE COUNCIL 



Pennsylvania Horticultural Society 

President 

Vice-Presidents 

Dr. J. Franklin Styer 

Secretary 
Treasurer 
Assistant Treasurer 



Henry D. Mirick 

Mrs. E. Page Allinson 
R. Gwynne Stout 

Miss Estelle Sharp 
John G. Williams 
Carroll R. Wetzel 



Executive Council 



Mrs. E. Page Allinson 

Mrs. Frederic L. Ballard, Jr. 

Charles Becker, Jr. 

Mrs. Henry W. Breyer, Jr. 

VV. Atlee Burpee, Jr. 

Mrs. John B. Carson 

George R. Clark 

Mrs. Edward L. Elliot 

Mrs. Van Horn Ely 

Dr. John M. Fogg, Jr. 

George W. Furness 

Henry D. Mirick 

Frederick W. G. Peck 

J. Liddon Pennock, Jr. 



Mrs. J. Pancoast Reath 
Mrs. Francis H. Scheetz 
Richard H. L. Sexton 
Miss Estelle L. Sharp 
Mrs. Ralph T. Starr 
R. Gwynne Stout 
Dr. J. Franklin Styer 
Richard Thomson 
Joseph B. Townsend, Jr. 
William H. Weber 
Carroll R. Wetzel 
John G. Williams 
Mrs. Harry Wood 
Mrs. Richard D. Wood, Jr. 



REVIEWS OF NEW BOOKS 

(available to members by mail from the library) 

American Rose Annual 1961. The American Rose 
Society, Columbus, Ohio, 1%!. 243 pp., illus. 

Carlton B. Lees, landscape designer and direc- 
tor of the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society has 
written an article for this year's annual called 
"Roses in the Complete Garden". His excellent 
illustrations with lengthy descriptions show roses 
integrating with the contemporary outdoor plan. 
A clever article about "The Yellow Rose of Texas" 
as well as pertinent information — rose ratings, 
patents, and rose cultivar names — are included 
in the annual. 

Carnations; A Manual of the Culture, Insects and 
Diseases and Economics of Carnations by Arthur 
Bing and others. Prepared for the Regional Flori- 
cultural School (New York), 1961. 197 pp., paper 
covers. $1.25. 

Compiled for the commercial florist. 

Florida's Beautiful Crotons by Dr. B. Frank Brown. 
American Codiaeum Society, Florida, Undersea 
Press, 1960. 143 pp., illus. $5.95. 

Horticultural history, culture, uses and hints 
are discussed as well as the many illustrations of 
leaf variations of the plant Codiaeum variegatum. 
The Dreer Company in 1871 first offered these 
exotic foliaged plants to the American nursery 
trade in Philadelphia. 

Orchids, Their Botany and Culture by Alex D. 
Hawkes, forward bv John W. Blowers. Harpers, 
1961. 297 pp., illus' $6.95. 

This is a good elementary manual for every- 
one interested in orchids. One of the systems of 
orchid classification is given for genera with their 
authorities. Topic headings are culture, principle 
cultivated orchids, and hybridization. Authorities 
are not given for species names. The fine photo- 
graphs and line drawings are well documented. 

Weed Identification and Control ; In the North Central 
States, 2d ed., by Duane Isely. Iowa University 
Press, 1%0. 400 pp., illus. $4.95. 

The dual function of this book provided in one 
volume is clearly presented in a non-technical 
form. It includes 299 full-page illustrations of 
weed species and a special section on "Identifica- 
tion of Weeds from Flowers and Leaves". A 
bibliogjaphy for further reference is also included. 

Are You Your Garden's Worst Pest? by Cynthia 

Westcott. Doubleday, 1961. 305 pp., illus. $4.50. 

"There's no need for you to be if you read 

this book." "Think" is the title of Dr. Westcott's 

(continued next page) 



I 



first chapter. While smoking a cigarette and 
transplanting tomatoes or other solanaceous plants 
you are spreading the virus of tobacco mosaic. 
Helpful and harmful insects, sprays, an excellent 
list of garden plants and their optimum pH range, 
garden pesticides and plant quarantines are just 
some of the many vital areas covered. 

Healthy Vegetables; A Guide to Feeding and Pest 
Control by W. O. Snow. London, Land Books, 
Ltd., (distributed by Sportshelf), 1960. 128 pp., 
illus. $4.50. 

One of the joys of gardening includes informa- 
tion not always gotten from personal experience — 
particularly when it's from plant pests and diseases 
or lack of adequate soil nutrition — but from 
reading and seeing illustrations about these such 
as in Mr. Snow's guide book. The author writes: 
"This is a book for the amateur gardener who 
likes to grow-and-eat-good vegetables". 

Window-Box Gardening; An Illustrated Guide for the 
Outdoor Culture of Plants in Boxes, Tubs and 
Hanging Baskets by Henry Teuscher. Macmillan 
Co., 1956. xi - 180 pp., illus. $3.95. 

Over a ten year period the author, who is 
curator of the Montreal Botanical Garden, has 
carried out studies with the help of 'window-box' 
gardeners in this modern city. These results are 
brought together in book form and now for the 
first time one no longer has to rely on short articles 
or chapters scattered throughout the literature. 
Part I contains information on construction, se- 
lection of materials, the drip-proof self-watering 
window box, care during the growing season, 
and raising plants from seeds and cuttings. Part 
n discusses window boxes through the seasons, 
vases, tubs and hanging baskets. Part HI describes 
and discusses in alphabetical order suitable plants. 
The book is well illustrated with photographs and 
step-by-step figures. 

Bonsai, Japanese Miniature Trees; Their Style, Culti- 
vation and Training by Kan Yashiroda. Newton, 
Mass., Branford Co., 1960. 166pp., illus. $5.75 
Another addition to the Society's collection of 
books on bonsai is this well illustrated volume 
with 118 photographs and 16 line drawings. Mr. 
Yashiroda, a Japanese expert in this field, also 
covers the history and classification of bonsai and 
includes a small but helpful bibliography. 

A Joy of Gardening by V. Sackville-West. Dolphin 
Books, 1961. 199pp., paper covers. $.95. 

Herbs and the Earth by Henry Beston. Dolphin Books, 
1%1. 199 pp., illus., paper covers. $.95. 

Arizona Flora, 2d. ed. by Kearney and Peebles with 
supplement by John Thomas Howell and others. 
University of California Press, 1960. 1085 pp., illus. 



$12.50. 

An excellent addition to the library collection 
of floras. 

Geographical Guide to Floras of the World. Pt. II. 

by Sidney F. Blake. Washington, D. C, U.S.D.A. 
Misc. Publ No. 797, 1961. 742 pp. $2.75. 

"An annotated list with special reference to 
useful plant names — Western Europe: Finland, 
Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Iceland, Great Brit- 
ain with Ireland, Netherlands, Belgium, Luxem- 
bourg, France, Spain, Portugal, Andorra, Monaco, 
Italy, San Marino, and Switzerland." One of the 
last and fine contributions to botany by the late 
Dr. Blake is this carefully compiled work. 

Plant Patents; Common Introductory Names. 

American Association of Nurserymen, Washing-' 
ton, D. C, 1957-1961. 

Presented in tabular form are the chronological 
and numerical patent listings with the name of 
originator or discoverer, the person or company 
to which the patent has been assigned and the 
common names (which are also indexed). 

Walks and Paths-Driveways Steps, Curbs, and Edgings 
by Reginald R. Hawkins and Charles H. Abbe. 
Van Nostrand Co., 1951. v - 164 pp., illus. $2.50. 
Outdoor construction information is given for 
the modern home owner. This is the first volume 
of The Home Mechanic's Outdoor Library. 

Garden Pool-Fountains Swimming Pools-Sprinkling 
Systems Recreation Areas by Reginald R. Haw- 
kins and Charles H. Abbe. Van Nostrand Co., 
1951. vi-139 pp., illus. $2.50. 

Water — this semi-technical manual tells how 
to do complete projects for your enjoyment of 
water. This is also a volume of The Home Mechan- 
ic's Outdoor Library. 

Holiday and Party Table Settings by Zelda Wyatt 
Schulke. Hearthside Press, Inc., 1960. 121 pp., 
illus. $4.50. 

With a bit of theory, materials and the finished 
arrangements, supplemented by etiquette, the 
author provides basic information for numerous 
entertainment occasions. 

Hanging Flower and Plant Decorations by Zelda 
Wyatt Schulke. Hearthside Press, Inc., 1958. 
125 pp., illus. $3.95. 

Simplicity and elegance in design are found by 
the author for enhancing doorways and porches, 
interior high levels, kitchens and dining rooms, 
and wall plaques. Also the use of driftwood, 
wreaths, mobiles and pots of plant materials com- 
prise a wealth of ideas presented in this book 
on decoration. 

(continued next page) 



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REVIEWS OF NEW BOOKS 

(continued) 

Readings in the History of American Agriculture 
edited by Wayne D. Rasmussen. University of 
Illinois Press, 1960. 340 pp.. illus. $6.50. 

This book covers the development of agriculture 
in this country from 1607, when the practices 
much used were little advanced from the Middle 
Ages, through the second Agricultural Revolution 
beginning with World War II and the World Food 
Board in 1946. A chronology begins with 1493 
when Columbus "introduced barley, grapes, sugar 
cane, wheat and horses into the New World" 
and ends with 1958 when a new wilt-resistant 
tomato, Pink Shipper, became available. The book 
is authoritatively written and is highly instructive. 



BUDGET LANDSCAPE EXHIBIT 

Have you seen the Pennsylvania Horti- 
cultural Society's demonstration of home 
landscaping at Center Square Green? It is 
open Sunday - Friday, 12:00 - 9:00 P.M.; 
Saturdays 12:00 - 6:00 P.M. Displayed infor- 
mation in the garage shows how this garden 
was developed and how it could be put to- 
gether over a four year period. 

Center Square Green is located on Daws 
Road off DeKalb Pike (Route 202) midway 
between Germantown Pike and Skippack Pike 
(Route 73). 



RECENT GIFTS 

The garden book collection of the late Mrs. 
Alan Reed has been given to the library and the 
following are new additions to the Society's 
collection : The Joy of the Ground by Marion 
Cran, 1929; A Natural History of New York City 
by John Kieran, 1959; Big Crops from Little Gar- 
dens by A. B. Ross, 1925 ; and Beautiful Flowers 
and How to Grow Them by Horace J. and Walter 
P. Wright, 1926. 

Garden Clinic Date to Mark on Your Calendar 

AUGUST 12 (Saturday) 10:00 A.M. Wynnewood 

COPING WITH SUMMER LAWN PROBLEMS Mrs. Ballard 

(This clinic will make use of the test plots of The 
Delaware Valley Turf Grass Association.) 



Register by using the clip-out coupon below. Send it to 389 
Suburban Station. Philadelphia .?. Registrations will be accepted in 
the order received: confirmation will be made by return post card. 



GARDEN CLINIC 
REGISTRATION 

Please register me for the Garden Clinic 
($2.00 per member). 

D August 12 SUMMER LAWN PROBLEMS 

Name _ 

Address 

Telephone 

All registrations are confirmed by return mail. 



THE PENNSYLVANIA 
HORTICULTURAL 



SOCIE 



1617 PENNSYLVANIA BOULEVARD 
PHILADELPHIA 3. PENNSYLVANIA 



^SSi7 




MAI>C»' 



VOL II No. 9 



SEPTEMBER 1961 



FIRST FALL GARDEN DAY SLATED 

Six informative topics will be presented by six 
informed members of The Pennsylvania Horticultural 
Society in a special all day program, Saturday, Sep- 
tember 23, 10:00 A.M. -4:30 P.M., at the Ambler 
campus of Temple University. Many of the talks will 
be illustrated, and luncheon will be served to all 
registered. 

The six informative subjects include: "Garden 
Backbones" by Frederick W. G. Peck in which the 
importance of the structural elements of the garden 
(architectural and plant structures such as hedges 
will be emphasized) ; "Rx for an Interesting Autumn 
Garden" by Lois Paul (Mrs. J. Folsom Paul), at a 
time of the year when you can do something about 
improving your fall garden and "Vines Are Important, 
Too!" by Miss Mary O. Milton, which will include 
information about many vines and espaliered plants, 
a much unutilized group of valuable garden subjects. 
After luncheon Ernesta Drinker Ballard (Mrs. Fred- 
eric L. Ballard, Jr.), will ask "Do You Really Want 
a Greenhouse?" She will answer this question and 
many more, too, for greenhouse owners, potential 
greenhouse owners and greenhouse dreamers. Since 
October is the best possible time to do something 
about spring bulb beauty, Gertrude Smith Wister 
(Mrs. John C. Wister), will give all attending a good 
start with "Daffodils and Their Companions". Richard 
Thomson, who started to say "A rose is ... " has 
decided that roses are so much that it is not possible 
to describe them adequately, so he has selected the 
simple but promising title, "A Rose". 

Student exhibits and the gardens and green- 
houses of the Ambler Campus will be open to all 
attending Garden Day. 

Registration for Garden Day (including lunch- 
eon) : $4.00 for members of The Pennsylvania Horti- 
cultural Society ; $5.00 for all others. Write or 
telephone the Society (LO 3-8352) to receive a regis- 
tration blank and complete program of the event. 
Due to limited facilities, registrations will be accepted 
and confirmed in the order received. Registrations 
will close on Wednesday, September 20. 

Martha L. Garra (Mrs. Edward J. Garra), is the 



chairman of the Garden Day program. She will intro- 
duce Henry D. Mirick, who will greet all attending, 
promptly at 10:00 A. M. All talks are limited to pre- 
cisely forty minutes each and the program is planned 
to adhere to its schedule, closing promptly at 4:30 P.M. 



MEMBERS INVITED TO SHOW PAINTINGS 

Members of The Pennsylvania Horticultural 
Society who are painters will have the opportunity 
to display their works in a special exhibit, PAINT- 
INGS FROM PLANTS AND GARDENS, November 
15 to 30 in the rooms of the Society, 389 Suburban 
Station Building. All works must have been moti- 
vated or inspired by plant materials : flowers, trees, 
ferns, fruits, vegetables, gardens, etc. 

A special entry blank will be included in next 
month's NEWS which will give you full details. The 
deadline for entries is October 30. 



ROVING ANSWERING SERVICE SUPPLIED 

The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society will 
supply a Roving Answering Service to the Chelten- 
ham Flower Show, Saturday and Sunday, September 
30 and October 1, in the Curtis Arboretum, Wyncote, 
Pennsylvania. Suitably identified, a staff of profes- 
sional and advanced amateur gardeners and horti- 
culturists will supply horticultural information for 
visitors to the show. 

In addition, the Society will present an outdoor 
exhibit of broad-leaf evergreens. Common and accu- 
rate botanical names, as well as pertinent horticul- 
tural information will be presented with each plant. 

This indoor-outdoor show is in its third year. 
Curtis Hall, once the music room of the Curtis 
Mansion, and two tents will house arrangements, 
orchids and a wide variety of horticultural specimens; 
outdoor exhibits also will be featured. 

Show hours are Saturday, 1:00-10:00 P.M.; 
Sunday, 10:00 A. M. - 7:00 P. M. Anyone wishing to 
enter the show may do so. Schedules may be obtained 
by telephoning (LO 3-8352) or writing the Horticul- 
tural Society. 




SCENES FROM THE HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

The front yard was designed entirely from an 
inside-out viewpoint, with major concern for the 
family within the property rather than just a super- 
ficial picture of the house from the street. Yet, as 
the photographs indicate, the house is more attractive 
and more inviting when approached from the street 
as a result of this planning. The fence provides a 
degree of separation from the completely public street 
and the generous brick paving, shade providing oak 
and colorful annuals provide a friendly greeting to 
all visitors. 

At the rear of the house, a twenty by twenty foot 
floor of brick (on sand) and an L-shaped planting bed 
and fence provide the basic structure for the outdoor 
living space. Handy to the kitchen and garage, it 
is on the northeast side of the house, so the building 
itself provides protection from afternoon and evening 
sun. The flowering crab apples will soon grow to 
form a cooling canopy over this space which is well 
suited for outdoor dining, relaxing and entertaining. 
The garage has been converted into an exhibit room 
explaining the design of the property and suggesting 
how such a scheme could be carried out over a four- 
year period. 

Using do-it-yourself methods and economical 
materials and methods — such as brick on sand, and 
ready-made fence sections, practically any home- 
owner could create a similar garden. Even modest- 
sized shade trees, if purchased the first year, would 
begin to provide cooling shade in four or five years. 
Flowering crab apples (Mains floribunda and Mains 
'Hopa') were used not only because they are relatively 
inexpensive as compared to some other trees, but 
they are moderately fast growing, yet can be con- 



L i 



This house in the 
Center Square Green 
development of Alt- 
man Builders & De- 
velopers underwent a 
significant change in 
appearance in late 
June when it acquired 
a garden within one 
week. This is a' part 
of The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society's program 
to demonstrate how a planned landscape can provide 
a comfortable, useful and attractive environment in 
which to live. It goes much beyond ordinary "founda- 
tion planting" which contributes xery little to creating 
garden-like spaces. 






CAPING DEMONSTRATION 

trolled with ease to keep them from becoming overly 
large in the future. 

While the various elements of the design (trees, 
fence, convex leaf hollies, groundcovers) are simplified 
and few, the scheme allows space for growing a variety 
of colorful plants. For example, rock plants were 
planted in the low retaining wall; the Delaware Valley 
Iris Society is providing iris rhizomes (in August) 
and the American Daffodil Society is providing daffodil 
bulbs of several varieties. 




From the garage roof the simplified overall shape 
of the rear garden floor is evident. The tree in the 
square is the same as that in the center of the photo- 
graph on the left. A small vegetable garden and a 
row of blueberries will eventually provide protection 
from the next door property and create a vista to the 
northwest. Cotoneasters and viburnums, along with 
vines on the fence, will create a greater degree of 
privacy without the imprisonment which might occur 
if a solid fence or hedge were used. 

Center Square Green is located on Daws Road 
off DeKalb Pike (Route 202) midway between Ger- 
mantown Pike and Skippack Pike (Route 7Z). 




LANDSCAPE DAYS SET 

Three Sunday afternoons (September 10, October 
15 and November 5) have been scheduled to feature 
The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society's demonstra- 
tion Budget Landscape at Center Square Green. 
From 2 :00 to 5 :00 P. M. on each of these days, Carlton 
B. Lees, Director of the Society, will be on hand to 
answer questions and to explain the development of 
the garden. 



Plan Your Fall Plantings Now 

You can order your seeds and bulbs by using 
the collection of available catalogs in the Society's 
library. 



SEPT. GARDEN VISITS FEATURE ANNUALS 

The color and abundance of annuals will high- 
light the early fall Garden Visits of The Pennsylvania 
Horticultural Society, 2:00-6:00 P.M., Sunday, Sep- 
tember 17 in Penllyn area of suburban Philadelphia. 
For detailed route instructions, check your Garden 
Visits route folder which you received with last 
April's NEWS. 

SUNDAY, September 17 

Mr. and Mrs. E. George Lavino, (Penllyn). A 
Georgian house, formal garden and beautiful pool, 
adjacent summer dining space incorporated in the 
ruins of an old barn, provide unusual interest to this 
country place. 

Mr. and Mrs. George V, Strong, (Penllyn). Roses 
and annuals in variety are the highlights of this 
informal garden in a natural rural setting. 

Mr. and Mrs. R. Sturgis Ingersoll, "Forest Hill 
Lodge", (Penllyn). A stucco and stone wall enclose 
a garden used as a background for outstanding pieces 
of sculpture. 

Miss Anna Ingersoll, "Forest Hill", (Penllyn). 
The sweeping lawns are well planted and the enclosed 
garden is not only charming but is an example of 
perfection. 



BUS RESERVATION 

GARDEN VISITS 

Sunday, September 17, 1961 

Application with payment ($1.50) must 
reach The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society, 
389 Suburban Station Building, Philadelphia 
3, at least one week before date of event. 



Name 

Address 



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DATES To Mark On Your CALENDAR 

SEPTEMBER 10 (Sunday) BUDGET LANDSCAPE DAY 

2:00-5:00 P.M. Center Square Green 



SEPTEMBER 17 (Sunday) GARDEN VISITS 

2:00-6:00 P.M. 



Penllyn 



SEPTEMBER 23 (Saturday) GARDEN DAY (Registration 
necessary) 
10:00 A.M. -4:30 P.M. 

Ambler Campus of Temple University 

SEPTEMBER 30 -OCTOBER 1 (Saturday and Sunday) 

CHELTENHAM FLOWER SHOW Wyncote 

Saturday 1:00-10:00 P.M. 
Sunday 10:00 A. M. - 7:00 P. M. 

OCTOBER 15 (Sunday) BUDGET LANDSCAPE DAY 

2:00-5:00 P.M. Center Square Green 

OCTOBER 28-29 (Saturday and Sunday) 

GREATER DELAWARE VALLEY CHRYSANTHEMUM SHOW 

Stewart Armory, Norristown 
Saturday 4:00-10:00 P.M. 
Sunday 12:00-5:00 P.M. 

NOVEMBER 5 (Sunday) BUDGET LANDSCAPE DAY 

2 :00 - 5.00 P. M. Center Square Green 

NOVEMBER 15 (Wednesday) 

ANNUAL MEETING OF THE SOCIETY 

389 Suburban Station Building 

NOVEMBER 15-30 PAINTINGS FROM PLANTS AND GARDENS 

9:30 A.M. -5.00 P. AI. daily 
389 Suburban Station Building 



CHRYSANTHEMUM SHOW SCHEDULES 
AVAILABLE 

Schedules for The Greater Delaware Valley 
Chrysanthemum Show, October 28-29 are being sent 
to exhibitors from previous Chrysanthemum Shows. 
The schedules are also available to anyone else 
interested in exhibiting. Write or telephone the 
Society (LO 3-8352) for your copy. 

This year's show is being sponsored cooperatively 
with the Men's Chrysanthemum Club of Norristown 
and will be staged in the Stewart Armory, Norris- 
town. The schedule contains 41 classes for hardy 
garden chrysanthemums and 18 classes of pompon 
and commercial types which are open to amateurs 
only. The open-to-all classes total 99. 

Providing challenges for arrangers are such 
classes as Autumn in the Orient, October Skies, Win- 
ter Comes and others, making a total of ten arrange- i 
ment classes. j 

Nathan Wolf, Jr., of North W'ales, is chairman j 
of the show. Mrs. Theodore R. Streeper is chairman 
of the arrangement section. 

Anyone interested in growing and showing 
chrysanthemums is welcome to exhibit. Membership 
in the sponsoring organizations is not necessary. 



THE PENNSYLVANIA 



HORTICULTURAL 



SOCIE^ 



1617 PENNSYLVANIA BOULEVARD 
PHILADELPHIA 3, PENNSYLVANIA 



b 




VOL II No. 10 



OCTOBER 1961 



EVERGREENS THE EASY WAY 

Evergreens the Easy Way is the title of the 
exhibit sponsored by the Pennsylvania Horticultural 
Society which will be staged outdoors at the Chelten- 
ham Flower Show, Curtis Arboretum, Wyncote, Sep- 
tember 30 -October 1. Plants to be exhibited have 
been selected for their year 'round and dependable 
good' looks, hardiness, comparative ease of culture and 
also for the fact that they can be controlled with a 
moderate amount of maintenance. 



Evergreens selected include Glossy Abelia {Abelia 
grandijlora) ,3. compact form of Wintergreen Barberry 
(Berberis julianae). Warty Barberry (B. verruculosa) , 
Common Box { Buxus sempervirens) , Dwarf Hinoki 
Cypress {Chamaecyparis obtusa gracilis), Rock Spray 
{Cotoneaster horizontalis) , Willowleaf Cotoneaster (C. 
salicifolia), Evergreen Bittersweet {Euonymus fortunei 
vegetus). Convex-leaf Japanese Holly (Ilex crenata 
convexa), Heller Japanese Holly (/. crenata helleri), 
Littleleaf Japanese Holly (7. crenata microphylla) , 
Mountain Laurel {Kalmia latifolia). Drooping Leu- 
cothoe (L. catesbaei), Oregon Holly-grape {Mahonia 
aquijolium), Japanese Pieris (P. japonica), Carolina 
Rhododendron (/?. carolinianum) , Catawba Rhoden- 
dron Hybrid 'Roseum Elegans', Spreading English 
Yew (Taxus baccata repandens), Dwarf Japanese Yew 
{T. cuspidata nana), a dense form of Dwarf Yew 
(T. cuspidata densa), and Leather leaf Viburnum 
{V. rhytidophyllum) . 

Several of the plants in this list are quite common ; 
this, however, doesn't alter their position as good 
landscape plants. All will be fully labeled in the 
exhibit, including reasons why they appear in this 
group. Bloodgood Nurseries, of Spi-inghouse, is co- 
operating with the Society in staging the exhibit. 

The Cheltenham Flower Show opens at 1 :00 P.M. 
Saturday, September 30. Show hours are: 1:00- 10:00 
P.M. on Saturday, 10:00 A.M. -7:00 P.M. on Sunday. 
The Curtis Arboretum is on Church Road, east of 
Greenwod Avenue, Wyncote. 



RULES ANNOUNCED FOR 
PAINTING EXHIBIT 

Rules for the special showing of paintings from 
plants and gardens which is scheduled to open in 
the rooms of the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society 
on November 15, have been announced by Mrs. James 
Hornor, Chairman of the exhibit. 

The opening coincides with the 135th Annual 
Meeting of the Society, and the paintings will be on 
exhibit until December 1. 

Mrs. Hornor explained that while all works must 
have been inspired by subject matter related to plants 
and gardens, paintings may vary from representational 
to abstract, provided the artist found his or her motiva- 
tion in the plant world as known and appreciated by 
gardeners. 

A special insert in this copy of the NEWS carries 
entry blanks for your convenience. Space is limited, 
so be sure to get your entry in early. 

RULES 

1. All paintings must be the original work of members of 
the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society and must have 
been inspired by plant material (flowers, ferns, trees, gar- 
dens, fruit, vegetables, etc.). 

2. No more than three paintings may be entered by each 
member. 

3. The largest dimension of each painting, including frame, 
is not to exceed 40 inches. 

4. Each painting must be clearly labeled on the back with 
the following: 

full name of member-painter 
complete mailing address 
telephone number 
title of painting 

price or evaluation, if not for sale 
(if not for sale mark N.F.S.) 

5. All paintings must be framed, wired and ready to hang. 

6. Entry blank must reach the Horticultural Society office 
by October 30. (See insert). 

7. Paintings will be received 9 A.M. - 5 P.M. 
October 30 - November 3. 

8. Paintings may be picked up on December 1 and must be 
picked up before December S. 

9. The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society will withhold 10% 
of the sale price of any painting sold while on display. 
All checks are to be made payable to the Society. 



SPECIAL CLASSES INCLUDED 
IN CHRYSANTHEMUM SHOW SCHEDULE 

Several special classes for specimens are included 
in the schedule of the Greater Delaware Valley Chry- 
santhemum Show which will take place October 28-29 
in the Stewart Armory, Harding Blvd., Norristown. 
Besides the popular Class 46 which long has been a 
part of the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society's 
shows, there are many special classes which have been 
a part of those of the Men's Chrysanthemum Club of 
Norristown, with whom this show is being coopera- 
tively sponsored. The J. A. Morrison class, for in- 
stance, calls for two sprays each of twelve varieties 
of garden chrysanthemums. The Nathan H. Wolf 
class calls for a vase of ten blooms one or more 
colors or varieties Commercial and/or Spoon and/or 
Spider chrysanthemums. In both the Amateur and 
the Open sections of the show schedule, classes are 
provided for seedlings to be shown by or for the 
originator under his name and/or number. 

The Amateur Section contains 60 specimen 
classes ; the Open to All Section, 99 classes. 

ARRANGEMENT CLASSES 

Ten arrangement classes in the show schedule 
offer a variety of challenges to flower arrangers : 
Gracious Living, an arrangement of chrysanthemums 
in a footed container; Autumn Sunset, an arrangement 
in tints, tones and/or shades of orange and red ; 
October Skies, to suggest motion in space ; Autumn 
in the Orient, chrysanthemums arranged in the 
Oriental manner and featuring a visual expanse of 
water; Day's End, an arrangement of pastel chrysan- 
themums ; Winter Comes, dried plant material with an 
accent of white chrysanthemums ; Last of the 'Mums, 
a line arrangement suggesting simplicity ; and two 
classes for young adults : Our Garden Friends (animal 
or bird forms made of plant material for pre-teens) 
and Summer Rememberance, a small arrangement in 
an unusual container (for teenagers). Mrs. Theodore 
R. Streeper of Norristown is Chairman of the Ar- 
rangements Section and is assisted by Mrs. Leroy F. 
Carn. Nathan H. Wolf, Jr., is Show Chairman and 
William F. Russell is President of the Men's 
Chrysanthemum Club. 

TICKETS 

Three tickets are included in a special insert 
sheet in this issue of the NEWS. Please use them 
to help us keep a record of the members attending 
the Show. 

Schedules are available to anyone interested in 
exhibiting in this show and may be obtained by 
writing or telephoning the Society (LO 3-8352). 



FROM THE LIBRARY: 
BOOKS, MAGAZINES AND CATALOGS 

The library is the backbone of our Society be- 
cause it contains an outstanding collection of books, 
magazines, journals and other references in the many 
phases of horticulture. Are you aware of the con- 
venient lending service available to you as a member? 
Books may be requested by post card or telephone 
and will be mailed to you promptly. New books are 
regularly reviewed in the NEWS. A current list of 
basic landscaping books has been compiled in con- 
junction with the Society's Landscape Demonstration 
at Center Square Green and is available to you upon 
request. 



REVIEWS OF NEW BOOKS 

Check lists for ornamental plants of subtropical 
regions; a handbook for reference, 2d ed., com- 
piled by Roland Stewart Hoyt. San Diego, Liv- 
ingston Press, 1958. x-485 pp., illus. $8.00. 

This book covers an "arbitary area south of a 
line drawn through Charleston, Gainsville, Baton 
Rouge, San Antonio, El Paso, Phoenix and San 
Francisco". The approach of the author is to 
examine first the ecological conditions, then, with 
his long experience with plants as a landscape 
architect, he decides what plants would adapt 
to particular environments. A valuable book for 
all interested in growing exotic plants. 

Plant pruning in pictures; how, when, and where to 
pnuie, and with what tools by Montague Free. 
Doubleday, 1961. 286 pp., illus. $4.95. 

"This book is intended to be a companion 
volume to Plant Propagation in Pictures and 
likewise is primarily for the amateur." Subjects 
covered are : trees, shrubs, evergreens, topiary, 
espaliers, arbors, annuals, perennials, vines, fruits, 
herbs, house plants, bonsai, kitchen gardens, 
grafted plants and transplanting. This is a very 
helpful book for all aspects of gardening and is 
enhanced by the numerous photographs. The 
author is the well known expert in this field and 
for over 30 years he was Head Gardener at the 
Brooklyn Botanic Garden. 

Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew; past and present by 

William B. Turrill. London, Herbert Jenkins, 
1959. 256 pp., fold, map, 16 pis. 25 shillings. 
(Gift of Mrs. Webster Barnes.) 

Botanical gardens are always exciting and who 
doesn't want to read more about Kew, the most 
famous gardens in the world. From its earliest 
beginnings prior to 1759, Dr. Turrill, who has 
been a Kewite for 50 years, describes the gardens, 
their purpose and work up to 1958. Times of col- 
lecting are changing; once the heavy Wardian 



From The Library: Books, Magazines and Catalogs 

cases were used for transport of living plant 
materials. Now it's peat-moss and polyethylene. 
The book is filled with factual botanical informa- 
tion. 



Japanese botany during the period of wood block 
printing bv H. H. Bartlett and H. Shohara. Asa 
Gray BulL n.s 3(3-4) : 291-561. 1961. $2.50. 

Part I is an essay on the development of botany 
in Japan and "provides a background for the 
better understanding of Part II, which is an 
elaborately annotated catalogue of the items ex- 
hibited at the Clements Library" of the Univer- 
sity of Michigan. This is the collection of books 
and manuscripts of the late Professor Bartlett. 

United States Department of Agriculture. The year- 
book of agriculture 1961, seeds. Government 
Printing Office, 1961. xiv - 591 pp., illus. $2.00. 
(Gift of Congressman James A. Byrne.) 

Appropriately timed is the publication of the 
1961 Yearbook as it coincides with World Seed 
Year, designated by the Food and Agriculture 
Organization of the United Nations in an inter- 
national campaign against hunger. Such pioneers 
as John Chapman, Wendelin Grimm and Gregor 
Mendel (apple, alfalfa and pea seeds respectively) 
are included in the book. Subject breakdown for 
individual articles are: importance, life processes, 
production, processing, certification, testing and 
marketing of seeds plus a selected list of publica- 
tions and seed characteristics. 



GARDEN APPEARS IN 
NATIONAL MAGAZINE 

The story of The Pennsylvania Horti- 
cultural Society's Budget Landscape demon- 
stration at Center Square Green appears in 
the September 1961 issue of HOUSE & 
HOME magazine, a publication of Time, 
Life, Inc. The house, called "The President" 
by Altman Builders and Developers, recently 
received THE AMERICAN HOME maga- 
zine's Best House For the Money award for 
the state of Pennsylvania. 

Center Square Green is located on Daws 
Rd. off DeKalb Pike (Rt. 202) midway be- 
tween Germantown Pike and Skippack Pike 
(Rt. 73). 



DOUBLE, DOUBLE . . . 

Did you ever think what a nice thing it would 
be if each member of the Pennsylvania Horticultural 
Society managed to get just one more person to join? 
It would double our membership! And it would be 
a great pleasure to bring the program of the Society 
to twice as many members as we now have. The 
increased membership would allow an even greater 
expansion of our activities; it would mean that plans 
for the future would become reality that much more 
quickly. 

What do plans for the future include? The list 
is a long one, but these are some: permanent quarters 
for the Society; small greenhouses in which we can 
demonstrate what any green-thumber can do with 
a limited budget and intelligent management; a gar- 
den not only for our own use but to attract public 
attention to the Society and show the world how well 
we garden in the Greater Delaware Valley ; an exhi- 
bition room in which a constant parade of informative 
and attractive displays can be staged ; more space 
and quiet privacy for the users of the library (and 
there are many); increased informational services; 
centrally located meeting facilities for horticultural- 
gardening groups, and many other plans which will 
carry our Society forward into the future. We have 
inherited a tradition of great gardening; we have only 
to carry it forward to make ours the most vital of 
horticultural societies. 

I am sure that among your many friends there 
are many who would not only benefit by Horticultural 
Society membership but would enjoy being a part of 
this forward moving organization. Can't you persuade 
at least one of them to join? We will help you if 
you will give us their name and mailing address on 
the coupon attached below. Won't you be a friend 
to a friend . . . tell them about our Society. If they 
own a tree, they should belong . . . 

H. D. Mirick, 
President 



(clip and mail to 389 Suburban Station Building, Philadelphia 3 Pa.) 

I am a member of The Pennsylvania Horticultural 
Society and would like to recommend that 

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City & State - - 

become a member. I will tell him her them 

to expect to hear from you in the very near future. 

Thank you, 

(Signed) „ 



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DATES To Mark On Your CALENDAR 

SEPTEMBER 30 -OCTOBER 1 (Saturday and Sunday) 

CHELTNEHAM FLOWER SHOW Wyncote 

Saturday 1:00-10:00 P.M. 
Sunday 10:00 A.M. -7 m P.M. 

OCTOBER 15 (Sunday) BUDGET LANDSCAPE DAY 

2:00-5:00 P.M. Center Square Green 

OCTOBER 28-29 (Saturday and Sunday) 

GREATER DELAWARE VALLEY CHRYSANTHEMUM SHOW 

Stewart Armory, Norristown 
Saturday 4:00-10:00 P.M. 
Sunday 12:c$-5:00 P.M. 

NOVEMBER 5 (Sunday) BUDGET LANDSCAPE DAY 

2 :00 - 5 :00 P. M. Center Square Green 

NOVEMBER 15 (Wednesday) 2:30 P.M. 

ANNUAL MEETING OF THE SOCIETY 

389 Suburban Station Building 

NOVEMBER 15-30 PAINTINGS FROM PLANTS AND GARDENS 

9:30 A.M. -5:00 P.M. daily 
389 Suburban Station Building 

DECEMBER 4 8 CHRISTMAS SHOW 

9:30 A.M. -5:00 P.M. 
389 Suburban Station Building 



CHRISTMAS SHOW ANNOUNCED 

The 1961 Christmas Show of The Pennsylvania 
Horticultural Society will take place in the rooms of 
the Society, 389 Suburban Station Bldg., on December 
4 to 8. Mrs. W. C. Hogg, Jr., is Chairman of this 
year's show and is assisted by the members of the 
Junior Providence Garden Club of which she is a 
member. 

A complete schedule of classes will appear in the 
November issue of the NEWS. 



HELP WANTED . . . 

We are in desperate need of help ! The Penn- 
sylvania Horticultural Society is embarking on an 
intensive membership drive and we have thousands 
of envelopes to address. If you can give a helping 
(writing) hand for an hour, for a day or for several 
days, please telephone Mrs. Taggart, Membership 
Secretary (LO 3-8352) and let her know when you 
can come in to address and stuf? envelopes. Days 
scheduled are Tuesdays and Thursdays during the 
month of October in the Board Room, 389 Suburban 
Station Building. If you wish to bring your lunch, 
we'll provide coffee or tea. (If you can't come to 
address envelopes, you can also help by convincing a 
friend to join the Society.) 



TELL YOUR FRIENDS 

ABOUT 

THE PENNSYLVANIA 

HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 



THE PENNSYLVANIA 
HORTICUL'k URAL 



SOCIETY 



1617 PENNSYLVANIA BOULEVARD 
PHILADELPHIA 3. PENNSYLVANIA 



^?»? 




VOL II No. 1 1 



NOVEMBER 1961 



SPECIAL EVENINGS FOR MEMBERS 



SPECIAL FILM AT ANNUAL MEETING 



A series of informal evenings for members will 
be inaugurated on Tuesday evening, November 7, at 
7:30 P.M., in the rooms of The Pennsylvania Horti- 
cultural Society, 389 Suburban Station Building. 
Carlton B. Lees, Director of the Society, will lead a 
discussion on garden and plant photography. He will 
be assisted by Richard B. Chillas, Jr. Each member 
attending is asked to bring five of his best garden 
and/or plant slides, which will be shown and com- 
mented upon by the entire group. This meeting 
provides an opportunity for a free exchange of ideas 
and helpful hints on garden photography. 

Evenings are slated for the first Tuesday of each 
month. Ann Wertsner Wood will discuss Christmas 
decorations and answer questions about materials and 
techniques on Tuesday, DecemlDer 5, 7:30 P. M. This 
meeting coincides with the Society's annual Christmas 
Show. 

The Horticultural Society library will open at 
6:30 P.M. for the convenience of members. Miss 
Ann Waterman, Librarian, will be present to assist 
members who may come early to browse or to do 
serious studying. Books may be brought in and checked 
out during this hour. Mrs. H. Rowland Timms of 
Wallingford is chairman of the Members' Evenings. 



CHRYSANTHEMUM SHOW 
OCTOBER 28-29 

The combined eti'orts of the iMen's Chrysanthe- 
mum Club of Norristown and The Pennsylvania Horti- 
cultural Society will result in the Greater Delaware 
Valley Chrysanthemum Show October 28-29, in the 
Stewart Armory, Harding Boulevard, Norristown, Pa. 
Tickets are not necessary, but niemliers are asked 
to use the tearout tickets which were included in a 
special insert in last month's NEWS to help record 
member attendance. 

Stewart Armory is at the edge of Elmwood Park 
and across the street from the Roosevelt Football 
Stadium in Norristown. 



A special preview of a portion of a film on land- 
scaping will be shown to members at the Annual 
Meeting of The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society 
on November 15 at 2:30 P.M., 389 Suburban Station. 
Photographed with the intention that it is to become 
a part of a complete story on organizing outdoor space, 
this film in its finished form will carry important and 
helpful information to gardeners and home owners 
everywhere. When completed it will be rented for a 
small fee to civic groups and other organizations 
throughout the country for use in their programs. 
While funds are not yet available for completing the 
film, the Center Square Green landscaping demonstra- 
tion of the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society offered 
the opportunity to get a wealth of progress shots 
which will make a valuable portion of the finished 
story. There has been a critical need for such infor- 
mation to be presented with practicality and imagina- 
tion. It is hoped that the Society can fill this need 
by completing the film in the very near future. 

The Annual Meeting also coincides with the 
opening of the exhibit "Paintings from Plants and 
Gardens". All Committee reports will be in published 
form ready for distribution at the meeting. Refresh- 
ments will be served. 



PAINTINGS FROM PLANTS AND GARDENS 

Paintings from Plants and Gardens will be shown 
in the rooms of the Horticultural Society, Suburban 
Station Building, November 15 to 30, from 9:30 A. M. 
to 5 :00 P. M. daily. All paintings are the works of 
members who have interpreted their garden experi- 
ences on canvass, paper and illustration board. The 
opening of this show coincides with the 135th Annual 
Meeting of the Society, at 2:30 P.M., November 15. 
Refreshments will be served. 



NEWS FROM THE LIBRARY 



NEW BOOKS 

The wonderful life of flowers by Paul Jaeger, trans. 
by J. P. M. Brenan. Button (printed in France), 
1961. 195 pp., illus. col. pis. $12.50 ($15.00 after 
January 1, 1962). 

Possibly never before has the text of a book 
of this nature been so beautifully illustrated. 
Each photograph is in the "Oh-my!" category. 
"As a result of an immense amount of research 
the author is able to discuss in detail [the] make- 
up and functions of flowers, the effects of heat 
and light, the factors governing growth, the vari- 
ous methods of pollination [self and cross, wind, 
bee, bat, and flightless mammal], and their 
use to man as medicines, perfumes, and food." 
After reading this book one cannot help but have 
a far broader understanding of the plant kingdom : 
from the history and distribution of plants, to 
plant preservation, and how important keen ob- 
servation is in learning more about their processes. 

It is the perfect Christmas gift for naturalists, 
gardeners, and students of botany because of 
its excellent photographs and review of floral 
mechanisms. Because of the uniqueness of this 
book the Society will obtain copies for its mem- 
bers at the special pre-publication price of $12.50. 
Please place your order with the Librarian before 
December 1. 

Japanese floral art; symbolism, cult, and practice by 

Rachel E. Carr. Van Nostrand, 1961. xix-377 pp., 
illus., 32 col. pis. $12.50. 

A practical book that goes beyond flower ar- 
rangement, as the title indicates, is that by the 
author of Stepping Stones to Japanese Floral Art 
and other books already familiar to members of 
the Society. The book is divided into three 
parts: Ikebana, containers and techniques, and 
application in three styles (Seika, Nageire and 
Moribana). More than 400 illustrations are used. 
Mrs. Carr is the only foreigner to have received 
a Master's Degree from the Koryu School. 

The complete book of lilies by F. F. Rockwell, Esther 
C. Grayson and Jan de Graaff, Doubleday, 1961. 
352 pp., illus. $5.95. 

The subtitle of this book is : "How to select, 
plant, care for, exhibit, and propagate lilies of 
all types, with 110 photographs, 31 in color and 
21 line drawings by Virginia Howie". Mr. de 
Graaff is the person to whom we are grateful for 
developing more new lily varieties than any 
other hybridizer in the world. These hybrids are 
more easily grown in gardens than the natural 
species. The new information in this book makes 
the reading of it highly recommended. 



Variegated foliage plants by Paul Fischer, trans, and 
ed. by Corry Van Alphen. Blandford, 1960 (dis- 
tributed by St. Martin's Press). 136pp., illus., 
col. pis. $3.50. 

One hundred and twenty-two genera of colorful 
indoor plants are described and well illustrated 
with 96 photographs. It is encouraging to see 
the full usage of the plant names, i.e. genus, 
species, variety and authority with the exception 
of the latter which is not given for cultivar names. 
The arrangement is alphabetical by genus and 
following each group are cultivation instructions 
with notes on propagation. 

Hardy heaths; and some of their nearer allies rev. 
ed. by A. T. Johnson. Blandford Press, 1956 
(distributed bj' St. Martin's Press). 127pp., f.p., 
16 pis. $2.50. 

This handbook, though primarily of interest to 
gardeners in Great Britain, will be eagerly read 
by many Americans. The relatively little care in 
growing these plants is one of their assets. 

PERIODICALS 

The plant society bulletins, gardening magazines 
and horticultural journals for 1960 have just been 
returned from the bindery. 

GIVE BOOKS FOR CHRISTMAS 

For suggestions of books for Christmas gifts 
the Librarian will provide you with a list upon request. 
The list covers many topics of horticulture including 
garden encyclopedias, gardening outdoors and in, 
landscape gardening-design, maintenance and con- 
struction, plant propagation and pruning, wild flowers 
and ferns and also flower arrangement. By ordering 
through our Librarian you will be giving two gifts 
in one. The Society receives a discount, which is added 
to the new book budget of the library. 



FOUND: EXTRA SPECIAL CHRISTMAS GIFT 

Yes, this is the suggestion I've been looking for 
to complete my list. A family membership for them. 
They will benefit from the horticultural information: 
in the NEWS and HORTICULTURE magazine each 
month, from the Philadelphia Flower Show, Chrysan- 
themum Show, Christmas Show, plant exchange, 
garden visits, clinics, special symposiums, members' 
evenings and the services of the Society's valuable 
horticultural library. They will find this a source of 
practical information and will enjoy meeting other 
gardeners and horticulture enthusiasts. And the price 
easily fits my budget — only $14.00. 

Signed, Christmas Shopper 
(& who isn't?) 



SCHEDULED ANNOUNCED FOR CHRISTMAS SHOW 



The 1961 Christmas Show of The Pennsylvania 
Horticultural Society will take place in the rooms of 
the Society, 389 Suburban Station Building, December 
4 to 8. Mrs. W. C. Hogg, Jr., of Wallingford, Junior 
Providence Garden Club, is Chairman of the Show. 
Mrs. Charles T. Porter, of Kennett Square, Spade and 
Trowel Garden Club, is Co-chairman. Members of 
both groups will assist in planning and staging the 
Show. 

Continuing the trend of last year, emphasis is being 
placed on the use of materials of plant origin in 
Christmas decorations. Branches, foliage, pods, cones, 
seed heads and other materials of plant origin provide 
a richness to Christmas decorations which is difficult 
to achieve with artificial materials. 

In the schedule, treated materials (painted, dried, 
etc.) may be used in all classes unless otherwise stated. 
Artificial materials — ornaments, fruits, glass bulbs, 
etc. — also may be used in combination with the 
materials of plant origin unless otherwise stated. 

All entries must be staged by 11:00 A.M. Mon- 
day, December 4, and must be removed after 1 :00 
P. M. Friday, December 8. All classes are open to 
everyone. 

SCHEDULE 

1. Christmas Punch Table. Tables 5 feet by 3 feet 
8 inches provided ; must be covered by exhibitor, 
(limited to three entries). 

2. Wreath for outdoor use. 

3. Wreath for indoor use. 

4. Door decoration other than a wreath for use 
either outdoors or indoors. 

5. A decorated sconce with candles. 

6. A Christmas mobile, largest dimension not to 
exceed 36 inches. 

7. Arrangement using a figure in the spirit of 
Christmas. 

8. An arrangement using fresh plant materials only, 
to be staged in a niche 24 inches high by 20 inches 
wide by 14 inches deep. Background permitted, 
(limited to seven entries). 

9. Contemporary Christmas — an arrangement to be 
staged in a niche 24 inches high by 20 inches wide 
by 14 inches deep. Background permitted, 
(limited to seven entries). 

10. An arrangement featuring a candelabrum or simi- 
lar, branched holder with candles. 

11. A Christmas package, decorated. 



12. Invitation Class. Decorated Christmas tree not 
less than 4 feet and not more than 4 feet 10 inches 
high including container, not more than 2 feet 
8 inches wide, to be staged in the windows of the 
Suburban Station Branch of the Girard Trust 
Corn Exchange Bank, on the ground floor of the 
Suburban Station Building. To be judged, 
(limited to four entries). 

13. Holly, cut specimen named — American, Chinese, 
English and their Hybrids. 

14. Collection of six or more different pods and/or 
cones, exhibited in a wooden bowl, label must be 
firmly attached to each specimen. 

RULES 

1. All exhibits must be staged by 11 A. M. Monday, 
December 4, and must be removed after 1 P. M. 
Friday, December 8. 

2. Classes are open to everyone whether members of 
the Society or not. 

3. Only one entry per class allowed. 

4. Ground Pine and Dogwood are prohibited from 
use. 

5. Plant material must be used in all classes. Some 
artificial materials may be used unless otherwise 
stated. 

6. The decision of the Judges will be final. 
Assistance in unloading will be provided. 
Exhibitors will be re-imbursed for parking fees. 

AWARDS 

Awards will consist of seals : first, second, third 
and honorable mention. A gift certificate in the 
amount of $5.00 will be awarded to the most 
outstanding entry in the Show. 



r 



CHRISTMAS SHOW ENTRY BLANK 

(Clip oul and mail to 389 Suburban Station Bldg. 
by November 29, 1961) 
Please reserve space for my entry in the 
following classes : 



Name 

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Telephone 

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DATES To Mark On Your CALENDER 

OCTOBER 28-29 (Saturday and Sunday) 

GREATER DELAWARE VALLEY CHRYSANTHEMUM SHOW 

Stewart Armory, Norristown 
Saturday 4:00-10:00 P.M. 
Sunday 12:00-5:00 P.M. 

NOVEMBER 5 (Sunday) BUDGET LANDSCAPE DAY 

2:00-5:00 P.M. Center Square Green 

NOVEMBER 7 (Tuesday) MEMBERS' EVENING 

7:30 P.M. 
389 Suburban Station Building 

NOVEMBER 15 (Wednesday) 2:30 P.M. 

ANNUAL MEETING OF THE SOCIETY 

389 Suburban Station Building 

NOVEMBER 15-30 PAINTINGS FROM PLANTS AND GARDENS 

9:30 A.M. -5:00 P.M. daily 
389 Suburljan Station Building 

DECEMBER 4 - 8 CHRISTMAS SHOW 

9:30 A.M. -5:00 P.M. 
389 Sul)url)an Station Building 

DECEMBER 5 (Tuesday) MEMBERS' EVENING 

7:30 P.M. 
389 Suburban Station Building 



EXECUTIVE SECRETARY TO RETIRE 

It is with regret that the Executive Council of 
The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society received and 
accepted the resignation of Mrs. Kathryn B. Semple, 
Executive Secretary of the Society, to become effective 
on January 1, 1962. Mrs. Semple joined the staff of 
the Society in October 1952 and until recently carried 
the full responsibility for the operation of the ofifice 
as well as the hundreds of details necessary to keeping 
the machinery of our Society running smoothly. Our 
many members who have enjoyed Mrs. Semple's 
gracious cooperation will miss her, but I know we all 
wish her well as she retires to enjoy her home and 
garden in Wynnewood. 

Henry D. Mirick 
President 



HORTICULTURIST JOINS STAFF 

Miss Mary O. Milton, for the past five and 
a half years has been Propagator at the Morris 
Arboretum of the University of Pennsylvania, will 
join the staff of The Pennsylvania Horticultural 
Society as Horticulturist on December 1, 1961. Miss 
Milton is a graduate of Ambler School of Horticulture 
and is an active member of the Plant Propagator's 
Society. Many members already know Miss Milton 
through her work at the Arboretum, and many met 
her when she spoke at our first Fall Garden Day. We 
look forward to her assistance in continuing the de- 
velopment and expansion of various phases of The 
Pennsylvania Horticultural Society's programs. 

Henry D. Mirick 
President 



THE PENNSYLVANIA 
HORTiCULTURr- 



SOCIE 



1617 PENNSYLVANIA BOULEVARD 
PHILADELPHIA 3. PENNSYLVANIA 




Jfno MARt* 



VOL. II No. 12 



DECEMBER 1961 



LECTURES ANNOUNCED 

Anne Wertsner Wood (Mrs. Harry Wood), 
Chairman of the Lectures Committee of the Penn- 
sylvania Horticultural Society, has announced three 
lectures for January and February. 

On Tuesday, January 9, 2:00 P.M., Dr. Samuel 
L. Emsweller. Leader, Ornamental Investigations. 
U. S. Dept. of Agriculture, Beltsville, Md., will present 
an illustrated lecture, "Some Recent Developments 
in Research in Ornamental Plants", in the Suburban 
Room (Concourse Level) of the Sheraton Hotel, 
Philadelphia. Dr. Emsweller is widely known for his 
work with the development and improvement of many 
plant groups. 

Dr. William C. Steere, Director of the New York 
Botanical Garden, Bronx Park, N. Y., will present 
"Flowers of the Trunda", on Tuesday, January 23, 
at 2:00 P.M. in the Penn Center Room (Concourse 
Level) of the Sheraton Hotel. Dr. Steere's slides have 
been taken over a period of eight seasons of botanical 
exploration in the Arctic, Alaska, Canada and 
Lapland. The plant gems he has found in the far north 
are a delight to behold. 

On Tuesday, February 20, at 2:00 P.M., also in 
tiie Penn Center Room of the Sheraton Hotel, Daniel 
J. Foley, author, editor and lecturer, of Salem, Mass., 
will present an illustrated talk. "Unusual Plants for 
Home Gardens". Mr. Foley will discuss tree peonies, 
clematis, lilies, hostas and will place special emphasis 
on plants for shady places. He will also include 
much valuable information on the culture and uses of 
these materials. 

There is no charge for any of these lectures, 
and members are urged to bring guests. 



MORE ON RABBIT CONTROL 
■ ... from The Horticultural Newsletter 

ARASAN 42-S thiram Disinfectant when painted 
on the trunk of a tree or shrub will protect it against 
rabbits, most mice and against the Ijrowsing of deer. 
Sprayed on the ground around a garden it is usually 
effective in preventing animals from invading the 
garden. Normally one application will last for weeks 
even though there are heavy rains. It is ideal for 
protecting fmit and other trees during the winter 
when most animal damage occurs. 



GARDEN CLINICS - 1962 

The Garden Clinics for winter and spring 1962 
have been announced by Mrs. J. J. Willaman of 
Plymouth Meeting, Chairman of the Garden Clinics 
Committee of the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society. 

The first clinic, "Growing Plants Under Artificial 
Light" by Ernesta Drinker Ballard (Mrs. Frederic L. 
Ballard, Jr.) is scheduled for Jan. 12, 7:00-9:00 P.M.. 
389 Suburban Station Building, Philadelphia. No limit 
on attendance; registration fee $2.00. If you own a 
basement, a space on your kitchen counter under the 
shelves or a dark corner anywhere, you can grow 
healthy, blossoming plants. 

The dictionary defines "perennial" as "continuing 
without intermission; never failing". Does that 
describe your perennial border? Martha Ludes Garra 
(Mrs. Edward J. Garra) has planned a series on 
perennials for Wednesday mornings at 10:30-12:30, 
January 24 and 31, 389 Suburban Station Building. 
The third session, outdoors, is scheduled for June. 
Registration is limited to six metnbers who will 
attend all sessions. The lucky six will work with 
charts which have movable sections to make planning 
easy, and the use of annuals and bulbs with the peren- 
nials also will be considered. At the second session, 
the members will bring charts to class for discussion 
and correction. Fee for the series is $6.00. (No regis- 
tration for a single session accepted.) 

February brings a pair of clinics as a unit: 
"Home Greenhouse Practice" by Mrs, Ballard. The 
first session will take place in the Society Room?, 
February 13, at 7:00 P.M. and will be devoted to 
the why and wherefore of soils, watering, feeding, 
fumigating — all basic practices to keep your green- 
house at maximum efficiency. The second session 
will be in Chestnut Hill on Saturday, February 17, 
at 2:00 P.M. in a greenhouse. Registration fee 
$4.00 for the unit; limit 25 people. 

Especially for the masculine contingent of our 
gardening members (Init feminine members will also 
be allowed to register) on March 27, at 7:00 P.M. 
in the Rooms of the Society, Mrs. Garra will explain 
the construction of steps, paths, walls and terraces, 
with charts and slides. Helpful solutions to many 

(Continued Next Page) 



GARDEN CLINICS— (Continued) 

garden problems will be given to do-it-yourself 

gardeners. Fee $2.(X); no limit on registration. 

On Saturday. April 14, at 2:00 P.M., at Chestnut 
Hill, Mrs. Ballard will explain espaliers. Each mem- 
ber will have the opportunity to purchase a shrub 
and to prune it during the clinic. When it is planted 
at home the knowledge gained will provide guidance 
for producing a garden showpiece. Fee $2.00; 
registration limited to seven people. 

Planning ahead for ease of maintenance is some- 
thing we all try for each Spring and never quite 
accomplish. On Thursday, April 19, at Ambler, at 
10:30 A.M., Martha Ludes Garra will go into this 
l^roblem thoroughly, discussing the use of a proper 
plan, ground covers, mulches, chemicals, plant disease 
resistance and other topics for easier gardening in 
1962. Fee $2.00; limit twenty people. 

In all clinics, the committee has stressed basic 
horticulture and the fun of doing things yourself. 

We regret that there must be a limit to registra- 
tion in the clinics. This is necessary because of the 
nature of the work. There is always the possibility 
of a repeat if enough people register. See last page 
for registration blank. 



CLASS 46 CHRYSANTHEMUM TROPHY RETIRED 

The David Leslie Poe Memorial Award was won 
for the third time by Otis S. Reynolds, Norristown, 
Pa., at the 1961 Chrysanthemum Show, which was 
staged in cooperation with the Men's Chrysanthemum 
Club of Norristown. Class 46 has been of special 
interest to members of the Society since its establish- 
ment in 1954. Each exhibitor receives three plants 
of unknown variety in April or May and must display 
all surviving plants at the Show. In order to retain 
permanent possession of the Trophy — a silver tray — 
it was necessary to win first place in this class on 
three different occasions. 



BOOK GIFTS FROM MEMBERS 

We are pleased to acquire this past month won- 
derful books from three meml^ers. Rare books from 
W. Atlee Burpee, Jr. are : Materia Medica of Dioscorides 
in Greek and Latin, indexed by J. A. Sarrasin, 1589; 
Istoria Botanica I)y G. Zanoni, 1635 ; and Systema naturae 
1st ed. by Linnaeus, 1735 (repr. 1907). 

The eighth supplement to Eltves' monograph of the 
genus Lilium 1960 and The Rachel McMasters Miller Hunt 
Botanical Library . . . its collection, program and staff by 
G.H.M. Lawrence and others. 1%1. are gifts from 
George R. Clark. 

Luther Burbank. his methods and discoveries 3 vols.. 
is presented by Mrs. Morris E. Swartz. 



COUNCIL LETTER ON HIGHWAY ROUTE 

The proposed Cross-County (Delaware Co., Pa.) 
highway may inflict serious damage on the plantings 
of the Arthur Hoyt Scott Horticultural Foundation 
of Swarthmore College. 

At the direction of the Executive Council of the 
Pennsylvania Horticultural Society, the Director 
wrote the following letter to the Hon. Rex M. 
Whitton, Federal Highway Administrator, Bureau of 
Public Roads, Washington, D. C. : 

"Dear Administrator Whitton : 

Before the final determination of the Cross- 
County (Delaware County, Pa.) highway, known as 
the Blue Route, may we urge that the most careful 
consideration be given to the possibility of irreparable 
damage which might be done to the valuable and 
unique collections of the Arthur Hoyt Scott Horti- 
cultural Foundation of Swarthmore College. 

"The Scott Foundation is over thirty years old 
and has become one of the most important institutions 
of its type in the United States. The greatest value 
of the Scott plantings is in their influence on the 
thousands of individuals who visit and study them 
every year. As our suburbs grow, it becomes increas- 
ingly important not only to preserve green areas, 
but also to impress upon the new suburban public 
the importance and value of planting trees, shrubs, 
vines and other ornamental plants. Only through 
such influence can we keep today's suburb from 
becoming tomorrow's slum. 

"The hundreds of ornamental crab apples, flower- 
ing cherries, and the experimental plantings of rhodo- 
dendrons are not things which can be moved. It 
would be impossible to save some of these plants. 
An important breeding program, such as that for 
rhododendrons, requires many years before results 
can be evaluated : plants in the Scott tests mav lead 
to significant advances in this field if given the 
opportunity. 

"The Scott Foundation is a mature educational 
activity. Again I urge that every consideration be 
given to the preservation of its collections because 
their future value will be even greater than that of 
the present." 



NEWS FROM THE LIBRARY 



NEW BOOKS (available to members by mail) 
Roadside flowers of Texas by Harold S. Irwin with 
paintings by Mary Motz Wills. Austin, Univ. 

(Texas Press, 1961. xii, 295 pp., col. illus. $5.75. 
Mrs. Wills, a long-time painter of Texas wild 
flowers presents 257 lovely watercolors within 
this book. These include both widely distributed 
and common plants. Dr. Irwin provides helpful 
keys to species identifications and a descriptive 
text with range of plants and common names. 
The arrangement of plants follows the accepted 
phylogenetic sequence. It is exciting to see such 
a book published for the layman. Members plan- 
ning a vacation in Texas and those interested 
in increasing their knowledge of the native and 
introduced plants of Texas will enjoy reading 
this book. 

Wild flowers by Homer D. House. Macmillan, 1961. 
362 pp., illus. 264 pis. (Reissue of 1934 ed. from 
new plates.) $17.95. 

At last the long out-of-print wild flower book 
containing full page color photographs of common 
American plants is again available. Unfortunately 
the nomenclature is not revised so one must have 
at hand a copy of Fernald's Gray's Manual of 
Botany or Gleason's New Britton & Brown Illustrated 
Flora. Realizing this fact, the nearlv 400 plants 
which are described accurately and in detail along 
with the inclusive glossary, this handsome book 
is unsurpassed in its field. 

The librarian has compiled a mimeographed 
list of synonyms which is available to members 
who own or are thinking of owning a copy of 
this book. 

New horizons in flower arrangement by Myra J. 
Brooks, Mary Alice and John P. Roche. M. 

t Barrows, 1961. 192 pp., illus., black and white 

and color. $10.00. 
Now is the time of year to renew your approach 
to flower arrangement and this book is an excel- 
lent one with which to begin. The collaborators 
are an outstanding American team in both ar- 
rangement and photography. The book is divided 
into four parts : flower arrangers' holidays, the 
amateur craftsman, the designer craftsman, and 
flower show. It truly is inspirational for all 
arrangers. 
Ikebana. The Japanese art of flower arrangement 
by Hiroshi Ohchi with the assistance of Ikenobo 
Inst, of Flower Arrangement, Kyoto. 2d. ed. 
Eng. & Germ, text, the former modified by C. C. 
Palmer. Hastings House (distributors), 1961. 
124 pp.. 132 illus., 16 in color. $5.95. 

Both the classical and modern Ikebana tech- 
niques are explained and illustrated in this book 
I with the latter relating its influence to modern 



art. The author writes: "... the Japanese 
people have used flowers to meet certain of their 
essential needs — the need to make life beautiful, 
to add poetry to it, to make it happy. Certain 
conditions have to be fulfilled and a definite order 
has to be observed if plants are made to look 
more beautiful so as to enter into our lives. This 
order is embodied in the traditional Ikebana of 
Japan." Recommended to all flower arrangers. 

Plants, viruses, and insects by Katherine Esau. 
Harvard Univ. Press, 1%1. vi' 110 pp., illus. $3.75. 
How do nutrients, viruses, insecticides, and 
herbicides move through plant tissues? Dr. Esau 
and her coUaboraters are doing very fundamental 
and important work in order to answer this 
question. The author reviews the early explora- 
tion of translocation in plant tissues, explains 
how insects feed on the tissue (phloem) of plants 
where translocation occurs and skillfully relates 
a bit on the interaction of viruses which may be 
compatible with the cells or may result in com- 
plete destruction of the host cell, eventually 
leading to death of the plant. Excellent photo- 
micrographs clearly show the anatomical details 
which include the feeding tracts of insects. 

How to grow vegetables and fruits by the organic 
method ed. by J. I. Rodale. Rodale Books, 1961. 
926 pp., illus. $6.95. 

As the title indicates this is another book for 
organic gardeners. It is compiled from the actual 
experiences of people who correspond or have 
come in direct contact with the staff of Organic 
Gardening and Farming. Growing of nuts, herbs 
and tropical fruits supplement the chapters on 
vegetables and fruits. 

The biology of weeds a symposium of the British 
Ecological Society, ed. by John L. Harper. (From 
Charles C. Thomas, Pub.), Blackwell Sci. Pub., 
1960. XV, 256 pp., illus. $9.75. 

Many interesting individual papers on weeds 
covering history, taxonomic problems, dispersal, 
single species problems such as the Plantagos and 
many more are in this volume. Some are of 
interest to readers of technical papers, others 
to those interested in solving practical problems 
of weeds. Recommended reading for anyone 
preparing a talk on weeds. 

PERIODICALS 

The library has just received vol. 77 for 1961 of 
the Proceedings of the American Society for Horticultural 
Science which contains numerous articles on recent 
research in the physiology- of cultivated plants plus 
a list of new vegetable varieties. We are lacking 
several volumes. Because of its value to our library 
it would be an important contribution if a member 
would help us in obtaining them. 



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MEMBERS' EVENINGS 

The second in the series of special evenings 
for members will take place on Tuesday, December 5, 
7:30 P.M. This is planned as a special open house 
in connection with the Society's annual Christmas 
Show. Anne Wertsner Wood (Mrs. Harry Wood) 
will be on hand to answer members' questions about 
the decorations and about techniques used in con- 
struct them. (This is not a lecture-demonstration). 

The third special evening for members is 
scheduled for Tuesday, January 2. Harry Wood of 
Swarthmore will discuss choice evergreens and will 
have plant specimens on hand for examination. 



GARDEN CLINIC REGISTRATION 

(see page 1 for details) 

Register bv using the rliv-out coupon below. Send it to 389 
Suburban Station, Philadelphia 3. Registrations will be accepted in 
the order received: runfirmatinn will be made by return post card. 

— — — — — — — — — — — — --^ 

GARDEN CLINIC ■ 

REGISTRATION | 

Please register me for the Garden Clinic r 

($2.00 per memlier). 

January 12 GROWING PLANTS 

UNDER ARTIFICIAL LIGHT I 

Name „ I 

Address „ | 

Telephone „ | 



DATES To Mark On Your CALENDER 

NOVEMBER 15-30 PAINTINGS FROM PLANTS AND GARDENS 

9:30 A.M. -5:00 P. M. daily 
389 Suburban Station Building 

DECEMBER 4-8 CHRISTMAS SHOW 

9:30 A.M. -5:00 P.M. 
389 Suburban Station Building 

DECEMBER 5 (Tuesday) MEMBERS' EVENING 

7:30 P.M. 
389 Suburban Station Building 

DECEMBER 25 MERRY CHRISTMAS! 

JANUARY 2 (Tuesday) MEMBERS' EVENING 

7:30 P.M. 
389 Suburban Station Building 

JANUARY 9 (Tuesday) LECTURE: 

SOME RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN HORTICULTURAL PLANTS 

Dr. Samuel L. Emsweller 

2:00 P.M. 

Sheraton Hotel 

JANUARY 12 (Friday) GARDEN CLINIC: 

GROWING PLANTS UNDER ARTIFICIAL LIGHT 

JANUARY 23 (Tuesday) LECTURE: 

FLOWERS OF THE TRUNDA 

Dr. A\'illiam Steere 

2 :00 P. M. 

Sheraton Hotel 

JANUARY 24 & 31 (Wednesday) GARDEN CLINIC: 
PERENNIAL BORDERS I & II 

10:30-12:30 



1617 PENNSYLVANIA BOULEVARD 
PHILADELPHIA 3. PENNSYLVANIA 




^rto MARt* 



VOL III No. I 



JANUARY 1962 



PROTECTION vs. OVERPROTECTION 



» 



Basic winter protection for gardens involves 
three factors ; temperature, moisture and mechanical 
damage. The first, temperature, applies mostly to the 
roots and crowns of plants, while moisture loss and 
mechanical damage are most evident in evergreens, 
particularly the broadleaf types. It is possible, how- 
ever, to overprotect many plants by failing to under- 
stand some of the factors involved. 

The climate of the Greater Delaware Valley is 
such that we need protection not so much from cold 
as from the constant fluctuation of temperature. More 
northern areas experience temperature fluctuations, 
too, but ours are mostly those from just below to 
just above freezing. Constant freezing and thawing, 
with the resulting expansion and contraction of the 
soil and of plant tissues is responsible for the winter 
killing of many herbaceous perennials. It would be 
more desirable if the temperature dropped below 
freezing and stayed there until time came for the 
spring thaw. 

To protect plants from temperature changes, it 
is important to wait for a cold period of at least a 
few days' duration so that the soil becomes frozen ; 
then mulch to keep the soil cold, not warm. The 
mulch provides an insulating blanket which protects 
the dormant plants and the soil from fluctuating air 
temperatures. 

The disadvantages of early mulching are many. 
One of the most important is the harboring of disease 
organisms. Observation has shown that roses which 
are hilled for the winter in the Greater Philadelphia 
area are more prone to canker invasion at the crown 
of the plant than those which are not hilled. Soil 
(or other mulches) applied too early around the 
crowns of the plants retains warmth, becomes soggy 
in winter rains and shelters the canker organism. 
Plants may start growth in the spring and soon die, 
not from the rigors of winter but from canker. 

Recent tests by the United States Department of 
Agriculture indicate that the retention of relatively 
high soil temperature when air temperature is low 
is detrimental to evergreens. This condition is created 
when mulches are applied too early, before the soil 



is cold or frozen, yet many gardeners believe that 
they are being especially alert if they mulch ever- 
greens heavily in October and November. Snow as 
a mulch may be helpful or detrimental depending 
upon the plant considered and/or soil and air tempera- 
tures during a given period. The bark of many old 
boxwoods split and peeled from the stems last winter; 
this could have resulted from the fact that a snow 
cover helped to maintain high soil temperatures 
(25-30°F.) when the tops of the plants were exposed 
to temperatures near zero. 

One of the best mulches for winter protection 
costs practically nothing, is easy to obtain and is 
neat: unsold Christmas trees. Branches cut from the 
short-needled types are especially good because, 
turned upside-down, they form springy arches over the 
crowns of plants. Air moyement is cut to a minimum 
near the soil surface, so the winter winds do not dry 
the soil. At the same time, the branches do not 
become soggy, heavy and airless. Perhaps the great- 
est advantage of Christmas trees is that mulching too 
early is nearly impossible simply because the trees are 
not available until after December 25. 

For broadleaf evergreens, protection from winter 
sun and winds is also needed. In the case of the 
smaller plants, the Christmas tree branches can be 
stuck vertically into the soil around each plant to 
arch over it (top side of the branch toward the plant 
to be protected). This provides shade and windbreak, 
and most certainly is more attractive than the too 
often seen tents of burlap. For a larger broadleaf 
evergreen — a camellia, tender holly — why not place 
one or more whole Christmas trees close to the plant 
on the windward and sunny sides? Be sure the trees 
are set firmly enough to withstand winter winds. 
With a crowbar make a hole in the soil to receive 
the butt of each tree and use stout stakes to hold it 
in place. 

For protection from breakage where snow load 
is a problem, wrap small-leaved evergreens (boxwood, 
yews, small-leaved hollies) with mesh wire — the 
kind with the hexagonal holes — which is available in 

(Continued Next Page) 



JANUARY LECTURES 

Two lectures will be sponsored by the Society in 
January in the Sheraton Hotel, Philadelphia. Both 
are open to members, their guests and to the general 
public, without admission charge. "Some Recent De- 
velopments in Horticultural Plants" by Dr. Samuel L. 
Emsweller, Leader, Ornamental Investigations, of the 
United States Department of Agriculture, will be 
presented on January 9. Dr. William C. Steere, Direc- 
tor of the New York Botanical Garden, will speak 
on "Flowers of the Tundra" on January 23. 

Dr. Emsweller has been in charge of ornamental 
plant research for the Department of Agriculture since 
1935 and has become a recognized leader in the im- 
provement of garden plants. His acres of hybrid lilies 
in West Virginia are a result of his interest in genetic 
and cytologic investigations in connection with de- 
veloping tetraploid lilies, but his interest ranges far 
beyond this plant group. Dr. Emsweller has published 
many scientific papers and articles on plant improve- 
ment. His illustrated lecture is bound to whet the 
plant lover's appetite. 

Dr. William C. Steere came to the New York 
Botanical Garden in 1958 from Stanford University, 
where he last served as Dean of the Graduate Division. 
In addition to his position at the Garden, he is Pro- 
fessor of Botany at Columbia University. His particu- 
lar interest in the plants of the western hemisphere 
is revealed by the long list of special projects and 
expeditions in which he has participated in Puerto 
Rico, Colombia, Ecuador, Mexico, Canada and Alaska. 
A particularly delightful account of adventure in 
Alaska in the summer of 1961, by Dr. and Mrs. Steere, 
appears on page 200 of the November - December issue 
of The Garden Journal (of the New York Botanical 
Garden). Via Dr. Steere's illustrated lecture, mem- 
bers of the Society and their guests will have the 
opportunity to travel to the tundra with him. 

PROTECTION— {Cont'd) 

several widths. The wire can be pulled tightly 
enough to form a supporting cylinder around box- 
woods and upright yews and yet be hardly visible. 
(Hick's yew is very easily damaged by the snow 
load.) Where plants especially prone to this type 
of damage, leave the wire on permanently — the foliage 
grows through it — and every two or three years put 
on another cylinder as the old one disintegrates (out 
of sight inside the plant mass). 

While none of the above is startling or new, it is 
surprising how many of us garden by habit, by ritual 
and by rule. Plants are living organisms subject to 
all sorts of influences and conditions. As such it is 
well to examine habits to see if, in the light of new 
understanding of how plants grow and new ideas and 
techniques, we really are good gardeners. This is our 
challenge for the New Year. 



RABBIT REPELLENT 
AVAILABLE TO MEMBERS 

The item in last month's NEWS about Arasan 
42-S (a repellent for rabbits, meadow mice and deer) 
which has not become available in garden supply 
outlets, stimulated such a response that we have ob- 
tained a supply of the material (with an added sticker) 
for the convenience of members of the Society. It is 
available in the office (389 Suburban Station Building) 
in eight-ounce bottles at $2.00 each. 

Sorry, we cannot accept mail or telephone orders, 
but we suggest that you check with us by telephone 
(LO 3-8352) before coming in, since we may have 
difficulty keeping a sufficient supply on hand to meet 
the demand. 



MEMBERS' EVENINGS 

The first Members' Evening of the new year is 
scheduled for January 2, 7:30 P.M., when Harry 
Wood, formerly Superintendent and Head Gardener, 
Swarthmore College, will discuss outstanding and 
unusual evergreens. He will present labeled branches 
of each, so members may examine them closely. 

On February 6, the Members' Evening will fea- 
ture Mr. and Mrs. Arthur B. Wells of Bryn Athyn 
and their cacti. 

The Library opens at 6:30 P.M. on Members' 
Evenings. If you have any suggestions for topics 
for presentation at these events, please write to the 
Chairman, Mrs. H. Rowland Timms, in care of the 
Society. 

PAINTINGS EARN AWARDS 

Thirty-four members of the Society entered 
eighty paintings in the show, PAINTINGS FROM 
PLANTS AND GARDENS, which closed on Novem- 
ber 30. Louis C. Maderia and Kneeland McNulty of 
the Staff of the Philadelphia Museum of Art awarded 
special distinction seals to nineteen paintings. Re- 
ceiving the awards are Mrs. E. Page AUinson, Mrs. 
Louis P. Bell, Miss Elizabeth Fleisher, Horace T. 
Fleisher, Miss Marguerite Gibson, Miss Elizabeth 
Hoffman, Carlton B. Lees, Mrs. Elliston P. Morris, 
Frederick W. G. Peck, Mrs. Charles Piatt, Mrs. Gus- 
tave E. Rosenau, Mrs. C. F. Segermark, Mrs. Alfred 
L. Test, Mrs. Lloyd Van Sciver, Albert F. W. Vick, 
Jr., and Mrs. J. Peter Williams, III. 



HELP WANTED! 

. . . addressing, coding and stuffing thousands 
of envelopes for the Society's membership 
campaign. If you can give many hours, or 
only one or two, (9:30 A.M. -4:30 P.M., 
Tuesdays -Fridays) telephone Mrs. Taggart, 
Membership Secretary, and let her know 
when you can help. (LO 3-8352) 



NEWS FROM THE LIBRARY 

NEW BOOKS (available to members by moil) 



Christmas in the good old days; a Victorian album 
of stories, poems and pictures of personalities 
who rediscovered Christmas ed. by Daniel J. 
Foley, Philadelphia, Chilton Co., 1961. 224 pp., 
illus. $6.95. 

Interesting historically is the 19th Century use 
of evergreens in decorating, primarily with gar- 
lands, reproduced by illustrations in the chapter 
"A Portfolio of Holiday Decorations". A fine 
addition to a collection of Christmas books. 

Ground covers for easier gardening by Daniel J. Foley. 
Philadelphia, Chilton Co., 1961. 224 pp., illus. 
col. pis. $5.50. 

Mr. Foley is well known to gardeners in our 
area (see calendar of events last page) and his 
book will be a helpful aid to all gardeners. Its 
format is similar to Wyman's Trees for American 
Gardens and Shrubs and Vines for American Gardens. 

Roses; growing for exhibiting, by Harold H. Allen. 
Princeton, Van Nostrand, 1961. xvi, 175 pp., illus. 
$4.95. 

Many details are discussed by the author, who 
has won numerous awards at rose shows in this 
country. In the section devoted to mulches Mr. 
Allen lists many but says his favorite is cow 
manure. Personal anecdotes are interspersed 
throughout and conclude this helpful guide book. 

Cacti by Walter Kupper, trans. & ed. by Vera Higgins 
and illus. by Pia Roshardt. London, Nelson. 1960. 
127 pp., col. illus. $10.00. 

Mrs. Higgins, British cactus speciahst and 
author, has translated this absorbing text which 
contains habitat and distribution, cacti as pests, 
uses, environment and plant forms, spines, 
flowers, fruits, seeds and vegetative propagation. 
Each color plate is a botanical study and a work 
of art. 



The woody plants of Ohio; trees, shrubs, and woody 

■ climbers native, naturalized, and escaped by E. 

K Lucy Braun. Columbus, Ohio State Univ. Press, 

ft 1961. 362 pp., illus. col. fp. $7.50. 

^ This outstanding floristic book by Dr. Braun 

contains excellent line drawings of nearly three 
hundred species, showing both summer and win- 
ter characters and also distribution maps. "This 
book has two principal objectives: (1) to give 
information as to what species occur in Ohio . . ., 
and (2) to give amateurs, students, and field 
workers in the natural sciences a ready means 
of identifying woody plants at any season of the 
year." Pennsylvania being a neighboring state, 
this book includes information applicable here. 



The complete goiide to garden flowers ; an encyclopedia 
of garden planning ed. by Herbert Askwith. N. Y., 
A. S. Barnes & Co., 1961. 256 pp., col. illus. $12.50. 
Advisory editors are six leading American 
horticulturists. Plants are listed alphabetically 
by common name, indexed under both Latin and 
popular names ; descriptions include cultural notes 
and generally the approximate retail price; 1,000 
color plates are used in seed-catalog fashion. Also 
inserted from A-Z are articles on garden planning. 
Total contents : 275 entries. A good one-volume 
guide for amateur gardeners. 

Herbicides and the soil ed. by E. K. Woodford and 
G. R. Sagar (from Charles' C. Thomas, Pub.) 
Blackwell Sci. Pub., 1960. vii, 88 pp. Paper. $3.50.* 
Four papers which were presented at a sym- 
posium organized by the British Weed Control 
Council are issued under the above title. They 
cover herbicide resistance to bacterial attack, 
specific herbicides on soil micro-organisms, the 
theoretical approach and the beneficial effect of 
persistence of herbicides in the soil. 

Flowering cacti and other flowering plants by H. Rose, 
trans, by A. H. Walton. N. Y., Sterling Pub. Co., 
1%0. 100 pp., col. photos. $2.50. 

Written for the amateur cactus and succulent 
plant enthusiast, this little book contains plates 
of plants with brilliant flowers and sculptural 
forms, and brief plant descriptions, cultivation 
and care. 

Mark Catesby; the colonial Audubon by George Fred- 
erick Frick and Raymond Phineas Stearns. Ur- 
bana, Univ. Illinois Press, 1961. x, 137 pp., 16 pis. 
$5.00. 

The Society's library contains a good collection 
of early American naturalists' works, including a 
pre-Linnean work by Catesby. Little is known 
of the personal life of Mark Catesby, but the 
authors of this book have pieced together his biog- 
raphy in an interesting manner, and have given 
him proper recognition for his lasting contribution 
to science. Some of his engraved plates from 
The Natural History of Carolina, Florida and the 
Bahama Islands (1741-1743) are reproduced. This 
book presents a fascinating addition to the 18th 
Century naturalists' philosophy and achievements. 

GIFTS 

The library has just received gardening books 

and money to purchase Exotica III from the Wissa- 

hickon Garden Club in memory of the late Mrs. 

Keating Johnson. 

W. Atlee Burpee, Jr. presented us with the first 

edition of John Parkinson's Paradisi in Sole, 1629. 

This is perhaps the most loved garden book. In a 

facsimile edition, a circulating copy is available to 

members. 



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GARDEN CLINICS 

JANUARY 12 (Friday) 7:00 P.M. 

389 Suburban Station Building 

GROWING PLANTS UNDER ARTIFICIAL LIGHT 

Ernesta Drinker Ballard 
... a chance to learn how to garden almost any- 
where indoors. 

FEBRUARY 1 & 8 (Thursdays) 10:30 A.M. 

389 Suburban Station Building 

PLANNING THE HERBACEOUS BORDER 

Martha Ludes Garra 
This is a repeat of a three-part clinic devoted to 
planning for long season color. 

FEBRUARY 13 & 17 (Tuesday) 7:00 P.M. 

(Saturday) 2:00 P.M. 

HOME GREENHOUSE PRACTICE AND DEMONSTRATION 

Mrs. Ballard 
The first session takes place in the rooms of the 
Society and the second in Chestnut Hill. 

Register by using the clip-out coupon below. Send it to 389 
Suburban Station, Philadelphia .?. Registrations will be accepted in 
the order received: confirmation will be made by return post card. 

GARDEN CLINIC REGISTRATION 1 



Please register 



for the Garden Clinic : 
D January 12 GROWING PLANTS 

UNDER ARTIFICIAL LIGHT 

($2.00 per member) 
□ February 1 & 8 (third session to be 

scheduled for June) PLANNING THE 

HERBACEOUS BORDER 

($6.00 per member) 
D February 13 & 17 HOME 

GREENHOUSE PRACTICE 

($4.00 per member) 

Name _ 

Address _ 

Telephone „ 



DATES To Mark On Your CALENDAR 

JANUARY 2 (Tuesday) MEMBERS' EVENING 7:30 P.M. 
UNUSUAL EVERGREENS 

Harry Wood 
389 Suburban Station Building 

JANUARY 9 (Tuesday) LECTURE 2:00 P.M. 

SOME RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN HORTICULTURAL PLANTS 

Dr. Samuel L. Emsweller 
(Sheraton Hotel) 

JANUARY 12 (Friday) GARDEN CLINIC 

GROWING PLANTS UNDER ARTIFICIAL LIGHT 

(advance registration necessary) 

JANUARY 15 -FEBRUARY 16, EXHIBIT 

Monday - Friday 9:30 A.M. -4:30 P.M., 
Wednesday until 7:00 P.M. 

RARE PRINTS OF ARCTIC, ALPINE AND ROCK GARDEN PLANTS J 

389 Suburban Station Building 

JANUARY 23 (Tuesday) LECTURE 2:00 P.M.| 

FLOWERS OF THE TUNDRA 

Dr. William C. Steere 
(Sheraton Hotel) 

FEBRUARY 1 & 8 (repeat sessions) GARDEN CLINIC 
PLANNING THE HERBACEOUS BORDER 

(advance registration necessary) 

FEBRUARY 6 (Tuesday) MEMBERS' EVENING 7:30 P.M. 

CACTI 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur B. Wells 
389 Suburban Station Building 

FEBRUARY 13 & 17, GARDEN CLINIC 

HOME GREENHOUSE PRACTICE 

(advance registration necessary) 

FEBRUARY 20 (Tuesday) LECTURE 2:00 P.M. 

UNUSUAL PLANTS FOR HOME GARDENS 

Daniel J. Foley 
(Sheraton Hotel) 



THE PENNSYLVANIA 
HORTICULTURi^M 
SOCIEI^I 




VOL. 

i 

■ 


ill No. 

1 


iS 


FEBRUARY 1962 


1617 PENNSYLVANIA BOULEVARD 
PHILADELPHIA 3. PENNSYLVANIA 


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CLEMATIS 



Members of the Pennsylvania Horticultural 
Society who saw the superb clematis exhibited by 
the Conard-Pyle Company at the 1961 Philadelphia 
Flower Show will agree that clematis is, as William 
Robinson said many years ago, "The loveliest of all 
northern flowering vines." Clematis has a wide range 
of color, size, season of bloom, adaptability to many 
situations, and many are reliably hardy. Few flowers 
could be more beautiful or more rewarding to grow. 

Proper planting of clematis is of the utmost 
importance. They require a rich, well-drained loam 
generously loosened with sand, sifted coal ashes or 
peat moss. Dig a hole 2/4 ft. deep and 1>4 ft. wide 
and place several inches of rubble in the bottom for 
drainage. Set the crown or collar of the plant two 
inches below the soil surface and firm the soil well 
around the roots. 

Clematis grow best in a partially shaded situ- 
ation where they receive five or six hours of sunshine. 
Ideally, the bases of the plants should be shaded by 
low growing shrubs or other plants while the tops 
grow up into the sunlight. Always keep them mulched 
with buckwheat hulls, peat moss, leaf mold, or even 
a shallow-rooted ground cover. Manure, which was 
frowned upon a few years ago, is now considered 
beneficial, provided it is very well rotted ; fresh 
manure is definitely harmful. In England, flat stones 
or bricks are often used as a mulch to keep the soil 
moist and cool. It is most important to water clematis 
often in dry weather. 

In the early spring apply a light dressing of 
bone meal and follow it in several weeks with a 
generous sprinkling of wood ashes. In late autumn 
top-dress with a complete fertilizer. Do not apply 
fertilizer in summer, since it stimulates soft growth 
which is easily winter-killed. 

Clematis is susceptible to a stem rot, evidenced 
by the wilting of one or more stems. If this should 
occur, remove the affected part, cutting well below it, 
and spray the plant with Fermate or other fungicide. 

A good support should be provided as soon as 
the clematis is planted. Chicken wire tacked to a 
wall or fence is excellent because it provides a net- 
work of wire to which the leaf-tendrils can fasten 



themselves. Strips of the chicken wire a few inches 
wide can be used to help support the vine on lamp 
or porch posts and on open rail fences. As the vine 
develops the wire becomes hidden from view. Even 
though the tendency of the vine is to grow high, 
some of the growth can be trained in a downward 
direction to provide bloom near the base of the plant. 
When it is necessary to tie the vine in place to control 
direction of growth, always use a soft twine or string 
that will not cut the brittle stems. 

A zinc or other metal collar, five or six inches 
high and ten to twelve inches in diameter can be 
used to provide protection for the lower stems for 
the first few years until they become hard and woody. 
Push the metal collar two or three inches into the 
ground to steady it. 

PRUNING 

In the Delaware Valley clematis will often show 
green leaf buds as early as February. As soon as 
they are visible, pruning can begin. Newly planted 
clematis should be pinched back at once to induce 
more growth from the base. Pruning differs in the 
individual groups into which clematis are divided 
according to their blooming habits. Clematis x jack- 
manii*, C. viticella, and C. paniculata groups bloom on 
the new summer shoots and should be cut back 
early each season before growth starts to within one 
or two feet from the ground. 

The C. lanuginosa group blooms on the old wood 
on short lateral shoots and should be pruned spar- 
ingly, removing only the weak or straggling growth. 

VARIETIES 

From a bewildering number of the large-flowering 
hybrids, the following are the most adaptable and 
obtainable in eastern Pennsylvania and the Delaware 
Valley. 

C. lanuginosa group (Bloom on the old or ripened 
wood on short lateral shoots. Prune sparingly, re- 
moving only weak, straggling growth) : C. lanuginosa 
Candida - white with pale anthers; C. x henryi - white 
with dark anthers; C. x lawsoniana - violet, large, pro- 
lific, lovely; 'Nelly Moser' - pale pink, deeper pink 

(continued next page) 



LIFE MEMBERSHIP TOP PRIZE 
IN MEMBERSHIP CONTEST 

A Life Membership in The Pennsylvania Horti- 
cultural Society worth $250.00 will be awarded to 
the person who sells the greatest number of member- 
ships between February 15 and May 15, 1962. Ten 
additional prizes consisting of garden materials, 
supplies and books will go to the runners-up. If the 
top winner is already a Life Member of the Society, 
the prize may be presented by the winner to a son, 
daughter or to any other person. 

Only new or re-instated memberships will be 
accepted for scoring in the contest. Renewal of exist- 
ing memberships, of course, are not acceptable for 
contest purposes. Since several fcK-ms of membership 
are available, they will be scored as follows : 
Annual membership ($8) scored as 1 membership 
Family membership ($14) scored as 2 memberships 
Contributing membership ($25) scored as 3. 
Sustaining membership ($50) scored as 7. 

To enter the contest, write to Membership Con- 
test, care of The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society. 
389 Suburban Station Building, Phila. 3, Pa., for 
membership leaflets, blanks and instructions. One 
may enter at any time during the contest period, 
February 15 - May 15, inclusive, and memberships 
will be accepted as sold by the contestants. Mem- 
berships received after May 15 will not be counted. 

Unique illustration and succinct statement com- 
bine in the Society's new membership folder to im- 
press all who see it with the importance of belonging 
to The Pennsylvania Horticultural Societ}^ — it will 
help you to win ! 

CLEMATIS— {Cont'd) 

bars; "Ramona' - violet, prolific and beautiful; "Prins 
Hendrik' - blue violet, very large, late flowering. 
C. X jackmanii group (Bloom on new summer shoots. 
Cut back each spring to within one or two feet from 
ground.) ; C. x jackmanii - velvety purple, very prolific, 
reliable favorite ; 'Countess de Bouchaud' - mauve, 
smallish flower, late; "Mme. Baron Veillard' - lavender 
flowers, latest to bloom ; 'Mme. Edouard Andre' - wine 
red, low growing; "Airs. Cholmondelay' - wisteria blue, 
very prolific, early ; "The President' - plum violet, 
handsome flowers. 

C. viticella group (prune as C. x jackmanii group) : 
'Huldine' prolific, white -mauve bars in back, late; 
"Lady Betty Balfour' - rich purple, pure white centers; 
"Ville de Lyon' - shades of red. 

C. texensis (coccinea) group (prune as C. x jackmanii 
group : C. texensis - red, fleshy urn-shaped, dies to 
ground in winter. 

C. florida group (prune as C. lanuginosa group): 
"Duchess of Edinljurgh' - douljle white, early. 

* X indicates hybrid origin 



FEBRUARY LECTURE 

"Unusual Plants for Home Gardens" is the title 
of an illustrated lecture by Daniel J. Foley of Salem, 
Massachusetts, which will be presented by The 
Pennsylvania Horticultural Society at 2:00 P.M. on 
Tuesday, February 20, in the Penn Center Room of 
the Sheraton Hotel. Philadelphia. The lecture is open 
without charge to members, guests, and to the public. 

Mr. Foley is well known to members of the 
Society for his many appearances in this area and 
through his editorshi'p of HORTICULTURE maga- 
zine. His man}- books include Garden Flowers in Color; 
Vegetable Gardening in Color; Annuals for Your Garden; 
The Christmas Tree; Little Saints of Christmas; Christmas 
in the Good Old Days; and Ground Covers for Easier 
Gardening; all available in the Society's library. 

Mr. Foley will emphasize plants to grow ni i 
problem spots, particularly in shaded areas, and will! 
suggest many out-of-the-ordinary plants which help J 
to make interesting- gardens. 



MEMBERS' EVENINGS 

The Members' Evening program for Tuesday,] 
February 6, at 7:30 P.M., will feature Mr. and Mrs. 
Arthur B. Wells of Bryn Athyn. The topic is Cacti] 
and Succulents — Their Species, Varieties and Culture. 
Slides of many unusual sorts in bloom will be shown I 
and a special group of trade catalogs from cactus] 
specialists will be available for examintion. 

On Tuesday, March 6, Carlton B. Lees, Director] 
of the Society, will present an informal discussion 
and blackboard demonstration of how to go about] 
organizing the small home grounds. Special em- 1 
phasis will be placed upon analyzing the landscape J 
and developing it for function and beauty. 

For the convenience of members, the library] 
opens at 6:30 P.M. on Members' Evenings. 



FLOWER SHOW DEADLINES 

Monday, February 19 . . . last day for accepting] 

entries in the arrangement classes. 
Friday, February 23 . . . last day for accepting' 
entries in horticultural classes 
All entires must be received in writing in the 
office of the Society, by the above dates. 

Society Members To Be Admitted 
To Flower Show Early 

]\Iembers of the Pennsylvania Horticultural 
Society will be admitted to the Philadelphia Flower 
Show at noon on Sunday, March 11. This is one hour 
earlier than the ofificial opening hour to the general 
public and will give members a special quick preview 
before the show becomes crowded. 



CORRECTION 

We are sorry that among the members receiving 
awards in the exhibit of Paintings of Plants and 
Gardens the name of Mrs. A. H. Brecht was inad- 
vertently omitted in last month's NEWS. 



LIBRARY NEWS 



NEW BOOKS REVIEWED 

Italian gardens by Georgina IMasson. Harry N. 
Abrams, 1%1. 300 pp., illus. col. pis. $17.50. 

Italian garden design has spread throughout 
Europe and America in the past and books about 
these gardens have flourished with the ages. We 
are very grateful to Miss Masson, who spent 16 
years collecting data in Italy, and to the publish- 
ers for the logical format of this book. It covers 
gardens of The Marche, Veneto, and many gar- 
dens of Roman, Medieval, early Humanist and 
other periods. But most welcome is the list of 
flowers grown in Italian gardens and the bibli- 
ography. The 211 sharp and detailed photographs 
illustrate the splendor of Italian gardens. 

Southern California gardens; an illustrated history 

by Victoria Padilla. Univ. California Press, 1961. 
xviii, 359 pp., illus. 6 col. pis. $10.00. 

This book contains the concise history of horti- 
culture in Southern California, which began with 
the Franciscan fathers gardening in 1769, and 
continues through the Period of Industrialism 
(1935-1958) in the first part; the second and 
third parts contain the persons and plants which 
complete the story. Many pictures, and an ex- 
cellent bibliography, add to the reference value of 
the book. It is written for the layman rather than 
the student and published in cooperation with the 
Southern California Horticultural Institute. 

Plant marvels in miniature; a photographic study by 

C. Postma. John Day, 1961. 173 pp., illus. $12.50. 
To many people the magnified parts of plant 
structures are unknown. First the author reveals 
these with a slightly magnified photograph. In 
the following plates in each section (grasses, 
flowers, plant hairs, stems, parasites, etc.) the 
magnification is increased up to 3000 times. Each 
of the 77 photographs is carefully explained for 
the layman (such as the mechanism of the sting- 
ing nettle), and the student of botany will want 
to pursue the subject further. The photographer 
will find the photographic techniques interesting. 
Truly a book of pleasure. 

Weed control: as a science by Glenn C. Klingman 
with ed. assistance of L. J. Noordhoflf. John 
Wiley, 1961. viii, 421 pp., illus. $8.50. 

This book, written primarily for classroom 
instruction, discusses new and scientific aspects 
of chemical weed control since the discovery of 
2,4-D. The physical properties and uses of 25 
new weed control chemicals are explained. The 
home owner will find the chapter on weed control 
for ornamentals and turf helpful. The adventure- 
some or experimental gardener may want to try 



some of the chemical weed control methods on 
vegetable plots, (rev. by G.D.L.) 

Concise gardening encyclopedia by Bernard W. 
Bishop. Philosophical Library, 1961. 190 pp., 
illus. 16 pis. $3.75. 

This British general gardening book is the 
compilation of answers to questions the author 
has been asked over the years on flowers, fruits 
and vegetables. 

Woody plants in winter by Earl L. Core and Nellie 
P. Amnions. Boxwood, 1958. vi, 318 pp., illus., 
paper cover. $2.75. 

This is a very usable book for the identification 
of plants during the dormant season. It contains 
simplified keys to genera and species of common 
trees and shrubs in Northeastern United States 
and Southeastern Canada, line drawings, descrip- 
tions, bibliography, glossary and index. 

Flower arrangement the American way by lone 
Richardson. Pelican Publ. Co., 1960. 167 pp., 
illus. $6.95. 

Analyses of flower arrangement, design and 
color principle, and equipment for arranging 
flowers are included in this book. The author is 
a nationally known flower arranger. 

GIFTS FROM MEMBERS 

Our garden heritag'e; articles from the Bulletin of the 
Garden Club of America ed. by Alice Sloane 
Anderson. Dodd, Mead & Co., 1961. xviii, 622 pp., 
12 cols. pis. 

Gift from Mrs. Charles Piatt, Sr. This is a 
marvelous collection of miscellaneous articles for 
gardeners (many were written by members of 
our Society such as Mrs. Piatt, John C. Wister, 
Mrs. E. F. Rivinus, Mrs. E. M. Cheston and 
others). The book is handsomely illustrated with 
reproductions of 18th and 19th century botanical 
plates. 

Flowers-by-wire; the story of the Florists' Telegraph 
Delivery Association by Marc Williams. Mercury 
House, 1960. 430 pp., 48 pis. 

Gift from Mrs. Richard D. Wood, Jr. The 50 
year history of this international organization's 
story of the distribution of fresh flowers is told 
in this book. 

American flower garden directory 3d ed. by Robert 
Buist, 1845. Gift from Miss Harriet E. Worrell. 
A collection of horticultural and botanical 
prints for study and exhibition has been started 
by the Society. The first generous contribution is 
from Mrs. Edward M. Cheston and contains fine 
colored engravings from Redoute's Lei liliacees. 



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GARDEN CLINICS 

FEBRUARY 1 & 8 (Thursdays) 10:30 A.M. 

389 Suburban Station Building 

PLANNING THE HERBACEOUS BORDER 

Martha Ludes Garra 
This is a repeat of a three-part clinic devoted to 
planning for long season color. 

FEBRUARY 13 & 17 (Tuesday) 7:00 P.M. 

(Saturday) 2:00 P.M. 

HOME GREENHOUSE PRACTICE AND DEMONSTRATION 

Ernesta Drinker Ballard 
The first session takes place in the rooms of the 
Society and the second in Chestnut Hill. 

MARCH 27 (Tuesday) 7:00 P.M. 

STEPS, PATHS, WALLS, & TERRACES 

Mrs. Garra 
Charts and slides will be used to illustrate the 
construction of these garden complements. 

Register 6v using the clip-out coupon. Please enclose check and 
mail to /i89 Suburban Station. Phila. -H. Registrations accepted in the 
order received; confirmation by return post card. 



GARDEN CLINIC REGISTRATION 

Please register me for the Garden Clinic : 

□ February 1 & 8 (third session to be 
scheduled for June) PLANNING THE 
HERBACEOUS BORDER 

($6.00 per member) 

□ February 13 & 17 HOME 
GREENHOUSE PRACTICE 
($4.00 per member) 

n March 27 STEPS, PATHS, WALLS 
AND TERRACES 
($2.00 per member) 



Name 



Address 

Telephone 



DATES To Mark On Your CALENDAR 

JANUARY 15 -FEBRUARY 16, EXHIBIT 

Monday -Friday 9:30 A.M. -4:30 P.M. 

Wednesday until 7:00 P.M. 

RARE PRINTS OF ARCTIC, ALPINE AND ROCK GARDEN PLANTS 

389 Suburban Station Building 

FEBRUARY 1 & 8 GARDEN CLINIC 10:30 A.M. 

PLANNING THE HERBACEOUS BORDER 

(advance registration necessary) 

FEBRUARY 6 (Tuesday) MEMBERS' EVENING 7:30 P.M. 

CACTI 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur B. Wells 
389 Suburban Station Building 

FEBRUARY 13 8. 17, GARDEN CLINIC 

HOME GREENHOUSE PRACTICE 

(advance registration necessary) 

FEBRUARY 19-23, EXHIBIT - EVERGREENS FOR GARDENS 

Philadelphia National Bank Windows 

FEBRUARY 20 (Tuesday) LECTURE 2:00 P.M. 

UNUSUAL PLANTS FOR HOME GARDENS 

Daniel J. Foley 
(Sheraton Hotel) 

MARCH 6 (Tuesday) MEMBERS' EVENING 7:30 P.M. 

ORGANIZING YOUR PROPERTY 

Carlton B. Lees 
389 Suburban Station Building 

MARCH 11 17 PHILADELPHIA FLOWER SHOW 

Sunday 1 P.M. - 10 P.M. 

(Members' preview, 12 noon) 

Monday - Saturday 9 A.M. - 10 P.M. 

Trade & Convention Center 

MARCH 19 (Monday) TOUR 2:00 P.M. 

W. Atlee Burpee Co. 

Hunting Park Ave. at 18th St., Philadelphia 

MARCH 27 (Tuesday) GARDEN CLINIC 7-9 P.M. 

STEPS, PATHS, WALLS AND TERRACES 

(advance registration necessary) 



THE PENNSYLVANIA 

HORTICULTURAL 

SOCIETY 


1^^^ 


VOL III No. 

U 


Is 


MARCH 


!962 


■ 1617 PENNSYLVANIA BOULEVARD 

■ PHILADELPHIA 3. PENNSYLVANIA 


^^^h^^ MARCJ^J^I^^H 


5 


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CAMELLIAS FOR THE DELAWARE VALLEY 



The innate tendency of gardeners to try to grow 
plant varieties that they are told will not do well 
in their climate has been the source of many wonder- 
ful discoveries. Such is the case of Camellia japonica, 
the spring blooming camellia. A few years ago it was 
grown and flowered outdoors in Yonkers, N. Y. for 
the first time. Although still very much in the experi- 
mental stage, the facts have been established that 
varieties of Camellia japonica vary in hardiness and 
that the plant itself is more tolerant of low tempera- 
tures (-15°F.) than are the flower buds (10°F.). Many 
northern gardeners are enjoying their own camellia 
blossoms in at least four years out of five. Older, 
well established plants, incidentally, have greater 
resistance to cold than very young, recently planted 
ones. It appears that it takes a plant as much as two 
to three years to adjust its flowering date to the 
late spring season in the north. 

Location is very important. Camellias should be 
protected from the sweep of wind. They also should 
be protected from the morning sun in winter, because 
the fast thawing of frozen tissues damages flower 
buds. Some light, but not necessarily direct sunlight, 
is necessary for bud formation, and protection from 
the hottest sun will produce lush, dark green foliage. 
A western or northern exposure, with wind protection, 
is about ideal, unless you happen to have a space 
lightlv shaded by high-branched evergreens. 
CULTURE 

Camellias require a well drained, acid soil con- 
taining plenty of organic matter. Plant in the spring 
and be sure to set them at the same depth at which 
they were growing in the nursery. After the first 
year, feed with a balanced, acid, organic fertilizer, 
such as one used for hollies, rhododendrons and 
azaleas, in very late fall (late November, early Decem- 
ber), in early spring and, a third time, in June. Do 
not feed later than June since this could stimulate 
late growth which would not be mature enough to 
withstand low temperatures. 

Probably the most important factor in the suc- 
cessful culture of camellias is an adequate water 
; supply, especially in June and July when flower buds 
■ are forming. It is wise to mulch well with pine 



needles to conserve moisture. In September, allow 
the plants to remain on the dry side to encourage 
hardening of the stems and foliage. During the winter 
of 1960-61, camellias which were sprayed with Wilt- 
pruf appear to have suft'ered less damage than those 
which were not sprayed. Apply Wilt-pruf in Novem- 
ber and again in February when air temperatures 
are above freezing. 

Prune camellias after blooming in May. Remove 
weak, inside branches to provide good air circulation, 
and shape the plants to help them withstand snow 
load in winter. Where buds form in clusters, remove 
all but one to improve the size and quality of the 
flowers. 
VARIETIES 

Generally speaking, varieties which flower from 
mid to late season are recommended, and the list of 
those proving to be hardy is growing each year. Of 
the more than six hundred in cultivation, the follow- 
ing varieties do well in the Delaware Valley area. 

C. japonica varieties: 'Mathotiana', 'Blood of 
China' (syn. 'Victor Emmanuel') and 'Elegans' (syn. 
'Chandler') are red ; "Marjorie Magnificent', 'Rev. John 
G. Drayton'. 'Kumasaka' (syn. 'Lady Marion') and 
"Bernice Boddy'* are pink; 'Leucantha', white; and 
the variegated varieties are 'Tricolor' (syn. 'Siebold'), 
'Herme', 'Dr. Tinsley'*, 'Ville de Nantes' and the 
variegated form of 'Elegans'. 

It is important that the spring blooming C. 
japonica should be distinguished from the fall bloom- 
ing C. sasanqua. The fall blooming camellias generally 
produce smaller flowers but in greater profusion. 
Varieties which bloom early enough to escape hard 
frosts should be chosen since C. sasanqua buds are 
killed at temperatures below 18°F. The plants are 
hardy to 0°F., and although occasionally damaged by 
low temperature, they recover quickly the following 
season. An eastern exposure is recommended for 
C. sasanqua. 

C. sasanqua varieties: 'Jean May', light pink; 
'Rosea' and 'Sparkling Burgandy', deep pink; 'Setsu- 
gekka', white. 

(• Varieties which survived the severe 1960-61 winter particularly well). 

(continued next page) 



MOLE CONTROL 

Many questions are received from members each 
year on the suljject of controlling moles. While 
Chlordane is a standard treatment, especially for turf 
areas where it kills the grubs upon which the moles 
feed, several members view with alarm the possibility 
of harming feeding robins. With this in mind, the 
following, from the American Horticultural Society 
Gardeners Forum (September 1961) is reprinted: 

"In the August 1958 issue of the AHS Gardeners 
Forum there was an article, "Make War on the Pesky 
Moles". Some remedies were given such as Dieldrin, 
Chlordane, trapping, etc., but the method used by 
many of us was not mentioned. This is the planting 
of Euphorbia lathyrus in various spots in the garden. 
It is a hardy biennial, (seeds itself) grows to about 
two feet in height, bears long, narrow, blue-green, 
symmetrically arranged leaves. It has been recom- 
mended highly as a repellant, and it was stated that 
moles would not go within sixty feet of it as the 
roots are alleged to give oflf a toxic secretion. The 
plant is decorative and I have planted and have seen 
it planted among many kinds of plants. I have had no 
trouble with moles since having this euphorbia in 
my garden, but did find two dead moles. A friend 
stated that she found seven dead moles. At least a 
half dozen gardens where Euphorbia lathyrus is planted 
among perennial plants report they now have no 
trouble with moles." 

This euphorljia, often called Mole-plant, is listed 
in the catalog of the Harry E. Saier Seed Co., 
Diamondule, Mich., at 30c per packet. 



IMPORTANT 

If you are attending the special members' 
])review of the Philadelphia Flower Show at 
noon, Sunday, March 11th . . . 

1. Purchase guest tickets in advance (on sale 
in the Society office through March 9th). 
Guests will be admitted if accompanied 
by a member. 

2. Use # 1 door ^ this door is below street 
level on the Convention Avenue side of 
Exhibition Hall. It can be reached from 
the rear (south) parking lot or from the 
outdoor stairway at the north end of 
Exhibition Hall. 



CAMELLIAS— (cont'd) 

Photographs, in color, of most of the C. japonica 
varieties recommended above may be seen in H. 
Harold Hume's Camellias in America, (McFarland, 
1955). Additional hardiness data may be found in the 
American CanieUia Yearbook 1961 and in jjreceding 
issues. .Ml are available in the Horticultural Society 
library. 



SPRING LUNCHEON 

The 1962 Spring Luncheon will be held in the 
Ball Room of the Bellevue-Stratford Hotel, Tuesday, 
March 13, 12:30 P.M. Along with the Flower Show, 
this event really ushers Spring into Philadelphia. 
Ruth McVaugh Allen will whet our appetities for 
exploring the wilds of fields, forests and gardens with 
her superb slides, and the Horticultural Society's Cer- 
tificates of Merit will be presented to individuals 
and/orinstitutions for their outstanding contributions 
to horticulture. If you haven't sent in your reservation 
. . . may we suggest that you do so at once? 



BURPEE TOUR 

Ever wonder how all those millions of marigold, 
zinnia and petunia seeds are handled before they 
finally arrive, attractively packaged, in your mailbox? 
On Monday, March 19, 2:00 P.M., members of the 
Horticultural Society will have an opportunity to see 
and hear the inside story at the W. Atlee Burpee Co. 
Among the attractions are the seed storage warehouse, 
laboratory where germination tests are carried out, 
the order processing system and the papering depart- 
ment where seeds are put in packets and cans. 

The Burpee Co. is located at Hunting Park Ave. 
and 18th Street, Philadelphia. Members are requested 
to use the main entrance at 4015 Clarissa Street, 
where parking is usually available. 



MEMBERS' EVENING 

Carlton B. Lees, Director of the Horticultural 
-Society, will discuss the organization of small proper- 
ties on Tuesday, March 6, 7 :30 P. M. He will demon- 
strate, diagramatically, how privacy is achieved, how 
unwanted views are screened out, how important 
views are brought into focus, how interest is created 
within small space, and other landscape problems. 
Mr. Lees will use slides, the blackboard and original 
drawings from his book Budget Landscaping to illustrate 
])oints discussed. (These drawings will be on display 
in the library during March.) 

Selecting woody plants for the small garden will 
be the topic for the April session. Miss Mary O. 
Milton, staff Horticulturist, will evaluate trees, shrubs 
and woody vines, especially as they are suited to 
small gardens. 

The library opens at 6:30 P.M. on the above 
dates for the convenience of Members. 



CRABAPPLES TO BE SHOWN 

Ten of the best flowering crabapples selected by 
experts as reported in the April 1961 NEWS, will be 
exhibited in the Society section of the Philadeli)hia 
Flower Show ... Be sure to see them. 



LIBRARY NEWS 



I 



i 



BORROW LIBRARY 
REQUESTS RECEIVED 

NEW BOOKS REVIEWED 

Rhododendrons of the world; and how to grow them 
by David G. Leach. Illus. by Edmond Amateis 
and Don Miller. Charles Scribner's Sons, 1961. 
544 pp., 16 pis., illus. $25.00. 

This most comprehensive work on rhododen- 
drons is written for the amateur gardener, the 
professional grower and the rhododendron student. 
It covers all phases of growing, history and dis- 
tribution, plant anatomy, descriptions of 148 spe- 
cies, hybrids and breeding, forcing, lists of hybrids 
and parentage, hybridists, introducers, American 
and European nurseries, species with their series 
and subseries, affiliations and ratings, obsolete 
and invalid names, bibliography and a phylo- 
genetic chart in color. In 1945, Mr. Leach began 
hybridizing rhododendrons for increased hardiness 
in his gardens in northwestern Pennsylvania. Gar- 
deners are excited by the exuberant color of 
rhododendrons in spring ; readers will find the 
contents of this book rewarding in any season. 

Your guide to Florida landscape plants by John V. 
Watkins. Univ. Florida Press, 1961. xiii, 293 pp., 
illus. $6.50. 

Professor \\'atkins, well known authority on 
tropical horticulture, writes a very easy-to-use 
guide to palms, trees, shrubs and vines with 
supplements on pest control, terminology, plants 
for special situations and toxic plants. The ar- 
rangement of plants follows Bailey's Manual of 
Cultivated Plants. 

The perennial border and rock garden by Roscoe A. 
Fillmore. Ryerson Press, 1961. xi, 291 pp., illus. 
$5.50. 

Although written by an experienced nursery- 
man for gardening in Canada, this guide provides 
useful ideas to gardeners in the Delaware Valley 
area. Besides writing about his own experiences, 
the author has drawn from those of other nursery- 
men, officials of the Canadian Experimental Farms 
and other experts. Also included is a chapter on 
the rock gardens at Banff, Alberta, by G. H. L. 
Dempster. 

Spices and herbs around the world by Elizabeth S. 
Hayes, illus. by J. M. Yeatts. Doubleday, 1961. 
266 pp. $5.95. 

Economic botany for the layman. Given for 
each spice or herb is its country of origin, methods 
of cultivation, uses and recipes. In separate chap- 
ters is information on gardening design, growing 
herbs and rules for judging herb exhibits. 

The kitchen garden book l)y Stringfellow Rarr and 
Stella Standard. Dolphin Books. 1961. 480 pp. 
$1.45. 



BOOKS BY MAIL; 
BY PHONE OR MAIL. 

This paper back edition (cloth edition was first 
published in 1956) tells how to grow 32 garden 
vegetables and gives over 500 ways to cook and 
serve them. 
Circumpolar arctic flora by Nicholas Polunin. Oxford 
Univ. Press, 1959. xxviii, 517 pp., illus. $20.00. 

Dr. Polunin spent nearly 20 years of intensive 
study in preparation of this manual. It contains 
descriptions and illustrations of 892 species of 
vascular plants. 

Lichen handbook; a guide to the lichens of eastern 
North America by Mason E. Hale. Smithsonian 
Institution, 1961. x, 178pp., 20 pis. $4.00. 

This modern semipopular treatment of lichens 
fills a neglected gap in plant world literature. 

The molds and man; an introduction to the fung^ 
2d ed. by Clyde M. Christensen. Univ. Minnesota 
Press, 1961. viii, 238 pp., illus. $1.75 paper; $4.75 
cloth. 

Dr. Christensen writes in a popular style about 
the fungi. Although the larger fungi (mushrooms) 
have been recognized for thousands of years, only 
recently has this group of plants become signifi- 
cantly understood: the process of decay, beneficial 
uses in medicine and agriculture, the fundamental 
studies on the nature of sex, and biological war- 
fare. This is the best introductory book today for 
anyone who wants to know more about the fungi. 

NEW BOOKS LISTED 

The green thumb handbook by George Abraham. 

Prentice-Hall, 1961. viii, 344 pp., illus. $4.95. 
The vegetable garden displayed; with nearly three 

hundred photographs rev. ed. by The Royal 

Horticultural Society, 1961. 128pp., illus. 
Horticultural dictionary in eight languages ed. by 

J. Nijdam. Interscience Publ., 1961. 504 pp., $7.50. 
Prepared under the auspices of the Ministry of 

Agriculture and Fisheries, The Netherlands. 
The American camellia yearbook 1961. 
The lily yearbook of the North American Lily Society 

No. 14, 1961. 

From the Royal Horticultural Society: The 
daflfodil and tulip yearbook 1962, No. 27; The 
rhododendron and camellia yearbook 1962, No. 16; 
and Classified list and international register of 
daffodil names 1961. 

Three popular handbooks published recently by 
Penguin Books in conjunction and collaboration 
with The Royal Horticultural Society are: 
Chrysanthemums by Edward T. Thistlethwaite, 
Dahlias by Stuart Ogg, and Delphiniums by 
Ronald Parrett. 





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GARDEN CLINICS 

MARCH 27 (Tuesday) 7:00 P.M. 

STEPS, PATHS, WALLS, & TERRACES 

389 Suburban Station Building 

Martha Ludes Garra 
Charts and slides will be used to illustrate the 
construction of these garden complements. 
APRIL 14 (Saturday) Chestnut Hill 2:00 P.M. 

ESPALIERS 

Ernesta Drinker Ballard 
Each member will be supervised in pruning and 
training a plant to be taken home and planted in his 
or her own garden. 

APRIL 17 (Thursday) Ambler 10:30 A.M. 

PLANNING FOR EASY MAINTENANCE 

Mrs. Garra 
Mrs. Garra's own garden will be used to demon- 
strate garden plans, ground covers, mulches, fertilizers, 
sprays, and other topics for easier garden maintenance. 

Register by using the clip-out coupon. Please enclose check and 
mail to -^89 Suburban Station. Phila. .?. Registrations accepted in the 
order received: confirmation by return post card. 



GARDEN CLINIC REGISTRATION 

Please register me for the Garden Clinic : 
n March 27 STEPS. PATHS, WALLS 
AND TERRACES 
($2.00 per member) 

n April 14 ESPALIERS 
($2.00 per member) 

n April 17 PLANNING FOR 
EASY MAINTENANCE 
($2.00 per member) 

Name 



Address 

Telephone 



DATES To Mark On Your CALENDAR 

MARCH 6 (Tuesdav) MEMBERS' EVENING 7:30 P.M. 

ORGANIZING YOUR PROPERTY 

Carlton B. Lees 
389 Suburban Station Building 

MARCH 11-17 PHILADELPHIA FLOWER SHOW 

Sunday 1:00 P.M. -7:00 P.M. 

(Members' preview, 12 noon) 

Monday - Saturday 9:00 A.M. -10:00 P.M. 

Trade & Convention Center 

MARCH 13 (Tuesday) SPRING LUNCHEON 12:30 P.M. 
Bellevue-Stratford Hotel 

MARCH 19 (Monday) TOUR 2:00 P.M. 

W. Atlee Burpee Co. 

Hunting Park Ave. at 18th St., Philadelphia 

MARCH 27 (Tuesday) GARDEN CLINIC 7-9 P.M. 

STEPS, PATHS, WALLS AND TERRACES 

(advance registration necessary) 

APRIL 3 (Tuesday) MEMBERS' EVENING 7:30 P.M. 

SELECTING PLANT MATERIALS 

Mary O. Milton 
389 Suburban Station Building 

APRIL 12 13 DAFFODIL JUDGING SCHOOL AND SYMPOSIUM 

Swarthmore, Pa. 

APRIL 14 (Saturday) GARDEN CLINIC 2:00 P.M. 

ESPALIERS 

(advance registration necessary) 

APRIL 17 (Thursday) GARDEN CLINIC 10:30 A.M. 

PLANNING FOR EASY MAINTENANCE 

(advance registration necessary) 
APRIL 18-19 DAFFODIL SHOW 

Philadelphia National Bank Building 
Broad and Chestnut Streets 
APRIL 28 (Saturday) PLANT EXCHANGE 

Chestnut Hill 
APRIL 29 (Sunday) JOHN BARTRAM DAY 
Bartram's Gardens 



THE PENNSVL.VANI. 
HORTICULTURAL 



SOCIETY 



1617 PENNSYLVANIA BOULEVARD 
PHILADELPHIA 3. PENNSYLVANIA 




VOL. Ill No. 4 



APRIL 1962 



THE PENNSYLVANIA HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

LAWN PROGRAM 



The lawn care program outlined here is the result 
of the work of several members of The Pennsylvania 
Horticultural Society who are involved in lawn prob- 
lems through research, extension work, and consulting 
and business services. The down to earth recommen- 
dations are for the beginner and for the home owner 
who wishes to improve his present lawn. For the 
more advanced, some of the steps outlined may not 
need repeating, depending on his or her awareness 
of lawn needs and success with past programs. 

SOIL TEST 

The first step to intelligent lawn care calls for a 
complete soil test to determine basic needs. This 
you can obtain by sending a dollar to your local 
County Agent and requesting a lawn test mailing kit. 
With it you will receive explicit instructions for col- 
lecting soil samples, and you will also be required to 
answer several questions which will help in determin- 
ing your soil needs in so far as nutrients and organic 
material are concerned. 

The acid-alkaline balance of your soil is so im- 
portant that it cannot be overemphasized, so if you 
do nothing else, be sure to have pH tests. In the 
range of pH 6.0 - 7.0 the various chemical elements 
(whether of organic or inorganic origin) break down 
into forms which can be absorbed by grass roots ; if 
too low or too high the fertilizer applied does little 
good. To neglect determining the pH is foolish be- 
cause you may be wasting fertilizer, time, energy and 
money. 

Many garden supply dealers are prepared to make 
accurate pH tests. It is a good idea to take along 
two or three plugs from your lawn — these should 
be about three inches in diameter and three inches 
deep — enough to enable him to examine the physical 
condition of the soil. Remember, too. that soil condi- 
tions vary from one section of the lawn to another, 
so be sure to gather and mark samples from various 
areas. If differences are great, treatments may be 
called for which vary accordingly. 



Apply agricultural limestone as soon as possible 
if the soil tests indicate a pH 6.0 or lower. This can 
be done at any time during the year. (Do not use 
hydrated lime.) Continue to check the pH level each 
year, especially if it has been necessary to add lime- 
stone to overcome excess acidity. 

FERTILIZER 

Use a 10-6-4 fertilizer in which at least 50% of the 
nitrogen is organic, either natural or ureaform, unless 
deficiencies are found and specific recommendations 
are made accordingly in a complete lawn test. Apply 
twenty pounds per 1,000 square feet twice a year, 
in early April and early September. 

MOWING 

Mow your lawn when it is needed. This means 
that you can't leave it as a once-a-week, Saturday 
morning job. In late spring a healthy lawn may need 
mowing twice a week or even three times. As a gen- 
eral rule, mow often enough so that you never cut 
off more than one inch of growth. The remaining 
grass will be green and the clippings small enough to 
filter down to the soil and make a good mulch. (If 
you have Merion Kentucky Bluegrass remove all 
clippings by using a catcher on your mower). 

Set your lawn mower at 1^ inches minimum 
height, and mow at this height spring, summer and 
fall. Don't forget to keep on mowing in autumn 
if it is needed, and be sure your lawn mower is sharp. 
This is particularly critical when a rotary mower 
is used. If you use a rotary and your lawn some- 
times seems to have a greyish or straw colored 
cast, you will find upon close examination that the 
grass blades are being torn off" instead of cut. The 
bruised, ragged edges on the remaining portions are 
due to a dull blade. While rotary mowers are unex- 
celled for country situations, rough places and 
meadow-like turf, experts generally ])refer reel type 
mowers for lawns (and they are safer, too). 

(Cont'd next page) 



I 



LAWN CARE PROGRAM 

(Cont'd from page one) 

ROLLING 

There is no good reason for rolling an established 
lawn in the Greater Delaware \'alley area. The slight 
heaving due to late winter freezing and thawing 
aerates the soil and improves its structure. To roll, 
even with a very light roller, is to nullify this effect 
and may contribute to the problem of soil compaction. 
Under no circumstances should a power roller be 
used on an established lawn. 

WATERING 

It is better not to water at all than to water 
frequently and shallowly. Even when bluegrasses 
(the basic grass of most northern lawns) turn brown 
from lack of water, the roots withstand severe drought 
and new growth appears soon after the first rain. On 
the other hand, frequent, shallow watering encourages 
the germination of crabgrass seeds, increases the 
probability of disease on bluegrasses and stimulates 
the growth of bentgrasses. The latter have come to 
be regarded as undesirable in ordinary home lawns 
because they are highly susceptible to disease and 
will not withstand even slight drought. 

If you must water, be sure that it is needed : 
thick turf can go for a long period without rain. Then 
apply enough water to penetrate to a depth of 6 inches. 
This takes hours ; it is not a hose-in-hand operation. 
Make sure you have a good sprinkler (or even several 
sprinklers) and that it distributes water evenly. 

The inability to maintain grass under maples and 
other shallow rooted trees is more often due to lack 
of water than shade. Because tree roots absorb tre- 
mendous quantities of moisture from the soil, it is 
necessary to water very frequently to maintain any 
grass at all and even then it is often necessary to 
sow temporary grasses such as redtop, perennial rye- 
grass or Italian ryegrass (the last two are often sold 
as domestic ryegrass). 

CONTROL OF BROADLEAF WEEDS 

Weeds, such as plantain, dandelion and chick- 
weed are classed as broadleaf weeds as distinguished 
from the weed grasses such as crabgrass, foxtail, 
quackgrass and Muhlenbergia. 

If your lawn has broadleaf weeds generally dis- 
tributed throughout, use 2,4-D, 2,4,5-T, 2,4,5-TP or a 
combination of two of these. While the materials are 
manufactured under a variety of trade names in both 
liquid and dry forms (in which the chemical is carried 
on an inert material such as vermiculite), the dry 



form has the advantage of being ready to use and 
can be applied with a spreader. It also reduces the ' 
possibility of damaging nearby shrubs and other 
plants. 

If your lawn is so weedy that reseeding will be 
necessary, apply a broadleaf weed killer in mid-August 
so you can sow grass seed in early September. If 
you prefer to sow seed in spring, when earliness is J, 
a critical factor, do so in early April and then wait 1' 
until after the second mowing to make a general 
application of weed killer. 

In a well established lawn apply these materials 
any time during the growing season. There is some . 
indication that a late summer application is best since I 
it not only kills the perennial weeds but destroys the 
newly ripened seeds of both annual and perennial 
weeds. In any case always apply these materials 
according to directions. The amount used per given 
area is of extreme importance. 



CRABGRASS CONTROL 

Crabgrass control chemicals fall into two cata- 
gories : pre-emergence (applied before crabgrass ap- 
pears) and post-emergence (applied when crabgrass 
is visible). The newer pre-emergence materials, which 
have proved to be especially well adapted to Delaware 
Valley conditions, consistantly provide about 70-80% 
control of crabgrass. They are dacthal, zytron and 
tri-calcium arsenate. With these materials, combined 
with good lawn management as already outlined, 
you can expect to attain nearly complete control. In 
no case should you expect the job to be done by 
chemicals alone, since a vigorous turf is the vital first 
step in eliminating this annual weed. 

If your lawn is 50% or more permanent grasses, 
apply a pre-emergence material in March or very early 
April. This has a long term effect and will continue 
to destroy germinating crabgrass seed over a period 
of several weeks. If you feel that you must do some 
seeding in spring to fill in sparse areas, do it in very 
early April; then apply a new material, (calcium- 
propyl-arsonate) in May. This chemical has both 
pre- and post-emergence effect on crabgrass and will 
not destroy the new, desirable grasses. 

To complement the pre-emergence materials and 
to gain nearly complete eradication of crabgrass, it 
also is necessary to use a post-emergence chemical. 
These are generally organic arsenicals with long chem- 
ical names which have been abbreviated as DMA, 
DSMA, dimet, sodar, AMA and Calar. Get into the 
habit of examining the lawn as you mow, learn to 
recognize the crabgrass plants while still small. 
Make the first application of post-emergence material 

(Cont'd next page) 



i 



I 



DAFFODIL JUDGING SCHOOL 
AND SYMPOSIUM 

A special Daffodil Judging School and Symposium 
is scheduled for April 12-13 at the Friends Meeting 
House, Swarthmore College Campus, Swarthmorc, 
Pa. The event is co-sponsored by the Northeast 
Region of The American Daffodil Society, the Scott 
Foundation of Swarthmore College and The Pennsyl- 
vania Horticultural Society. Reservations must be 
made in advance ; a program for both events and 
registration information are available by writing or 
telephoning to the Horticultural Society (LO 3-8352). 
Topics included in the two-day program are : daffodil 
classification, judging characteristics, identification and 
point scoring, culture and health, the newest daffodils 
and a period for questions and discussion. 



DAFFODIL SHOW SCHEDULES AVAILABLE 

The annual Daffodil Show of The Pennsylvania 
Horticultural Society is scheduled for April 18-19. 
in the Philadelphia National Bank, Broad and Chest- 
nut Streets, Philadelphia. Show hours are 1 :00 P.M.- 
7:30 P.M., on Wednesday, 9:30 A.M. -3:30 P.M., 
Thursday. This show is accredited by the American 
Daffodil Society. 

]\Iembers of the Society who have exhibited in 
past daffodil shows will receive this year's show 
schedule automatically ; others may obtain a copy by 
writing or telephoning to the Society office. 



A TELEPHONE SUGGESTION 

A new telephone system has been installed in the 
offices and library of the Horticultural Society which 
is much more effective and provides more flexibility 
than the one replaced. Since the great number of 
calls received may keep telephones in constant use, 
we ask that you follow these suggestions : 

1. Please telephone before noon for answers to 
horticultural questions. 

2. Please indicate the purpose of your call by asking 
for the library, the Membership Secretary, or by 
stating that you have a horticultural question, 
a flower show question, etc. In this manner the 
call will be routed directly to the person handling 
the information requested. Certain questions can 
be answered by more than one person, so stating 
the purpose of your call will help to provide you 
with an answer more quickly. 



MEMBERS INVITED TO 
JOHN BARTRAM DAY 

Members of The Pennsylvania Horticultural 
Society will be the guests of the John Bartram Asso- 
ciation at Bartram's Garden on Sunday, April 29, 
3:00-5:00 P. M. 

S])ecial ])oints of interest throughout the house 
and garden will be marked and meml^ers of the Asso- 



ciation will be present to serve as guides. At 4:00 
P. M. Carlton B. Lees, Director of the Horticultural 
Society will read short excerpts from the letters of 
John Bartram and Peter Collinson which provide a 
unique insight to the life of one of America's most 
important botanists. Refreshments will be served, 
and small potted Franklinia trees will be on sale for 
the benefit of the Bartram Association. 

The John Bartram Association has made con- 
sideral)le progress in furnishing the house according 
to the ])eriod in which the botanist occupied it. Several 
garden cluljs have assisted with this project and the 
-Association is anxious to restore as much of this 
garden as possible. 

To reach Bartram's Garden, take first left turn 
from University Avenue exit of Schuykill Expressway. 
Cross bridge, turn right at first light on to Grays Ferry 
Road. Cross another bridge, bear left at next light. 
Drive one block to 49th Street. Turn left and follow 
trolley tracks until you cross railroad bridge (the 
tracks turn from 49th St. on to Elmwood Ave.) Turn 
sharp left immediately to drive into Bartram's Garden. 



MEMBERS' EVENING 

The members' evening on the organization of 
small properties which was to have taken place on 
Tuesday, March 6, was cancelled because of weather 
conditions. Carlton B. Lees, Director of the Society 
will present this topic April 3. He will demonstrate, 
diagramatically, how to deal with landscape prob- 
lems. Slides and drawings will be used to illustrate 
the analysis and solution of problems discussed. 

Miss Mary O. Milton, staff Horticulturist, will 
discuss the selection of woody plants for small gardens 
for the members' evening on Tuesday, May 1. 

Programs start at 7:30 P.M., the library opens 
at 6:30 P.M., on these dates for the convenience of 
members. 



PLANT EXCHANGE 

The annual plant exchange of The Pennsylvania 
Horticultural Society will be held Saturday, April 28, 
in the barn at the Frederic Ballard, Jr. residence, 
Northwestern Ave. and Thomas Rd., Chestnut Hill. 

All plants for exchange must be received 
before 9:30 A.M. 

Bartering begins at 10:00 A.M. 
More emphasis will be placed on quality this year. 
All unlabeled or questionable plants will go into a 
Bargain Basement ; anyone bringing in only Bargain 
Basement material will be able to trade only there. 
In order to l)e eligible for bartering in the Connois- 
seur's Corner you must provide quality plants for 
that department. Plants of good quality but not of 
unusual merit will earn points for "main floor" trading. 



LAWN CARE PROGRAM 

(Cont'd from page one) 

ROLLING 

There is no good reason for rolling an established 
lawn in the Greater Delaware X'alley area. The slight 
heaving due to late winter freezing and thawing 
aerates the soil and improves its structure. To roll, 
even with a very light roller, is to nullify this effect 
and may contribute to the i)rol)lem of soil compaction. 
Under no circumstances should a power roller be 
used on an established lawn. 

WATERING 

It is better not to water at all than to water 
frequently and shallowly. Even when bluegrasses 
(the basic grass of most northern lawns) turn brown 
from lack of water, the roots withstand severe drought 
and new growth appears soon after the first rain. On 
the other hand, frequent, shallow watering encourages 
the germination of crabgrass seeds, increases the 
probability of disease on bluegrasses and stimulates 
the growth of bentgrasses. The latter have come to 
be regarded as undesirable in ordinary home lawns 
because they are highly susceptible to disease and 
will not withstand even slight drought. 

If you must water, be sure that it is needed ; 
thick turf can go for a long period without rain. Then 
apply enough water to penetrate to a depth of 6 inches. 
This takes hours ; it is not a hose-in-hand operation. 
Make sure you have a good sprinkler (or even several 
sprinklers) and that it distributes water evenly. 

The inability to maintain grass under maples and 
other shallow rooted trees is more often due to lack 
of water than shade. Because tree roots absorb tre- 
mendous quantities of moisture from the soil, it is 
necessary to water very frequently to maintain any 
grass at all and even then it is often necessary to 
sow temporary grasses such as redtop. perennial rye- 
grass or Italian ryegrass (the last two are often sold 
as domestic ryegrass). 

CONTROL OF BROADLEAF WEEDS 

Weeds, such as plantain, dandelion and chick- 
weed are classed as broadleaf weeds as distinguished 
from the weed grasses such as crabgrass, foxtail, 
quackgrass and Muhlenbergia. 

If your lawn has broadleaf weeds generally dis- 
tributed throughout, use 2,4-D, 2,4.5-T, 2,4,5-TP or a 
combination of two of these. While the materials are 
manufactured under a variety of trade names in both 
liquid and dry forms (in which the chemical is carried 
on an inert material such as vermiculite), the drv 



form has the advantage of being ready to use and 
can be applied with a spreader. It also reduces the 
j)0ssibility of damaging nearby shrubs and other 
plants. 

If your lawn is so weedy that reseeding will be 
necessary, apply a broadleaf weed killer in mid-August 
so you can sow grass seed in early September. If 
you prefer to sow seed in spring, when earliness is 
a critical factor, do so in early April and then wait 
until after the second mowing to make a general 
application of weed killer. 

In a well established lawn apply these materials 
any time during the growing season. There is some 
indication that a late summer application is best since 
it not only kills the perennial weeds but destroys the 
newly ripened seeds of both annual and perennial 
weeds. In any case always apply these materials 
according to directions. The amount used per given 
area is of extreme importance. 

CRABGRASS CONTROL 

Crabgrass control chemicals fall into two cata- 
gories : pre-emergence (applied before crabgrass ap- 
pears) and post-emergence (applied when crabgrass 
is visible). The newer pre-emergence materials, which 
have proved to be especially well adapted to Delaware 
Valley conditions, consistantly provide about 70-80% 
control of crabgrass. They are dacthal, zytron and 
tri-calcium arsenate. With these materials, combined 
with good lawn management as already outlined, 
you can expect to attain nearly complete control. In 
no case should you expect the job to be done by 
chemicals alone, since a vigorous turf is the vital first 
step in eliminating this annual weed. 

If your lawn is 50% or more permanent grasses, 
apply a pre-emergence material in March or very early 
April. This has a long term effect and will continue 
to destroy germinating crabgrass seed over a period 
of several weeks. If you feel that you must do some 
seeding in spring to fill in sparse areas, do it in very 
early April ; then apply a new material, (calcium- 
propyl-arsonate) in May. This chemical has both 
pre- and post-emergence eft'ect on crabgrass and will 
not destroy the new, desirable grasses. 

To complement the pre-emergence materials and 
to gain nearly complete eradication of crabgrass, it 
also is necessary to use a post-emergence chemical. 
These are generally organic arsenicals with long chem- 
ical names which have been abbreviated as DMA, 
DSMA, dimet, sodar, AMA and Calar. Get into the 
habit of examining the lawn as you mow, learn to 
recognize the crabgrass plants while still small. 
Make the first application of post-emergence material 

(Cont'd next page) 



LAWN CARE PROGRAM 

(Cont'd from page two) 

as soon as you see the young plants — about mid-June — 
and make a second application five to seven days later. 



SPOT TREATMENT 

If you have gained reasonably complete control 
over crabgrass and other weeds in the past few years, 
you may be able to rely on spot treatment of the few 
which do appear. The great adxantage of the dry 
forms of both broadleaf weed and crabgrass control 
materials is in the fact that you can see where they 
have been applied ; this is of particular importance in 
spot treatment. It is important to realize that the 
relationship between the amount of material used and 
the area covered is highly critical so always follow 
directions exactly as written on the container. 

In addition to treating scattered crabgrass plants 
and broadleaf weeds, spot treatment of specific weed 
pests often is required to bring them under control. 

Wild garlic is easily eradicated with 2,4-D if 
spot treatment is used persistantly over a period of 
two or three years. 

Winter annuals (the worst one is chickweed) 
require special treatment. In late fall apply 2,4,5-TP 
or silvex (sometimes combined with 2,4-D). 

Knotweed grows most prolifically at the edge of 
driveways and walks, where soil is compacted and 
dry. In fact, this weed often appears in the middle 
of asphalt areas. While 2,4-D will kill it (usually 
with repeated spot applications), it is necessary to 
correct the soil condition if permanent control is 
desired. This, of course, requires re-working the soil 
in these areas to overcome compaction and low 
fertility. 

Spotted spurge, a summer annual which can 
spread throughout the lawn also can l)e controlled 
with chickweed killer at the same rate of application. 

Muhlenbergia is a weed grass which appears to 
be spreading rapidly. It makes a nice, fine carpet 
but. unfortunately, it turns brown with the first frost 
and creates pock-marks in the fall and winter lawn. 
Eradicate it with a spot grass killer (which kills all 
grasses) and then reseed affected spots. Zytron, at 
20 pounds per thousand square feet applied in two 
applications (June and July), is reported to be giving 
control the following year. 



LAWN DISEASES 

Much attention has been given to lawn diseases in 
recent years. They often are a result of special 
weather and/or soil conditions, such as humidity, high 
temperatures, over-fertilization and a high proportion 
of bent or other soft grasses in the lawn. While a 
particular disease may be bothersome at one time or 
another on a home lawn, it may never appear again. 
In the spring of 1961 there was an abundance of Snow 
Mold, but it was the result of the winter preceding it. 
There is little to be done for this problem after it 
appears except to clean up the diseased area by raking 
it so that it dries out and to apply fertilizer and grass 
seed if needed. 

If you see a spot which looks like it is infected 
with a fungus, dust or spray it with any fungicide 
which you have on hand at the moment. Materials are 
available in garden supply stores for more difficult 
situations and specific lawn diseases. 



RENOVATION OF EXISTING LAWNS 

Probal)ly more mistakes are made in "doing over" 
a poor lawn than in any other phase of gardening. 
Even if your lawn appears to be nearly lOO^t' crab- 
grass and weeds, it is not necessary to tear it up and 
start over again unless the lawn needs regrading or 
is intolerably rough. Indeed, to do so, is to invite 
more troubles than may already exist. Do not, under 
any circumstances, add top soil — you will only suc- 
ceed in importing weed seeds — and avoid salesmen 
who suddenl}- appear at N'our door with truckloads of 
dark, rich-looking stuff which (they say) contains 
miracles. Better use your money and effort to build 
on what you already have ; it will he less expensive 
and provide better results. 

If your lawn needs renovating, have the soil 
tested to determine lime and fertilizer requirements. 
Apply two applications (a week apart) of a post- 
emergence crabgrass killer and one application of a 
broadleaf w^eed killer starting early in August. Aerate 
if possible, with an aerater, and apply fertilizer, lime 
and seed in early September. By late fall you'll have 
a luxurious new turf, and if you follow lawn manage- 
ment practices as outlined in this article, yours can 
be as good a lawn as you want it to be. 



GARDEN VISITS 

Two spring garden visits have been sched- 
uled: May 6 in Haddonfield, N. J., and June 3 on the 
Main Line. Details will be included in next month's 
NEWS. 



I 



NEW LIBRARY BOOKS 



Modern indoor gardening by G. F. Gardiner. Distrib- 
uted by St. Martin's Press. 1961. ix, 150 pp.. 
illus. $4.50. 

Another book on house plants is usually welcome, 
and this one is. The author, so appropriately named, 
is at the University of Bristol. The book has the 
customary early chapters on treatment, culture and 
propagation of house plants. Plant management is 
based largely on England's cool, moist climate. Lists 
of plants for beginners, for shop decoration and for 
window boxes are helpful. Nearly 100 pages are given 
to the individual treatment of about 120 species and 
varieties. A by-product is some of the English com- 
mon names: Babys Tears (Helxine soleirolii) is Mind- 
Your-Own-Business! (Rev. by L. W.) 

Your garden soil; how to make the most of it by 
R. Milton Carleton. Van Nostrand, 1961, v, 170 
pp. $3.95. 

Every gardener will profit by reading tlie material 
on soils Dr. Carleton has translated and condensed 
from technical literature. Included are chapters on 
pH, soil tests, nutrients, fertilizers, organic and inor- 
ganic gardening, composting, the earthworm, etc. The 
appendix contains pH readings for plants, mineral 
deficiencies as shown by leaf colors, and where to 
send soil samples for testing. 

Iris culture and hybridizing for everyone by Wilma 
L. Vallette. Distributed by the author, Delco. 
Idaho. 1961. iv, 430 pp., illus. $5.75. 
(Letter by a member to librarian) "Thank you so 
much for letting me read this new l")Ook. It is the 
first book I've purchased in over five years. Yet why 
this book? From my limited literary viewpoint it's 
not very well written: many times the sentences be- 
come so tangled that several times over them does 
not always clear up the meaning, especially in the 
chapters on color. For the chapters on culture, dis- 
eases and pests, methods of hybridizing and growing 
seed, however, the book is well worth the cost. Mrs. 
Vallette has included numerous "plain dirt gardener' 
methods ; ways which give even the beginning grower- 
breeder a chance to have lovely iris without exorbitant 
expenses, a characteristic definitely missing in most 
other iris books. Irisarians who delve into these ideas 
(correlated from a great number of articles) and who 
also check them against other authorities will benefit. 
Randolph's Garden irises is better written and lighter 
reading with all its lovely pictures, still I pick Mrs. 
Vallette's book as useful to anyone truly interested 
in growing iris." 

Iris for every garden rev. ed. by Sydney B. Mitchell. 

M. Barrows, 1960. 216 pp., illus. 9 col. pis. $4.95. 

The first edition was published in 1949 and special 
attention is given in the new edition to the latest 



cultivars. particularly in the smaller Ijearded irises, 
culture, diseases, breeding and sources of plants. 
Popular treatment for iris growers in the United 
States and Canada. 

Index to common names of herbaceous plants comp. 

bv K. Milton Carleton. Shoe String Press, 1962. 

(4), 129 pp. $10.00. 

What plant enthusiast has not gotten into a 
discussion as to which is the proper common name, 
or, knowing the common name, attempts to find the 
scientific name which will lead him to a good descrip- 
tion for identification. Dr. Carleton's alphabetical 
listing provides the current usage; each common 
name is followed by the botanical name or names. 
For example, Flowering-Moss : Phlox subulata; Pyxi- 
danthera barulata; Sedum pulchellus. Generally the 
scientific names used conform to Horius II. 

The nature and uses of modern fungicides Ijy Eric G. 

Sharvelle. Burgess, 1961. iii, 308 pp.. illus., spiral 

binding. $6.00. 

This comprehensive handbook is designed to help 
those who want to understand technical agriculture 
and its complex chemicals for plant disease control. 
Beginning with a chapter on ancient fungicides, the 
author covers later periods, such as Parkinson's con- 
trol for tree cankers in 1629, and interestingly leads 
into modern and specific fungicides, their nature and 
economics, seed and soil treatment, laboratory testing. 
compatability of fungicides and insecticide^, and toler- 
ances and limitations. Each chapter is well docu- 
mented; the appendix contains conversion factors and 
formulas plus a glossary. 

1001 questions answered about insects by .-\lexander 
B. and Elsie B. Klots. Dodd. Mead & Co., 1%1. 
xvii, 260 pp., illus. 16 pis. $6.00. 
The class Insecta is vast and the authors expertly 
jirovide a better understanding of it to gardeners in 
their cjuestion-answer book. Some examples are : 
how is the color of the flower of importance in pollina- 
tion ? How can an insect cause the formation of a 
gall? Are there many plants that catch and eat 
insects? This is a fine work for the amateur 
entymologist. 

The dragon tree; a life of Alexander, Baron von 
Humboldt bv \'al Gendron. Longmans. Green & 
Co., 1961. x,'214 pp.. 8 pis. $3.75. 
An interesting biography of a great 19th century 
scientist, adventurer and statesman. The author states 
that he was a giant among men. In botany he en- 
gaged with .Aime' Bonpland in the collection of 60,000 
plants, and described 3.500 new species. He gave 
the first scientific accounts of rubber and cinchona 
trees. The Society Library has one of his taxonomic 
works. Monographic des melastomacees. 



DAFFODIL JUDGING SCHOOL 
AND SYMPOSIUM 

A special Daffodil Judging School and Symposium 
is scheduled for April 12-13 at the Friends Meeting 
House, Swarthmore College Campus, Swarthmore, 
Pa. The event is co-sponsored by the Northeast 
Region of The American Daffodil Society, the Scott 
Foundation of Swarthmore College and The Pennsyl- 
\-ania Horticultural Society. Reservations must be 
made in advance ; a program for both events and 
registration information are available by writing or 
telephoning to the Horticultural Society (LO 3-8352). 
Topics included in the two-day program are: daffodil 
classification, judging characteristics, identification and 
point scoring, culture and health, the newest daffodils 
and a period for questions and discussion. 



DAFFODIL SHOW SCHEDULES AVAILABLE 

The annual Daffodil Show of The Pennsylvania 
Horticultural Society is scheduled for April 18-19. 
in the Philadelphia National Bank, Broad and Chest- 
nut Streets, Philadelphia. Show hours are 1 :00 P.M.- 
7:30 P.iM., on Wednesday, 9:30 A.M. -3:30 P.M., 
Thursday. This show is accredited by the American 
Daffodil Society. 

Members of the Society who have exhibited in 
past daffodil shows will receive this year's show 
schedule automatically ; others may obtain a copy b}- 
writing or telephoning to the Society office. 



A TELEPHONE SUGGESTION 

A new telephone system has been installed in the 
offices and library of the Horticultural Society which 
is much more effective and provides more flexibility 
than the one replaced. Since the great number of 
calls received may keep telephones in constant use, 
we ask that you follow these suggestions : 

1. Please telephone before noon for answers to 
horticultural questions. 

2. Please indicate the purpose of your call by asking 
for the library, the Membership Secretary, or by 
stating that you have a horticultural question, 
a flower show question, etc. In this manner the 
call will be routed directly to the person handling 
the information requested. Certain questions can 
be answered by more than one person, so stating 
the purpose of your call will help to provide you 
with an answer more quickly. 



MEMBERS INVITED TO 
JOHN BARTRAM DAY 

Memljers of The Pennsylvania Horticultural 
Society will be the guests of the John Bartram Asso- 
ciation at Bartram's Garden on Sunday, April 29, 
3 :00 - 5 :00 P. M. 

Special ])oints of interest throughout the house 
and garden will be marked and members of the Asso- 



ciation will l)e present tu serve as guides. At 4:00 
P. M. Carlton B. Lees, Director of the Horticultural 
Society will read short excerpts from the letters of 
John Bartram and Peter Collinson \\hich provide a 
unique insight to the life of one of America's most 
important botanists. Refreshments will be served, 
and small potted Franklinia trees will be on sale for 
the benefit of the Bartram Association. 

The John Bartram .Association has made con- 
sideraljle progress in furnishing the house according 
to the period in which the botanist occupied it. Several 
garden clubs have assisted with this project and the 
-Association is anxious to restore as much of this 
garden as possible. 

To reach Bartram's Garden, take first left turn 
from University Avenue exit of Schuykill Expressway. 
Cross bridge, turn right at first light on to Grays Ferry 
Road. Cross another Ijridge, Ijear left at next light. 
Drive one block to 49th Street. Turn left and follow 
trolley tracks until you cross railroad bridge (the 
tracks turn from 49th St. on to Elmwood Ave.) Turn 
sharp left immediately to drive into Bartram's Garden. 



MEMBERS' EVENING 

The members' evening on the organization of 
small properties which was to have taken place on 
Tuesday, March 6, was cancelled because of weather 
conditions. Carlton B. Lees, Director of the Society 
will present this topic .April 3. He will demonstrate, 
diagramatically, ho\v to deal with landscape prob- 
lems. Slides and drawings will be used to illustrate 
the analysis and solution of problems discussed. 

Miss Mary O. Milton, staff' Horticulturist, will 
discuss the selection of woody plants for small gardens 
for the members' evening on Tuesday, May 1. 

Programs start at 7:30 P.M., the library opens 
at 6:30 P.M., on these dates for the convenience of 
members. 



PLANT EXCHANGE 

The annual plant exchange of The Pennsylvania 
Horticultural Society will be held Saturday, April 28, 
in the barn at the Frederic Ballard, Jr. residence, 
Northwestern Ave. and Thomas Rd., Chestnut Hill. 

All plants for exchange must be received 
before 9:30 A.M. 

Bartering begins at 10:00 A.M. 
More emphasis will be placed on quality this year. 
All unlabeled or questionable plants will go into a 
Bargain Basement : anyone bringing in only Bargain 
Basement material will be able to trade only there. 
In order to be eligible for bartering in the Connois- 
seur's Corner you must provide quality plants for 
that department. Plants of good quality l^ut not of 
unusual merit will earn points for "main floor" trading. 





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GARDEN CLINICS 

APRIL 14 (Saturday) Chestnut Hill 2:00 P.M. 

ESPALIERS 

Ernesta Drinker Ballard 
Each member will be supervised in pruning and 
training a plant to be taken home and planted in his 
or her own garden. 

APRIL 19 (Thursday) Ambler 10:30 A. M. 

PLANNING FOR EASY MAINTENANCE 

Martha Ludes Garra 
A very busy homemaker and professional horti- 
culturist keeps her garden in perfect order. At her 
clinic on easy garden maintenance, she will tell, and 
more important, show how it's done. 

APRIL 24 (Tuesday) Chestnut Hill 2:00 P.M. 

ESPALIERS Repeat of April 14th Clinic 

MAY 1 (Tuesday) Chestnut Hill 2:00 P.M. 

ESPALIERS Repeat of April 14th Clinic 

Register by usirm the clip-out coupon. Please enclose check and 
mail to -W) Suburban Station. Phila. .?. Registrations accepted in the 
order received; confirmation by return post card. 

GARDEN CLINIC REGISTRATION | 

Please register me for the Garden Clinic : i 

n April 19 PLANNING FOR 

EASY MAINTENANCE | 

($2.00 per member) 

n May 1 ESPALIERS 

($2.00 per member) | 

Name I 

Address 

Telephone 



DATES To Mark On Your CALENDAR 

APRIL 3 (Tuesday) MEMBERS' EVENING 7:30 P.M. 

ORGANIZING YOUR PROPERTY 

Carlton B. Lees 
389 Suburban Station Building 

APRIL 12-13 DAFFODIL JUDGING SCHOOL AND SYMPOSIUM 

Swarthmore, Pa. 
(advance registration necessary) 

APRIL 14 (Saturday) GARDEN CLINIC 2:00 P.M. 

ESPALIERS 

(advance registration necessary) 

APRIL 18-19 (Wednesday Thursday) DAFFODIL SHOW 

Philadelphia National Bank Building 
Broad and Chestnut Streets 

APRIL 19 (Thursday) GARDEN CLINIC 10:30 A.M. 

PLANNING FOR EASY MAINTENANCE 

(advance registration necessary) 

APRIL 24 (Tuesday) GARDEN CLINIC 2:00 P.M. 

ESPALIERS 

(advance registration necessary) 

APRIL 28 (Saturday) PLANT EXCHANGE 8:30 to noon 
Chestnut Hill 

APRIL 29 (Sunday) JOHN BARTRAM DAY 3:00 P.M. 

Bartram's Gardens 

MAY 1 (Tuesday) GARDEN CLINIC 2:00 P.M. 

* ESPALIERS 

(advance registration necessary) 

MAY 1 (Tuesday) MEMBERS' EVENING 7:30 P.M. 

SELECTING PLANT MATERIALS 

Mary O. Milton 
389 Suburban Station Building 

MAY 6 (Sunday) GARDEN VISITS 2:00-5:00 P.M. 

Haddonlield, N. J. 

MAY 19-20 ((Saturday Sunday) IRIS SHOW 



THE PENNSYLVANIA 
HORTICULTURAL 



SOCIETY 



1617 PENNSYLVANIA BOULEVARD 
PHILADELPHIA 3. PENNSYLVANIA 



^!2S^ 




VOL III No. 5 



MAY 1962 



QUALITY VEGETABLES 

In recent years a great deal of attention has been 
given to factors other than flavor in the development 
of new fruits and vegetables. Shipping ability, keeping 
quality, attractiveness and machine-like precision in 
size and shape is often more important than flavor 
for marketing purposes. Freezing is another factor 
which has influenced the development of new varieties. 

In the home garden emphasis should be placed 
on flavor for top table quality. Flavor is the extra 
dividend which makes the home vegetable plot, how- 
ever small, worth while. With this in mind. The 
Pennsylvania Horticultural Society recommends the 
following list of vegetables. 

Beans — Wade (green), Tendercrop (green), 
Easter Butterwax (yellow), Blue Coco (green, pole). 
Lima bean — Fordhook U. S. No. 242. Beets — Detroit 
Dark Red, Long Season (also called Winter Keeper). 
Broccoli — Waltham 29. Brussels Sprouts — Jade Cross 
Cauliflower — Early Purple Head. Carrots — Nantes, 
Tendersweet. Corn — Minature, Wonderful. Eggplant 
— Black Beauty. Lettuce — Bibb, Matchless, Sweet- 
heart, Ruby, Salad Bows. Onions — Ebenezer sets. 
Parsley — Paramount. Peas — Little Marvel, Wando, 
World's Record, Lincoln, Mommoth Melting Sugar. 
Pepper — Champion, Pennwonder. Radish — Icicle. 
Spinach — Viking, America. Squash — Zucchini Hy- 
brid, Seneca Prolific Hybrid. Tomato — Big Boy, 
Sunray, Rutgers, Red Cherry, Yellow Plum (the last 
two are small fruited). 



CONSULTING SERVICE AVAILABLE 

Members of The Pennsylvania Horticultural 
Society may obtain garden consultations with Miss 
Mary O. Milton, staff Horticulturist, to help them 
with specific garden problems. Due to transportation 
and other costs, it has become necessary for the 
Society to establish a fee of $5.00 per consultation. 

If you wish to take advantage of this service, 
telephone the Society (LO 3-8352) to arrange an 
appointment. 



FIRST AID FOR PANSY PLANTS 

The fragrant, bright clusters of pansies which 
are abundant in Delaware Valley gardens in April 
and May begin to diminish in number and size in the 
warm days of June. With a little extra attention, 
however, the plants withstand the heat of summer 
and provide flowers again in the fall. 

First of all, watch out for two insect pests : 
aphids and red spider mite. Aphids are easy to see 
but spider mites are not so easy to detect. Their 
presence is revealed by a yellowish stippling of the 
leaves. At the first sign of spider mite, spray with 
Malathion. This will also kill aphids. If you have a 
great many native violets at the edge of your garden 
and in other nearby locations, be extra alert for spider 
mites because naturalized plantings of violets are 
especially prone to infestation. 

Pansies are also prone to anthracnose. This is 
a fungus disease which causes browning and blotching 
of the leaves and eventual destruction of the plants. 
Spray with Captan twice to three times at five-day 
intervals when the first browning of leaves occurs. 

By late June, the stems of pansy plants become 
long and straggly. At this time simply lift the stems 
in a bunch, in one hand, and with a pair of shears 
cut them back to within two or three inches of the 
crown of the plant. You will be left with bare stems 
which soon will send out new growth. Feed with a 
water-soluble, complete fertilizer as the new growth 
appears. By the time cool weather arrives you will 
have compact, ready-to-bloom plants to help carry 
your garden through the fall season. 



MEMBERS' EVENING - MAY 

Miss Mary O. Milton, staff Horticulturist of The 
Pennsylvania Horticultural Society will discuss the 
selection of woody plants for the small garden on 
Tuesday, May 1, 7:30 P.M. She will evaluate trees 
and shrubs which can be controlled and which are 
especially suited to limited space. The library will be 
open at 6:30 P.M. 



MEMBERS INVITED TO SEE 
HADDONFIELD GARDENS 

Seven gardens in Haddonfield, New Jersey, will 
be opened to members of The Pennsylvania Horti- 
cultural Society on Sunday, May 6, 2 :(X) to 5 :00 P.M. 
to inaugurate the 1962 Garden Visits program. In 
several instances, members will be able to walk from 
one garden to another. 
ROUTE 

From the Benjamin Franklin Bridge take Route 
70 to Ellisburg Circle (6.7 miles, second circle beyond 
Garden State Race Track) turn right on Route 41 
(Kings Highway). Continue through Haddonfield 
business section across railroad and past traffic light 
to Chews Landing Road (Route 41 continued) turn 
left and continue to Bellevue Avenue (.4 miles) to 
house of 

(1) Mr. and Mrs. Curtis H. Clement 
411 Chews Landing Road 

Immediately adjacent to the Clements' — visit home of 

(2) Mr. and Mrs. Andrew M. Baird 
407 Chews Landing Road 

After leaving Bairds' return two blocks towards Kings 
Highway to Mountwell Avenue. Turn right, and third 
house on left is home of 

(3) Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Armstrong 
253 Mountwell Avenue 

After leaving Armstrongs', return to Chews Landing 
Road continue right (.3 mile) toward Kings Highway 
to home of 

(4) Mr. and Mrs. Rae Crowther 
50 Chews Landing Road 

After leaving Crowthers', continue on Chews Landing 
Road to Kings Highway. Bear right through Haddon- 
field (.8 mile) on right to home of 

(5) Dr. and Mrs. Stanley Brown 
344 Kings Highway E. 

After leaving Browns', walk around corner of Roberts 
Avenue to third house on right to home of 

(6) Mr. Herbert Leicht 
22 Roberts Avenue 

After leaving Mr. Leicht's — return to Kings Highway 
and cross the street to the Haddonfield Historical 
Society. 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

Your membership card is your ticket of admission 
to each garden. Members may bring guests upon 
payment of $1.00 per guest. Guest tickets are avail- 
able at any of the gardens and will admit guests to 
all of the gardens open for the day. Family groups 
will be admitted upon presentation of a Family, Con- 
tributing or Sustaining Membership Card. 

Members are requested not to arrive at any 
gardens before the scheduled opening hour (2:00 
P.M.) and to leave promptly at closing time (5:00 
P.M.). Gardens will be open irrespective of weather. 

Joseph W. Townsend of Wawa is Chairman of 
the Garden Visits Committee. He has been assisted 



by Mrs. Andrew M. Baird and Mrs. Louis H. Goettel- 
mann, of Haddonfield and Richard Thomson of 
Wynnewood. 

On Sunday, June 3, members of the Society will 
visit the gardens of Mr. Thomson, Dr. George P. 
Glauner and the Arboretum of the Barnes Foundation. 
Details and route instructions will appear in next 
month's NEWS. 

See back page for Bus information. 



CHRYSANTHEMUM SHOW 

The 1962 Chrysanthemum Show will be housed 
in the American Baptist Convention at Valley Forge. 
This newly opened building has become an important 
landmark and its handsome interior offers excellent 
opportunity for a fresh approach to staging. The 
show will be sponsored in cooperation with the Men's 
Chrysanthemum Club of Norristown and the Phila- 
delphia Branch, National Association of Gardeners. 
RADCLIFFE CLASS 

The Wayne W. Radcliffe class, established by the 
Philadelphia Chapter, N.A.G. is for amateur growers 
and replaces the old Class 46. The class is named 
for the Vice President of the Bartlett Tree Expert 
Co. in recognition of his devotion to horticulture and 
his continued support of gardening activities and 
organizations in the greater Philadelphia area. While 
an individual must win first place in the class three 
times for permanent possession of the trophy, each 
winner will receive a smaller annual trophy in 
recognition of his or her achievement. 

For the Radclifife Class, three cuttings of an 
unknown variety will be provided to the first fifty 
persons to enter the class. Entries may be made by 
mail only and must be addressed to The Pennsylvania 
Horticultural Society, 389 Suburban Building. In- 
structions for picking up cuttings, cultural specifica- 
tions, etc. will be provided by return mail. 
BONSAI 'MUMS AND CASCADES 

Two special classes are provided for members 
who would like to try their hand at growing small 
flowered chrysanthemums as cascades and as modified 
Bonsai in the manner of the Japanese. Special instruc- 
tions will be given to participants in this group of 
Chrysanthemum Show classes. If you would like 
to take part, register by writing or telephoning the 
Society (LO 3-8352) before May 1. A meeting date 
for all entering these classes will be set for early May. 



BONSAI EVENING 

A special evening for Bonsai enthusiasts is 
scheduled for Tuesday, May 15 at 7:30 P.M. at 389 
Suburban Station Building. 

Each member is urged to bring at least one 
Bonsai. This will be an informal round-table kind of 
a meeting in which all attending will have the oppor- 
tunity to participate and ask questions. Ernesta 
Drinker Ballard (Mrs. Frederic Ballard, Jr.) will lead 
the discussion. 



NEW LIBRARY BOOKS 



All about vines and hanging plants by Bernice 
Brilmayer. Doubleday, 1962. 384 pp. lUus. 4 col. 
pis. $5.95. 

New ideas are presented by the author about 
hanging and climbing plants for both indoors (with 
artificial lighting techniques) and outdoors (on fences, 
walls and trellises). The second part of the book, 
which might be called a small encyclopedia, discusses 
more than 1,300 species in more than 265 genera of 
ferns and flowering plants. Also included are sources 
where vines, hanging plants and containers may be 
purchased. 

The new perennials preferred by Helen Van Pelt 
Wilson. M. Barrows & Co., 1961. 320 pp. Illus. 
$4.95. 

Readers of the author's popular books on house 
plants, geraniums, African violets and roses will wel- 
come this third edition of Perennials which contains 
three additional chapters, revised lists and illustrations. 
Recognition is given to one of our members, Leonie 
Bell, for her horticultural assistance. 

Grow cacti; a practical handbook 2d ed. by C. 

Marsden. Distributed by St. Martin's Press, 1958. 

178 pp. 6 pis. illus. $4.50. 

From years of experience the author gives sound 
practical information to the amateur for successfully 
growing cacti outdoors and in, from seeds, cuttings 
and offsets and without soil (nutrient solutions). 
Pests, diseases and injuries, outline of cultivation, 
classification, photography and other miscellaneous 
information is discussed. This book can help the 
reader to achieve a serious understanding of cacti. 

Dahlias for everyone revised ed. by T. R. H. Lebar. 

Distributed by St. Martin's Press, 1961. 208 pp. 

Illus. 4 col. pis. $3.95. 

The vice-chairman of the National Dahlia Society 
(England) says: "As a guide to the modern principles 
and practices of dahlia culture this book is unsur- 
passed." Mr. Lebar is an exhibitor and grower of 
dahlias besides being very active in the N.D.A. 

Garden shrubs and trees by S. G. Harrison. Kew 
Series. Distributed by St. Martin's Press, 1%0. 
I 318 pp. Illus. Col. pis. $6.95. 

The text and illustrations, fifteen in color, were 
prepared by a member of the staff of the Royal 
Botanic Gardens at Kew. It's non-technical language 
will be popular with new students of plants. S. 
Mendelson Meehan remarked that it is a convenient 
sized work for carrying in the pocket. 

Nematology; fundamentals and recent advances with 
emphasis on plant parasitic and soil forms ed. by 

J. N. Sasser and W. R. Jenkins. Univ. North 
Carolina Press. 1960. xv, 480 pp. Illus. $12.50. 
This is a reference work which contains a series 



of lectures presented in 1959 during a Southern 
Regional Graduate Session in Nematology. A greater 
portion of the book is devoted to classification and 
identification which includes physiology, anatomy and 
genetics — studies which must precede the topics in 
the remaining parts — ecology, host-parasite relations 
and control. Well documented, illustrated and indexed. 

Taylor's garden guide rev. by Norman Taylor. Dell 
(Laurel ed.) 1962. 448 pp. Illus. 8 col. pis. Paper. 
95c. 
Not to be compared with Taylor's encyclopedia 

of gardening, but is a handy size to carry for reading 

in spare moments, when you can be planning for a 

beautiful garden. 

Modern guide to house plants 2d ed. by Ann Warren. 

Dolphin Books, 1962. viii, 107 pp. Illus. 16 pis. 

Paper. 95c. 

A simple and well-written book for the beginner 
who wants success with growing house plants. 

The dried-flower book; a guide to methods and 

arrangements by Nita Cox Carico and Jane 

Calvert Guynn. Doubleday, 1962. 128 pp. Illus. 

Col. pis. $4.95. 

Although the book covers the subject quite well, 
it would have been more interesting had it included 
a discussion of the various preservatives now avail- 
able. Also the authors tend to confuse lichens with 
fungi (no mention is made of the latter) and on the 
end papers which contain a "Complete List of Plant 
Materials for Drying", lichen is used as a Latin name. 
Ever since the work of Acharius in 1810 the generic 
name Lichen has been a nomen nudum; early botanists 
grouped them with the algae. 

Flowers and botanical subjects on stamps by Shirley 
C. Tucker and Claude Weber. American Topical 
Society Handbook No. 30, 1961. 162 pp. Illus. 
$6.00. 

Compiled by professional botanists, this book is 
welcomed by all philatelists interested in plants. The 
main check list describes and lists with English and 
Latin names all forms of plant life; it is followed by a 
cross reference by countries of issuance. A third cross 
reference is by plant family and it is followed by an 
inclusive bibliography. 

California spring wildflowers; from the base of the 
Sierra Nevada and southern mountains to the sea 
by Philip A. Munz. University of California Press, 
1961. 122pp. Illus. Col. pis. Maps. Paper. $2.95. 

and 

California desert wild flowers by Philip A. Munz. 

Univ. California Press, 1962. 122 pp. Illus. Col. 

pis. Maps. Paper. $2.95. 
are two popular plant identification books which are 
very accurately compiled and attractively illustrated. 



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IRIS SHOW MAY 19, 1962 

The Delaware Valley Iris Society and The 
Pennsylvania Horticultural Society will combine 
efforts for a one-day iris show, Saturday May 19, 
at St. Alban's Church, (Rt. 252 and Chapel Rd. 
just north of West Chester Pike) Newtown 
Square, Penna. All entries must be made by 11 
A. M. The show is open to the public from Noon 
to 9 P. M. 

Anyone wishing a schedule please telephone 
or write to the Horticultural Society. (LO 3-8352) 



Bus reservation for Haddonfield: 

A bus will leave Pennsylvania Ave., in front of Suburban Station 
Building at 1 :00 P.M., Sunday, May 6 for members of the Society 
and their guests. All reservations ($1.50 per person) must reach 
the Society office by Moaday, April 30. 



BUS RESERVATION 

GARDEN VISITS 

Haddonfield, N. J. 

Sunday, May 6, 1962 

Application with payment ($1.50) must reach the 
Pennsylvania Horticultural Society, 389 Suburban Station 
Building, Philadelphia 3, by Monday, April 30. 



n 



Name 



Address 



Clip this comer and mail 



DATES To Mark On Your CALENDAR 

APRIL 28 (Saturday) PLANT EXCHANGE 8:30 to noon 
Chestnut Hill 

APRIL 29 (Sunday) JOHN BARTRAM DAY 3:00 P.M. 

Bartram's Gardens 

MAY 1 - 31 LANDSCAPE DEMONSTRATION 

Center Square Green 

MAY 1 (Tuesday) GARDEN CLINIC 2:00 P.M. 

ESPALIERS 

(advance registration necessary) 

MAY 1 (Tuesday) MEMBERS' EVENING 7:30 P.M. 

SELECTING PLANT MATERIALS 

Mary O. Milton 
389 Suburban Station Building 

MAY 6 (Sunday) GARDEN VISITS 2:00-5:00 P.M. 

Haddonfield, N. J. 

MAY 15 (Tuesday) BONSAI EVENING 7:30 P.M. 

389 Suburban Station Building 

MAY 19 DELAWARE VALLEY IRIS SHOW 2:00-9:00 P. M 

St. Alban's Church 

Newtown Square, Pa. 

JUNE 3 (Sunday) GARDEN VISITS 2:00-5:00 P.M. 

Merion, Wynnewood and Villanova 



Regional Lily Group To Be Formed 

Lily enthusiasts will meet in the rooms of The 
Pennsylvania Horticultural Society at 2:00 P.M., 
Saturday, May 5 to form a local unit which will be 
affiliated with the North American Lily Society. Dr. 
R. W. Lighty of Longwood Gardens will show slides 
of new lilies and will conduct the meeting. If you 
plan to attend please let us know (LO 3-8352). 



THE PENNSYLVANIA 



HORTICULTURAL 



SOCIETY 



1617 PENNSYLVANIA BOULEVARD 
PHILADELPHIA 3. PENNSYLVANIA 




VOL III No. 6 



JUNE 1962 



PROPAGATE PLANTS WITH SUMMER CUTTINGS 



Summer propagation of woody plants can be 
simple and uncomplicated, or elaborate and complex 
enough to intrigue the most exacting gardener. There 
seem to be no hard and fast rules about the ability 
of cuttings to withstand adverse conditions, and any 
instructions on exactly just which procedures to 
follow can almost invariably be disputed by someone 
who has rooted cuttings in opposition to even the 
most basic physiological requirements of plants. The 
beginner, however, will obtain the best results by 
adhering to a few simple rules. 

Summer cuttings are defined as those taken from 
either softwood or semi-hardwood. Softwood is the 
very new and tender growth produced in late spring 
and early summer (April-June) ; semi-hardwood is the 
more mature wood from which cuttings are taken 
later in the growing season (June- August). Cuttings 
of deciduous azaleas and lilacs are often taken as 
softwood, while viburnums, cotoneasters, and ever- 
green azaleas are taken later as semi-hardwood. Soft- 
wood cuttings are usually more difficult to keep 
from wilting but very often root more readily than 
semi-hardwood. In either case, cuttings are taken 
from the terminal ends of the branches, 3 to 6 inches 
long, and should include at least one, and preferably 
two leaf nodes. The lower leaves are removed, 
the basal end dipped into a rooting powder and 
inserted to a depth of from 1 to 3 inches into any 
one of many kinds of propagating media. The cuttings 
should be spaced so that the leaves are just touching 
each other. 

Rooting powders, or rooting hormones, are used 
to stimulate or speed the production of roots. Very 
often they are not necessary but in most cases do 
make the rooting percentages higher. Rooting powders 
for summer cuttings most commonly used are Root- 
one F (the F indicates the presence of a fungicide 
to help reduce the incidence of disease) or Hormodin 
No. 1 or No. 2. The base of the cutting is dipped into 
the powder and the excess removed by gently flicking 
the cutting. Only a thin film of powder is necessary. 

Flower pots, fiats, wood boxes, strawberry boxes, 
or a bed prepared in the corner of the garden 
can be used to root the cuttings. Cuttings of some 
types of plants will root just as consistently in a glass 
of water as in a greenhouse bench complete with an 



automatic misting device. When selecting a container, 
choose one that will best provide three basic propa- 
gating requirements : light, fairly constant moisture, 
and air. 

Rooting media include garden soil, peat moss, 
vermiculite, perlite, ashes or cinders, or almost any 
combination of these materials. Peat moss used alone 
has the disadvantage of being difficult to water 
properly. Once watered it often becomes water-logged, 
and if allowed to dry out is almost impossible to 
moisten thoroughly again. The addition of one of the 
lighter materials such as sand or perlite prevents the 
peat from packing and facilitates drainage. The med- 
ium must serve three functions: support the cutting, 
retain moisture, and at the same time be porous enough 
to furnish air to the base of the cutting. A propagating 
medium does not need to furnish nutrients since the 
cutting itself contains enough stored food to produce 
roots. 

Watering is the most critical factor in summer 
propagation and is, perhaps, the most frequent cause 
of failures. Comparatively little water can be taken 
up through the stem, and until roots are formed, 
water loss through the leaves is greater than that 
taken up. Since plants transpire less in moist air, 
water must be present in the atmosphere to reduce 
water loss from the leaves. Polyethelene tents placed 
over the cuttings help to maintain constant moisture. 
The water that is lost through the leaves collects on 
the inside of the tent and drips down again onto the 
cuttings. (Polyethelene permits the passage of air 
but not water. Do not use plastic garment covers. 
They are air tight and are not recommended for 
propagating.) An intermittent mist provided by an 
automatic watering device not only maintains high 
humidity around the cuttings, but it is also a source 
of constant fresh air to the medium. Various propa- 
gating experiments have shown that rooting percent- 
ages are consistently higher when a light, well aerated 
medium and a fresh water supply is used. 

The length of time necessary for cuttings to root 
varies. Azaleas (usually taken in August) may root 
in two to four weeks, or may take as long as six 
weeks. Viburnums may take as long as two months. 
Cuttings can be checked for rooting by gently lifting 

(continued on page 2) 



SUMMER CUTTINGS -(Cont'd) 

them from the medium. Firm (not wilted) leaves indi- 
cate that the cutting is progressing. The formation 
of callus at the base of the cutting usually indicates 
that rooting will occur, but not always. Some plants 
produce little or no obvious callus before rooting. 

Cuttings are ready for potting when the root 
mass consists of several roots from one to two inches 
long. The soil for the first potting should not be too 
dififerent in texture from the propagating medium, 
but at the same time contain enough soil to furnish 
nutrients to the roots. Two parts sand, one part peat, 
and one part good garden loam is a satisfactory mix- 
ture for most woody plants. If heavy clay soil is used, 
three or four parts sand and two parts peat moss 
may be necessary for each part soil. Use pots only 
slighter larger than the size of the root mass. If the 
cuttings are rooted early in the summer, the pot size 
should be large enough to accommodate the new 
growth which will be produced during the remaining 
growing months. It is usually not advisable to repot 
the cuttings late in the season since some root damage 
invariably occurs when repotting and the cutting does 
not have time to recover before the cold months come. 
Repotting after the plant has gone into winter 
dormancy is not necessary. 

Many propagating failures occur during the first 
winter after rooting. If the newly potted cuttings 
remain out of doors, the alternating freezing and 
thawing often bursts the pots ; the plants dry out, or 
if the winter is severe, the plants die from low tem- 
peratures. A cold greenhouse with a minimum night 
temperature of 40° F. and in which the day tempera- 
ture is not allowed to rise more than 15° or 20° F. 
above the outside temperature is almost too exacting 
for the average gardener. It is important to remember 
that on sunny days temperatures build up in a tightly 
covered cold frame and drop drastically at night. The 
warm temperatures induce growth which in turn is 
killed by the cold. Coldframes or a pit dug into the 
ground and covered with lath (the cuttings should 
not be in complete darkness) are usually adequate for 
woody plants in the Greater Delaware Valley. If 
glass is used to cover the frames it should be opened 
on sunny days or an air space of 2 or 3 inches left 
between the glass and the frame at all times. If a 
greenhouse or coldframe is not available, cuttings can 
be kept through the winter in a corner of the garage, 
on a window sill in the basement, or in an unheated 
attic. In any case, they should not be subjected to 
severe temperatures changes, allowed to dry out. 
nor to come into active growth. 

In the spring the cuttings may be repotted into 
larger pots or planted into the ground in a protected 
nursery area. If repotted, the pots should be plunged 
in the ground to help retain moisture. In some cases 
it may be desirable to carry them through the second 
winter in pots. 



A great many deciduous trees and shrubs can 
be propagated by summer cuttings. Some will root 
easily (privet, willow, azaleas, ivy) and some are 
more difficult (dogwoods, flowering cherries, vibur- 
nums). Generally, fast growing shrubs root more 
easily than trees, but given the proper treatment, and 
time enough, many of our garden trees and shrubs can 
be rooted. If you are interested in propagating 
plants maintain an optimistic attitude about rooting 
possibilities, be patient ; if you don't succeed the first 
time, try again. 

THE PENNSYLANIA HORTICULTURAL 
SOCIETY library contains well illustrated books on 
the propagation of woody plants which are available 
to members. 



Softwood Cuttings 

Japanese maple 

Deciduous azaleas 

Flowering quince 

Witchhazel 

Hydrangea 

Philadelphus 

Lilac 

Buddleia 

Fringe Tree 

Fothergilla 

Summersweet (Clethra) 

Corylopsis 

Flowering Cherries 



Semi-Hardwood Cuttings 

Viburnum 

Dogwood 

Cotoneaster 

Forsythia 

Privet 

Juniper 

Holly 

Magnolia 

Pieris 

Firethorn 

Willow 

Ivy 

Evergreen Azaleas 



GARDEN CLINICS 

JULY 17 (Tuesday) 389 Suburban Station 7:30 P.M. 
JULY 21 (Saturday) Ambler 2:00 P.M. 

PROPAGATION 

Mary O. Milton 
For many gardeners, propagation is the most 
exciting part of horticulture. Expert advice plus a 
large selection of unusual deciduous cuttings should 
add up to two rewarding days. The first, and lecture 
session, of this two-part clinic will be held in the 
Society room ; the second will be a demonstration/par- 
ticipation session held in the Greenhouses, Ambler 
Campus, Temple University. 



P" 



GARDEN CLINIC REGISTRATION 

Please register me for the Garden Clinic : 
n July 17 & 21 PROPAGATION 
($4.00 per member) 

Name - , 

Address 

Telephone _ 



J 



NEW BOOKS IN THE LIBRARY 



Flowering trees of the world; for tropics and warm 
climates by Edwin A. Menninger with a forward 
by B. Y. Morrison. Hearthside Press, 1962. xv, 
336 pp., 65 col. pis., illus. $18.95. 
The most comprehensive guide in print to 1000 
species of flowering trees and their possibilities for 
ornamental use, indicating adaptability to cold cli- 
mates, giving common and botanical names, author- 
ities, native habitats and quotations from regional 
botanical and horticultural literature. 

Manual of the trees of North America (exclusive of 
Mexico). 2d ed. by Charles Sprague Sargent with 
7Z2 illus. by C. E. Faxon and M. W. Gill. 2 vols., 
Dover, 1%1. $4.00 (paper). 

This printing is dedicated to the memory of 
Charles Sprague Sargent (1841-1927) for his contribu- 
tion to American arboriculture and forestry. It is an 
excellent reprint of the 1922 edition. 

Alpines for trouble-free gardening, by Alan Bloom. 

Charles T. Branford, 1961. 139 pp., 29 pis. $5.00. 

The author's first point in this book is that al- 
pine plants do not need to be associated with rocks. 
Over 1000 species and varieties are discussed, ar- 
ranged alphabetically by genus, covering hardiness 
(in England), growth and culture. 

Collins guide to bulbs by Patrick M. Synge. Collins, 
1961. 320 pp., 32 col. & 24 b & w pis. 30 shillings. 

Highly recommended by Gardeners Chronicle and 
Jour, of the Royal Horticultural Society; the former states : 
"This standard of publication on gardening is far in 
advance of horticultural books published in other 
countries and it should be well received in the United 
States." This will be the classic bulb book for some 
years. The composite plates from color paintings 
show many representative species and varieties of one 
genus on each plate. 

Of herbs and spices by Colin Clair. Abelard-Schuman, 
1961. 276 pp., illus. col. fp. $4.50 (delux $6.50). 
Description and economic significance of spices 
throughout history or a modern herbal divided into 
two parts, spices and herbs, in alphabetical order by 
common name. The twenty-one botanical woodcuts 
are taken from Fuchs' De historia stirpium (1542). 
Any member who is interested in comparing them 
with the original work may do so at the Society's 
Library. 

The Iris rev. ed. by N. Leslie Cave. St. Martin's, 
1959. 240 pp., 4 col & 35 b & w pis, maps. $7.50. 
Of interest to readers of this new edition is the 
attention given to American iris hybridizers and their 
new hybrids. A new chapter included is on dwarf 
and intermediate (Median) irises, the miniatures of 
tall bearded irises. Cultural notes are up-dated and 
also the alphabetical table of species by A. C. Herrick. 



Orchids by Walter Kupper, trans, by Jean W. Little 
and illus. by Walter Linsenmaier. Thomas Nel- 
son, 1962. 128 pp., illus. col. pis. $10.00. 

Beautiful color plates of 60 carefully illustrated 
orchids represent a cross-section of plants not fre- 
quently seen of this second largest plant family. The 
text is equally interesting and although one will not 
find cultural information, advice to the amateur is 
given as to what species are of difficult culture; also 
the book contains the history of orchid culture in 
England and some fantastic prices paid for these 
exotic plants. An excellent gift book. 

Home orchid growing 2d. ed. by Rebecca T. Northern. 

Van Nostrand, 1962. xiii, 320 pp., illus., 13 col. 

pis. $10.95. 

This greatly revised edition of Mrs. Northern's 
book (1st ed. published in 1950) will be appreciated 
by both amateur and commercial orchid growers. It 
includes new material on culture, propagation, disease 
control and orchid species. 

Turf management 2d ed. by H. Burton Musser. 
McGraw-Hill, 1962. x, 356 pp., illus. $10.95. 

The author. Professor of Agronomy at Pennsyl- 
vania State University, and collaborators have revised 
the 1950 edition to include latest developments in seed 
qualities and mixtures, reseeding, chemical weed con- 
trol and insecticides for care of golf courses, public 
park lawns and home owners' lawns. This is con- 
sidered by many to be the classic work on lawns in 
the United States. 

Miracle gardening encyclopedia by Samm Sinclair 
Baker. Grosset & Dunlap, 1961. viii, 406 pp., 
illus., col. pis. $5.95. 

The author, an amateur gardener, writes for 
people who enjoy using modern techniques for gar- 
dening and growing new improved plant varieties. 

;How to grow African violets 3d ed. by Carolyn K. 
Rector. A Sunset Book, Lane Publ. Co., 1962. 
64 pp., illus. $1.75. paper. 

A very popular work, highly recommended to all 
who enjoy growing these house plants. Additional 
Sunset Books : Sunset lawn and ground cover book 
2d ed., 1960, 56 pp., illus. $1.75, paper; Sunset patio 
book rev. ed., 1961, 166 pp., illus. $2.00, paper; con- 
tains fine new design and construction ideas ; Ideas 
for entryways and front gardens. 1961, 80 pp., illus., 
$1.50, paper; the numerous photographs which are 
described emphasize attractive plantings in limited 
spaces where green and colorful plant material softens 
the harshness of construction material; Garden and 
patio building book, five complete Sunset Books in 
one volume to cover your basic outdoor building 
needs, 1962, (575 pp.), illus. $6.95, cloth. 



NEW BOOK IN THE LIBRARY-(Cont'd) 

Dictionary of ecology by Herbert C. Hanson. Philo- 
sophical Library, 1962. (10), 382 pp. $10.00. 
This is a practical dictionary of terms but it is 
quite over-priced. The definitions are generally short 
and incomplete. The most valuable part of the book 
is the list of references at the end of the work. 

How to control plant diseases in the home and garden 

by Malcolm C. Shurtletif. Iowa State University 
Press, 1962. viii, 520 pp., illus. $4.95. 
The inexpensive price of this book is misleading. 
With the amount of good information contained in 
this book, the home gardener can easily identify 
and control the diseases which may be causing un- 
healthy plants. 

Japianese flower arrangement notebook by Patricia 
Kroh. Doubleday, 1962. 159 pp., illus. col. pis. 
$5.95. 

Not only will readers of this book receive a better 
understanding of Japanese culture, but also they will 
find travel notes on Japan, Japanese gardens, a glos- 
sary of Japanese words and a list of selected books for 
further reading. 

The art of table setting and flower arrangement by 
Sylvia Hirsch. Crowell, 1962. viii, 152 pp., 8 col. 
pis. $7.95. 
Designed to aid the new home-maker. 

Flower arranging by number by Peggy Boehm and 
Shizu Matsuda. Sterling Publ. Co., 1961. 124 pp., 
illus. $2.50. 

The sub-title of this little book is: "For people 
who want artistic results immediately." This method 
is patterned after painting by number. The authors 
give hints for preparing flowers for arranging and 
also types of containers for the arrangements. 



NEW BOOKS LISTED 

Leechdoms, wortcunning and starcraft of Early 
England; being a collection of documents . . . 
before the Norman Conquest collected and ed. by 
Thomas Oswald Cockayne with a new introduc- 
tion by Charles Singer. 3 vols. London, Holland 
Press, 1961. 

Edward Palmer ; plant explorer of the American West 

by Rogers McVaugh. Univ. Oklahoma Press, 
1956. 430 pp. pis. maps. 

Edible wild plants of eastern North America by M. L. 

Fernald and A. C. Kinsey, rev. by Reed C. Rollins. 
Harper & Bros., 1958. 472 pp. Illus. 

A book of wild flowers 160 plates after water colours 
by Elsa Felsko, pref. by C. D. Darlington, notes 
by Sheila Littleboy. Oxford, Bruno Cassirer, 1956. 
231 pp. 



Berberis and Mahonia; a taxonomic revision by 

L. W. A. Ahrentt. Jour. Linnean Soc. London. 
Botany 1961. 410 pp., illus. maps. 

Genetic research; a survey of methods and main 
results by Arne Miintzing. Stockholm, LTs 
Forlag, 1961. 345 pp., illus. 

Wintering of plants by I. M. Vasil'yev. Washington, 
D. C, A. I. B. S. 1961. 300 pp., illus. 

Pesticide index by Donald E. H. Frear. State College, 
Penna., College Science Publ., 1961. 193 pp. 

Handbook on bulb growing and forcing'. Northwest 
Bulb Growers Association, 1957. (8) 196 pp. 

Lawn and garden dealer guide 1962 annual directory. 
Flower Grower Publ. Co. 154 pp. 

Camellia nomenclature 8th ed. Southern California 
Camellia Society, 1962. 136 pp., illus. 

Supplement to the dictionary of gardening. Royal 
Horticultural Society, 1956. illus. 

A dictionary of the flowering plants and ferns 6th ed. 

Cambridge, 1960. xii, 752, liv pp. 

Flor '6L Esposizione Internazionale — Firoi del Mondo 
a Torino. Turin, 1961. 213 pp., illus. 

The Christopher Happoldt journal. Ed. with preface 
and biographies by Claude H. Neuffer. Contrib. 
Charleston Museum 13, 1960. 214 pp., ports. 



Contributions to the library are always welcome. 
Members may contribute to the library by purchasing 
books through the librarian. Books are purchased at 
the regular retail price and the library receives 10% 
of this amount. 



GIFTS TO THE LIBRARY 

Mrs. Edward M. Cheston has presented five horti- 
cultural and botanical books from her library to the 
Society's library. Among the titles are two rare books. 
Flora Americae Septentrionalis ; or a catalogue of the plants 
of North America 1771 by J. R. Forster and An inaugural 
botanico-medical dissertation on the Phytolacca decandra of 
Linnaeus 1795 by Benjamin Schultz who studied at 
the University of Pennsylvania. 

Mrs. Frederic Ballard, Jr. gave a copy of her book 
Garden in your house to the library to replace a much 
used and nearly worn out copy plus her new book 
The art of training plants. 



1963 PHILADELPHIA FLOWER SHOW 
HORTICULTURAL CLASSES 

SUNDAY, MARCH 10 

Class 

602 TRUMPET NARCISSUS, Golden Harvest or 
Unsurpassable, forced and shown in an 8 inch 
bulb pan or azalea pot. 

601 HYACINTH, L'Innocence or Arentine Arend- 
sen, forced and shown in an 8 inch bulb pan or 
azalea pot. 

602 SMALL (MINOR) BULBS (including corms, 
rhizomes, tubers) one variety, forced and shown 
in a 6 inch bulb pan. 

603 GLOXINIA, flowering plant any size or age. 

604 WINDOW SILL COLLECTION, a collection 
of indoor plants suitable for a window and 
grown by one to three exhibitors. Overall space 
to be filled, approximately 4 feet wide, 10 inches 
deep, 3 feet high. 

605 BONSAI, miniature plants, largest dimensions 
including container not to exceed 6 inches. 
Must have been in exhibitor's possession for 
one year. 

606 TULIP, Apricot Yellow or General de Wet, 
forced and shown in an 8 inch bulb pan or 
azalea pot. 

607 ROOTED CUTTINGS, one or more varieties 
of hardy evergreen trees or shrubs, ready for 
potting, grown in cedar flat 9 by 13 by 3 inches. 
Each entry to be accompanied by one cutting 
with visible root development in a plastic bag. 

608 TOPIARY IVY, named variety (s) of Hedera 
grown and trained in any form by the exhibitor, 
longest dimension not to exceed 3 feet. 

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13 
Class 

609 LARGE CUP NARCISSUS, Duke of Windsor 
or Fortune, forced and shown in an 8 inch bulb 
pan or azalea pot. 

610 HYACINTH, Flushing or Crown Princess 
Margaret, forced and shown in an 8 inch bulb 
pan or azalea pot. 

611 A LIVING EXHIBIT OF HORTICUL- 
TURAL MERIT OR INTEREST, grown by 
exhibitor and not exceeding 4 feet in height or 
3 feet in width. Judges will comment on horti- 
cultural skill, decorativeness and originality. 
(Not in competition.) 



612 ROOTED CUTTINGS, one kind, tender 
woody or herbaceous plant, growing in a cedar 
flat 9 inches by 13 inches by 3 inches. Each 
entry to be accompanied by one cutting with 
visible root development in a plastic bag. 

613 PLANT grown as a standard. Class limited to 
twelve entries. 

614 HANGING BASKET, foliage plant(s), 12 
inches or less. 

615 BONSAI, medium sized, vertical dimension 
including container over 6 inches not exceeding 
15 inches. Must have been in the possession 
of the exhibitor for one year. 

FRIDAY, MARCH 15 
Class 

616 TAZETTA NARCISSUS, Cragford or Geran- 
ium, forced and shown in an 8 inch bulb pan 
or azalea pot. 

617 HYACINTH, Queen of the Blues, Perle Bril- 
liant, or Bismarck, forced and shown in an 
8 inch bulb pan or pot. 

618 PLANT(s) for TERRACE DECORATION, 
one or more plants (planted at least a week 
prior to Show), in a single container suitable 
for a terrace, not to exceed 3 feet in any 
dimension. 

619 HANGING BASKET, plant(s) in bloom, 12 
inches or less. 

620 WOODY PLANTS, propagated by methods 
other than cuttings ; e.g., grafts, layers, seeds, 
etc. 

621 BONSAI, large plants over 15 inches. Must 
have been in the possession of the exhibitor 
for one year. 

622 GARDEN in a container, including one or 
more plants, largest dimension not to exceed 
18 inches. 

623 BROMELIADS, to be shown on their own 
mountings (driftwood, bark, etc.) greatest 
dimension not to exceed 3 feet. 



MAIN LINE GARDEN VISITS ON JUNE 3rcl 

Members of The Pennsylvania Horticultural 
Society will be the guests of Dr. George P. Glauner of 
Villanova, Mr. and Mrs. Richard Thomson of Wynne- 
wood, and Mrs. Albert C. Barnes of Merion, on 
Sunday, June 3, 2:00-5:00 P.M. This is the second 
Garden Visits day for 1962 and while but three gardens 
are included, each is unique. Dr. Glauner's garden 
encompasses many original and unusual design ideas. 
The Thomson garden includes old roses and a green- 
house-garden, and at the Arboretum of the Barnes 
Foundation which is noted for its extensive plant 
collections, alumnae and students will be on duty to 
answer horticultural questions. 



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LANDSCAPE DESIGN 
STUDY COURSE I 

The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society will co- 
operate with the Garden Club Federation of Penn- 
sylvania in sponsoring Course I, National Council of 
State Garden Clubs Landscape Design School, on 
October 15-17, in the Strawbridge & Clothier Audi- 
torium, Philadelphia. Details will be announced at a 
later date. 



Bus reservation for Garden Visits: 

A bus will leave Pennsylvania Ave., in front of Suburban Station 
Building at 1:30 P.M., Sunday, June 3 for members of the Society 
and their guests. All reservations ($1.50 per person) must reach 
the Society office by Tuesday, May 29. 



BUS RESERVATION 

GARDEN VISITS 

MAIN LINE 

Sunday, June 3, 1962 

Application with payment ($1.50) must reach the 
Pennsylvania Horticultural Society, 389 Suburban Station 
Building, Philadelphia 3, by Tuesday, May 29. 



Name 



Address 



Clip this corner and mail 



MAIN LINE GARDEN VISITS-(Cont'cl) 

ROUTE FOR MAIN LINE GARDEN VISITS 

From intersection of Spring Mill Road (Route 
320) and Montgomery Avenue (Route 23A) in Villa- 
nova proceed northwest (toward Valley Forge) .5 
mile, entrance on left to garden of 

(1) Dr. George P. Glauner 
1850 Montgomery Avenue 
(parking on Montgomery Avenue) 

Leaving Dr. Glauner's proceed southwest (toward 
Philadelphia) on Montgomery Avenue (Route 23A) 
4.8 miles to Wister Road, Wynnewood. Turn right to 
"Shortwood" (third house on left) to garden of 

(2) Mr. and Mrs. Richard Thomson 

415 Wister Road 

Return to Montgomery Avenue, turn right and 
continue to Cynwyd. Bear right on Old Lancaster 
Road to Latches Lane. Turn right on Latches Lane 
to corner of Lapsley Road, a total distance of 2.7 
miles, to 

(3) The Arboretum of The Barnes Foundation 
and Gardens of Mrs. Albert C. Barnes 

(entrances on both Latches Lane and Lapsley 
Road). 

MEMBERS: Be sure to have your Garden Visits 
guests register — the lucky guest will win a year's 
membership in the Society ! 



THE 



HORTICULTURAL 
SOCIETY 



1617 PENNSYLVANIA BOULEVARD 
PHILADELPHIA 3. PENNSYLVANIA 




VOL. Ill No. 7 



JULY- AUGUST, 1962 



PRUNING REMINDERS 



Pruning is a year round process, but late June 
and early July is the time to prune many evergreens. 
Because new growth has expanded to nearly its full 
length it is an ideal time to shear hedges of hemlock, 
yew and other evergreens having needle-like leaves. 
Enough growth continues after pruning to cover the 
cut ends of the twigs and to soften the appearance of 
the hedge. Pruning at this time also stimulates the 
formation of buds along the sides of twigs which 
give rise to new shoots next year. The result is a 
more compact plant because of the increased number 
of side branches and twigs. 



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Prune individual evergreens to retain their natural 
character. When a shrub has not overgrown its 
space, clip back the long shoots at the ends of branches 
(solid dots in diagramatic sketch) and clip side twigs 
to about half their original length. If the plant is 
becoming over-large, remove each branch just above 
a point where side branches arise from it (clear dots 
in diagram). The shrub will still maintain a more 
or less natural appearance if handled in this way. 
Do not use hedge shears on individual plants if you 
wish to avoid the hard "bowling "ball" effect of yester- 
vear. 




Fortunately Japanese yew, rhododendron, box- 
wood, Japanese pieris and many hollies lend them- 
selves to rather severe corrective pruning when neces- 
sary. They will produce new shoots because these 



plants have many dormant buds along the older 
branches which are stimulated into growth after 
severe pruning. This is not true with pines, spruces 
and junipers ; therefore, these plants do not lend them- 
selves to radical pruning. While the late June-early 
July period is best for shearing and ordinary mainte- 
nance pruning, radical pruning of evergreens is best 
done in early spring Ijefore growth starts so that 
plants have the advantage of a full growng season 
to recover. 




While no great damage is done if seed heads are 
not removed from rhododendrons, Japanese pieris, 
azalaes and lilacs, the appearance of the plants is 
better if you do so. It is no great job when few plants 
are involved ; if the number is great, then perhaps 
there will be only time and energy to remove seed 
heads from plants near an entrance walk, terrace or 
in similar places. The rhododendron seed heads break 
off easily without the aid of shears or a knife. Since 
the new shoots which arise from each side of the old 
flower cluster are very soft, be careful not to break 
them ofT. 

HEDGES 

If plants which are to be trained into hedges are 
allowed to retain their full growth each year, in the 
early years of their development, they form a weak 
structure which is prone to breaking in winter snows 
and winds. Hemlock is a very popular hedge material; 
yet one sees more poor hemlock hedges than good 
ones because they are allowed to retain too much 
of their annual growth when the plants are small. 

(continued next page) 



. . . FROM THE PRESIDENT 

\\'hi;n a meniljer of the Horticultural Society 
succeeds in getting 85 new members in three months 
we feel that we owe her a huge bouquet. The boucjuet 
we planned was a Life Membership, but our deserving 
member — Mrs. James Cameron Bleloch, of "Rox- 
ridge". Ridge Avenue, Philadelphia — already is a 
Life Member of the Society. It is difficult to express 
enough admiration for such enthusiasm as that of 
Mrs. Bleloch's, not only in her recent achievements, 
but in her sustaining interest in getting members for 
the Society over a period of many years. 

It has been rewarding to me, to see the enthusiasm 
of Mrs. Bleloch and of many others devoted to various 
phases of our activities. The Membership Committee 
under the Co-chairmanship of Mrs. John B. Carson 
and Richard Thomson is tireless in the pursuit of 
new members. 

Mrs. H. Cameron Morris, Jr., Chairman of our 
Philadelphia Flower Show Committee, reported to 
the Council that 450 volunteer workers — committee 
chairmen, exhibitors, clerks, aides, judges, etc. — were 
involved in helping make our section of the 1962 Show 
a success. 

The Daffodil and Iris Shows also involved the 
work of many. Considering committee workers, 
judges, exhibitors and others necessary to the success 
of such undertakings, each event required about 30 
to 35 volunteers and a total of more than 60 exhibitors. 
Mrs. J. Pancoast Reath was Chairman of the Daffodil 
Show and William T. Hirsch was Chairman of the 
Iris Show. 

Mrs. J. J. Willman, Chairman of our Garden 
Clinics Committee reported that there have been 166 
registrations since January 1. In this program mem- 
bers have the opportunity to obtain down-to-earth, 
first hand information on various horticultural prac- 
tices from well qualified instructors. 

New this year were the Members' Evenings, 
which were held on the first Tuesday of each month. 
We started in November and had a total of six 
informal evening programs. Mrs. H. Rowland Timms, 
Chairman of this activity, reported that over 210 
members attended. Fourteen members devoted a 
Saturday morning to organizing and carrying out the 
Plant Exchange, under the direction of Mrs. Ralph T. 
Starr, at which approximately 75 members exchanged 
the products of their horticultural activities. 

A total of 800 members visited gardens in Haddon- 
field and on the Main Line in May and June of this 
year. Needless to say this privilege would be im- 
possible without the planning of a large Committee 
chairmaned by Joseph B. Townsend, Jr., and the 
extremely hard work on the part of the members 
whose gardens were open. (cont'd) ))))) > 



PRUNING REMINDERS-(Cont'd) 

The Ijasic principle behind hedge building is to 
force the plants to develop as many side branches as 
possible along every twig. This is achieved by 
cutting back each year's growth from 50% to 75% 
of its length, or even more. In this manner the result- 
ing plants become a nearly solid mass of branches 
and twigs. The result is a tough, durable structure. 
Even hemlock, which is often considered difficult to 
control in size, can be maintained indefinitely in a 
three to four foot hedge if properly pruned.. 

While many horticulturists condemn California 
privet because of its rapid growth, it is amazing how 
many excellent hedges of this material are to be seen 
in the Philadelphia suburbs. The best of these always 
reveal, upon examination, a dense, well branched 
structure from the base to the top. 

HOLLY 

If the long shoots on holly are cut back during 
the summer the fruit clusters are much more con- 
spicuous in winter. It is a standard practice in a 
large holly orchard in New Jersey to clip the new 
growth back nearly its full length in summer. When 
the holly is harvested in winter the fruit clusters are 
near the tips of branches rather than hidden beneath 
the long terminal shoots. 

Although pruning for certain effects is best done 
during definite periods, pruning is not always con- 
trolled by hard and fast rules. If, for instance, you 
have pines, yews and some broadleaf evergreens 
which you like to use for Christmas decorating, there 
is really no major reason why you cannot do your 
pruning in December to take advantage of the harvest 
from your own garden. As in all other garden prac- 
tices, however, a basic knowledge of how each plant 
grows is important if you are to maintain it success- 
fully. 

Articles contributed to the NEWS so far this 
year include "Clematis," by Mrs, Charles Piatt; "Ca- 
mellias," by \Villiam Frederick, and a panel of lawn 
experts including John E. Gallagher, Dr. Walter S. 
Lapp. William Green, William H. White and Barbara 
Emerson (Mrs. Mark F. Emerson) helped to compile 
our "Lawn Program" which appeared in the April 
NEWS. 

As the Society embarks on new activities, new 
programs and a new future we will be calling on many 
more members. We welcome suggestions and offers 
lor assistance in any phase of our work. You also can 
help by telling your friends and neighbors about the 
Society and by urging them to become members. 



Henry D. Mirick, 
President 



» 



NEW BOOKS TO BORROW FROM THE LIBRARY 



I 



Green days in garden and landscape by Desmond 
iMuirhead. Miramar, 1961. 272 pp., illus. $7.95. 
Mr. IMuirhead, landscape architect, entertainingly, 
critically and authoritatively covers the vast field 
of landscape design from history of garden design to 
costs for i^rofessioiial advice, aesthetics, structural 
units, specific living areas, ornaments, construction, 
plant materials and maintenance. The author puts the 
reader in the frame of mind which will allow him 
properly to embark on improving the landscape, 
whether it be his own small property, city or national 
park. Required reading for all gardeners. 

The Saturday morning gardener; a guide to easy 
maintenance by Donald Wyman. Macmillan, 1962. 
viii. 235 pp., illus. $7.50. 

Every gardener who has read articles and pre- 
vious books by Dr. Wyman knows that he offers 
sound professional advice. This book covers garden 
planning, mulching, weed killers and qrther new 
devices for gardeners who need to keep expenses at a 
minimum. Many perennials, ground covers, bulbs and 
small trees are discussed with emphasis on their ease 
of maintenance, killing pond weeds, lawn 'substitues', 
pruning, chemicals and also plants requiring mainte- 
nance work. 

The home owners' tree book; a plain-spoken manual 
for non-professional tree lovers by John Stuart 
Martin. Doubleday, 1962. 165 pp., 16 pis. illus. 
$3.95. 

Mr. Martin writes : "Home is where your trees 
are, and giving them care is as worthwhile as keeping 
your home in repair; in fact even more so. Trees 
grow in value. Houses can only obsolesce." The 
author sets forth the basics of tree physiology, growth, 
care, culture and values. Adequate references to books 
on tree identification and care are also given for the 
gardener who wishes to delve into the subject more 
thoroughly. Recommended for the new and old 
home owner. 

Gardening' in the shade rev. ed. by Harriet K. Morse. 

Scribner's, 1962. xiii, 242 pp., illus. $5.95. 

It is good to have this too long out-of-print book 
revised (1st ed. published in 1939). It includes plants 
to grow in full, light and half shade (these condi- 
tions are defined in the book) depending on soil and 
ecological conditions, individual locations such as 
window boxes and city gardens and a "Who's Who" 
in the shade. Particuluarly written for gardeners in 
the region which includes the Delaware Valley, this 
book helps to answer one of the more baflfling prob- 
lems . . . what to do with shaded sites. 

Outdoor gardening in pots and boxes by George 
Taloumis. Van Nostrand, 1962. xi, 235 pp., illus. 
8 col. pis. $5.95. 
A modern treatment for growing various kinds 



of plants in containers, including potting mixtures 
and maintenance, from the author's own experiences 
and his contacts made while travelling in the United 
States and Europe. The final chapter "City Beautifi- 
cation with Boxes and Planters" discusses the projects, 
methods and what has been achieved in Philadelphia 
through work of The Neighborhood Garden Associa- 
tion and similar urban projects in Maine, New York, 
Pittsburgh, etc. The author is known in gardening 
circles for his articles in horticultural magazines, 
newspaper columns and lectures. 

Pageant of the rose ed. 2 by Jean Gordon. Red Rose 
Publications, 1961. 232 pp., illus. col. pis. $6.50. 
The first edition (1953) was very popular and now 
the book again is available. While there are no 
changes in the text of the revised edition, certain 
plates have been deleted but others added, also, the 
revised edition contains more woodcuts than the 
first. The rose in romance, legend, cookery, customs, 
fashion, gardens, prose and poetry, fairy tales, art, 
religion and symbolism is fascinatingly told in this 
book. The author is well known for her other contri- 
butions to rose history and her permanent Rose 
Museum in Saint Augustine, Florida. 

The art of training plants by Ernesta Drinker Ballard. 
Harper & Bros.. 1962. 128 pp., illus. $4.75 
Mrs. Ballard, a member of the Council of the 
Horticultural Society and a garden clinic instructor, 
writes about the plants she grows in her house, green- 
house and on her garden terrace. While interest in 
traditional bonsai has grown at an exceedingly fast 
rate in this country in recent years, the hardy plants 
usually grown as such have limited use for many 
indoor-outdoor gardeners. Mrs. Ballard has succeeded 
in applying the technique of controlling form and 
size to a wide range of indoor plants. She has pruned 
and trained them so that they become more important 
as objects of beauty. This is a far cry from the 
homely-sounding "houseplants" of old. Many of our 
members who have read Mrs. Ballard's authoritative 
Garden in your house will find this book a useful and 
welcome sequel. 

Best of show in flower arrangements compiled bj' 

Margaret Harold with comments by Bob Thomas. 

Allied Publ., 1961. 40 pp., col. pis. ports. $1.95. 

Paper. 

Tri-color, award of distinction and blue ribbon 
winners from 80 top shows in the United States during 
the Spring 1961 competitions. (An arrangement by 
our member, Mrs. Harry C. Groome, Jr., from our 
1961 Daffodil Show is included.) The aim of this work 
is to stimulate and guide flower arrangers. 

Plant hardiness zone map; a guide to the selection 
of plants according to their climate requirements 

(continued next page) 



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GARDEN CLINICS 

The Clinics Committee is planning two special 
events for summer stay-at-homes which are scheduled 
for cool early evening hours. 

On July 11th Martha Ludes Garra will conduct 
an outdoor clinic on the grounds of the Ambler Cam- 
pus. Temple University, at Ambler. Mrs. Garra will 
identify and discuss trees, shrubs, and herbaceous 
plants, explaining their cultural needs and how to use 
many of them in the home garden. 

On August 15th Ernesta Drinker Ballard will 
conduct a tour of the Morris Arboretum in Chestnut 
Hill. Mrs. Ballard will concentrate on trees and 
shrubs most suited for the garden. This is also a 
splendid opportunity to see mature specimens of 
many ornamentals. 

Registration is limited to 15 for each of these 
clinics, so please register early. 



NEW BOOKS -(cont'd) 



Register by using the clip-out coupon. Please enclose check and 
mail to .^89 Suburban Station. Phila. 3. Registrations accepted in the 
order received: confirmation by return post card. 



GARDEN CLINIC REGISTRATION 

Please register me for the Garden Clinic : 
n July 11 TOUR OF 

AMBLER CAMPUS 

($2.00 per member) 
D July 17 & 21 PROPAGATION 

($4.00 per member) 
n August 15 TOUR OF 

MORRIS ARBORETUM 

($2.00 per member) 



1 



Name - 

Address 

Telephone 



compiled by Theodore A. Weston and Gretchen 
Harshbarger. American Home, 1%2. 8 pp., in- 
cluding two page color map. 50c 

This useful list and map is available to members 
in the Society Library. 



DATES To Mark On Your CALENDAR 

JULY 11 (Wednesday) Ambler. Penna. 6:00 P.M. 

HORTICULTURAL TOUR OF AMBLER CAMPUS 

Martha Ludes Garra 

JULY 17 (Tuesday) 389 Suburban Station 7:00 P.M. 

PROPAGATION - FIRST OF TWO-PART CLINIC 

Mary Milton Martin 

JULY 21 (Saturday) Ambler, Penna. 2:00 P.M. 

PROPAGATION - SECOND OF TWO-PART CLINIC 

Mary Milton Martin 

AUGUST IS (Wednesday) Chestnut Hill 6:00 P.M. 

HORTICULTURAL TOUR OF MORRIS ARBORETUM 

Ernesta Drinker Ballard 



This issue of the NEWS is for July and 
August ; the September issue will be mailed 
on or about August 20. 



■■.:•: , ^ . r.i'- ' ■ 










THE PENNSYLVANIA 
SOCIETY 


iP^l 


VOl 


.. Ill No 

J 


\ 
■ 


1 SEPTEMBER, 1962 


1617 PENNSYLVANIA BOULEVARD 
_fHILADELPHIA 3. PENNSYLVANIA 


^ 


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A^VVi3 



THE NOT SO SILENT SPRING 



Rachel Carson's "The Silent Spring", which ap- 
peared in three issues of The New Yorker (June 16, 
23, 30) and is scheduled for publication in book form 
in October by Houghton Mififlin Company, has stirred 
up a summer storm of protest among responsible 
horticulturists, agriculturists and scientists. Many 
members of The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society 
have expressed a feeling of shock after having read 
Miss Carson's treatise on insecticides and herbicides 
because the articles imply that any one who has ever 
used chemical pest control materials has contributed 
to upsetting the "balance of nature". Her vehemence 
makes good reading and will have widespread reper- 
cussions, a.nd because The Silent Spring has been 
chosen as an October selection by the Book-of-the- 
Month Club, it will, no doubt, enjoy a large 
distribution. 

There are a few factors which we feel must be 
pointed out because it is too easy to become emotion- 
ally involved with what Miss Carson has written and 
to miss some of the hard facts of life in our time. 

First of all, the author gives the impression that 
scientists, especially those who have been involved 
in pest control research, are a radical, non-thinking, 
irresponsible group. This is not so. 

Another point which must be recognized is that 
the "balance of nature", of which Miss Carson sings in 
swan song notes, is a term which has been much 
over used by certain groups who would have us 
return to some sort of life as it once was. Civilization, 
by its very character, is upsetting to nature. Man 
long ago upset things when he first cleared land and 
planted crops. In time these gardens developed into 
vast acreages of one kind of plant such as wheat, 
corn, potatoes or apples. While Miss Carson recog- 
nizes this factor, she does not give enough attention 
to it as an artificial situation requiring artificial tech- 
niques if the harvest is to be assured. Birds cannot 
control beetles in a 200 acre potato field, the codling 
moths in a fifty acre apple orchard or the boll weevils 
in a hundred acre planting of cotton. 

Without pesticides it would be impossible to 
feed 180 million Americans and a large segment of 
the world's population in addition to our own. A 
single farmer must produce not only enough to feed 
his own family but enough to feed twenty-eight other 



individuals as well. He can do this only because 
modern farming techniques make it possible, and 
modern pesticides are a part of the technique. 

Miss Carson abhors the loss of shelter for wild- 
life caused by the spraying of weedkillers along road- 
sides. Everyone recognizes that grassy road embank- 
ments are a safety factor necessary to increased 
vision. Weedkillers provide an economical and effec- 
tive method of controlling these hazards and for better 
or for worse, this is necessary to our way of life. How- 
ever, only a small portion of wildlife cover is lost as 
the result of such spraying. Far more is destroyed 
when vast acreages are cleared for housing develop- 
ments and wildernesses are torn apart for super high- 
ways ; these also are necessary to our civilization. 

A major point which Miss Carson brings out, 
and rightly so, is that many of the modern garden 
chemicals are dangerous to handle. This is true, but 
so are many other materials. The author cites several 
examples of death or severe illness because of acci- 
dents involving users of some of these materials, but 
she does not tell how many thousands of individuals 
have handled pest control materials without injury to 
themselves. Miss Carson also does not point out the 
difference between the toxicity of a material and the 
hazards of using it. Toxicity is inherent; a material 
is very poisonous, mildly poisonous or not poisonous. 
Hazard involves the how, when, where and how much 
of its use. Intelligence demands that insecticides, 
fungicides and herbicides be handled with extreme 
diligence. Even the remotest possibility of accident 
must be anticipated. (As an example, the largest fish 
kill in the Delaware River occurred when a farmer left 
a bag of insecticide in a field overnight and the 
material was carried into the stream during a cloud- 
burst.) 

It is vastly important that anyone using any pest 
control materials follow directions exactly as printed 
on the label and to use them only when necessary 
and only to the extent necessary. Spraying should 
never become a Saturday morning ritual. Only in 
this way can hazard be reduced to a minimum, not 
only to man, but to all living organisms. 

A marine biologist, Miss Carson wrote The Sea 
Around Us with obvious love. It is an outstanding 

(continued on page 3) 



SPECIAL SYMPOSIUM SCHEDULED 



QUALITY DAFFODILS 



A special fall garden symposium is scheduled for 
Hershey, Pa. on September 22. The all day program 
includes five speakers, a luncheon, and judged luncheon 
table decorations by members of the garden clubs 
of the Harrisburg area. Detailed programs including 
registration forms were mailed to all members of The 
Pennsylvania Horticultural Society in August. 

Mrs. Harry S. Withers of Camp Hill, Pa., Chair- 
man of the event, will open the day at 10:00 A.M. and 
will introduce Henry D. Mirick, President of the 
Society, who will greet all attending. Speakers and 
topics on the program include : "Rx for an Interesting 
Autumn Garden" by 'Lois Woodward Paul, Director 
of Short Courses, Longwood Gardens; "No-Nonsense 
Lawns" by Barbara H. Emerson, Research Associate, 
Amchem Products Inc. ; "Roses — Yesterday and To- 
day" by Richard Thomson, author of Old Ros^s for 
Modern Gardens ; "Do You Really Want a Greenhouse?" 
by Ernesta Drinker Ballard, author of Garden in Your 
House and the Art of Training Plants; (Mr. Thomson 
and Mrs. Ballard are also members of the Council of 
The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society) ; and "Garden 
Design on a Budget" by Carlton B. Lees, Director of 
the Society and author of Budget Landscaping. 

Registration fees include luncheon and are $4.00 
for members ; $6.00 for all others. Facilities are limited, 
so it is urged that registrations be made as early as 
possible. 



outstanding daffodil varieties selected 

by a panel of experts, for Greater Delaware Valley 
gardens. 

(Price Range: $1 - $3 for most, a (ew may be more) 



Yellow trumpets (la) 



Large cups, white (2c) 



Bastion 


Ave 


Counsellor 


Dew-pond 


Luna Moth 


Dunfane 


Milanion 


Kibo 


Moonstruck 


Olivet 


Ulster Prince 


Pigeon 




St. Brendan 




Tornamona 


Bicolor trumpets (lb) 


Zero 


Frolic 




Lapford 




Preamble 


Small cups, self yellow (3a) 


Straight 






Ardour 


White trumpets (Ic) 




Vigil 


Small cups, bicolor (3b) 




Bithynia 


Reverse bicolor trumpets (Id) 


Carnmoon 




Corncrake 


Spellbinder 


Fairy Tale 




Masaka 



YOSHIMURA TO INAUGURATE 
LECTURE SERIES 

Yuji Yoshimura, internationally recognized Bonsai 
specialist, will open The Pennsylvania Horticultural 
Society's winter lecture series on Monday, October 29 
at the Commercial Museum. The Society is cooperat- 
ing with the Museum in presenting Mr. Yoshimura in 
connection with a new exhibition, "Shibui, the Calm 
Beauty of Japan" which opens on October 12 and con- 
tinues through November 18. The Japan Today galler- 
ies have been refurbished for the event. 

Admission to the lecture will be by ticket only 
(available to members upon request at no cost) ; 
details will appear in the October issue of the NEWS. 



Large cups, yellow (2a) 

Armada 
Ceylon 

Court Martial 
Fox Hunter 
Home Fires 
Sun Chariot 



Large cups, bicolor (2b) 

Arbar 

Blarney's Daughter 

Buncrana 

Daviot 

Festivity 

Green Island 

Hopesay 

King Cardinal 

My Love 

Statue 

Tryst 

Tudor Minstrel 



Small cups, white (3c) 

Altyre 
Dallas 
Portrush 



Doubles (4) 

Double Event 
Snowball 
Swansdown 
White Lion 



Triandrus (5) 

Forty-Niner 
Frosty Morn 
Thoughtful 



GIFT FROM LONGWOOD GARDENS 

Longwood Gardens has given a very practical and 
useful gift of about 400 feet of library shelving to the 
Horticultural Society. It has made possible the ex- 
pansion of our over-crowded library and provides 
efificient storage for many flower show supplies. 



Large cups, pink (2b) 

Interim 
Pink Isle 
Pink Lace 
Radiation 
Rose of Tralee 



Cyclamineus (6) 

Charity May 
Dove Wings 
Jenny 
Roger 



LANDSCAPE SCHOOL - COURSE I 

The Garden Club Federation of Pennsylvania in 
cooperation with The Pennsylvania Horticultural 
Society, is offering Course I of the series of four 
courses in Landscape Design on Monday and Tuesday, 
October 15-16, 1962, in the 8th floor Auditorium of 
Straw-bridge & Clothier, 8th and Market Streets, 
Philadelphia. (Examinations on October 17.) 

The entire course of study includes lectures on 
maximum use of property, means and methods of 
gardening, materials of gardens, and public and com- 
munal planning and planting. 

Students may or may not take the examination 
for credit. At the completion of the four courses, 
and passing examinations, the student will receive 
a Landscape Design Certificate from The National 
Council of State Garden Clubs. 

Speakers appearing on the program are : Frederick 
Blau, Delaware Valley College of Science and Agri- 
culture; Carlton B. Lees, Director, Pennsylvania 
Horticultural Society; Karl Linn, Assistant Professor 
of Landscape Architecture, University of Pennsyl- 
vania; H. Stuart Ortloff, Landscape Architect; and 
Wayne H. Wilson, Professor of Landscape Architec- 
ture, Pennsylvania State University. 

Registration may be made with Mrs. William A. 
Hett, 425 Alliston Road, Springfield (Delaware Coun- 
ty), Pa. Registration fees for the complete course 
are $12.50 (before October 1) and $15.00 after that 
date. Single, half day sessions $4.00 each. 



SPECIAL BEGONIA PRIZE OFFERED 

The Wm. Penn Branch, American Begonia 
Society will award a special prize of $25.00 for the 
best specimen begonia plant entered in the horticul- 
tural classes of The Pennsylvania Horticultural 
Society section of the 1963 Philadelphia Flower Show. 
Any variety and/or type is accepted ; plants must have 
been in the possession of the exhibitor for at least 
six months before the Show (March 10-16, 1963), 
and must be growing and shown in a 5-inch pot. 



SILENT SPRING-(cont'd) 

work, but in The Silent Spring we feel that she has 
found an issue which she has over embroidered and 
over sentimentalized. While she points out the dangers 
of which we should be aware, hers is a one sided 
viewpoint. 

Most serious of all is Miss Carson's charge that 
the actions of modern chemicals are irreversible. All 
forms of life are interdependent, and we cannot con- 
tinually destroy fnore than we rebuild. If Rachel 
Carson has made m more conscious of this fact, she 
will have accomplished much. 



CHRYSANTHEMUM SHOW 
LOCATION CHANGED 

Due to an unforeseen conflict in scheduling, the 
Chrysanthemum Show will not be staged in the 
American Baptist Convention, Valley Forge, as was 
announced in the May issue of the NEWS. This is 
an unfortunate development because the building 
offers an unusual opportunity to stage a distinctive 
show. For this year, the show will return to the 
Stewart Armory in Norristown. 

NEW SECTION 

A new section has been added to this year's show 
schedule. Open only to professional gardeners, the 
new section calls for chrysanthemums grown outdoors 
or under glass. A special trophy in memory of Charles 
Starn will be presented by The F. A. Bartlett Tree 
Expert Company to the best entry in this section. 

ARRANGEMENTS 

Ten arrangement classes provide a variety of 
themes, but probably one of the most interesting is 
the class in which a tokonoma will be furnished to 
each of the arrangers. The tokonomas are 60 inches 
high, 47 inches wide and 18 inches deep. The class 
is limited to four entries. 

BONSAI MUMS 

A group of members interested in bonsai, are 
applying this technique to small flowered varieties 
of chrysanthemums. A favorite method of the Japan- 
ese, it is hoped that our members will have good 
success so that their plants will be in bloom for the 
show. 

The Chrysanthemum Show is sponsored jointly 
by The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society, The Men's 
Chrysanthemum Club of Norristown and the Phila- 
delphia Branch, National Association of Gardeners. 
Nathan H. Wolf, Jr. is Show Chairman and Mrs. 
George Makin, 111, is Arrangement Chairman. 

Schedules have been mailed to previous exhibi- 
tors; anyone else wishing to receive the show schedule 
may obtain it by writing or telephoning (LO 3-8352) 
the Horticultural Society. 



MEMBERS' EVENINGS TO CONTINUE 

Last year the Horticultural Society inaugurated 
a new series of very informal programs for members 
on the first Tuesday of each month. These sessions 
had an average attendance of forty people. Because 
of the size of the groups and the informality of the 
situation, members had the opportunity to exchange 
ideas about the garden topic of the evening. 

Mrs. H. Rowland Timms, Chairman, has an- 
nounced that the 1962-63 series will be launched at 
7:30 P.M. on Tuesday, October 2, when members 
are invited to bring in five of their favorite slides of 
plants, gardens, or related subject matter. Projection 
equipment is supplied by the Society. The library 
will open at 6:30 for the convenience of members 
wishing to make use of its facilities. 



NEW BOOKS TO BORROW FROM THE LIBRARY 



Complete guide to hardy perennials by Frances Perry. 
Branford, 1958. 288 pp. illus. 40 col. pis. 16 b & w 
pis. $5.95. 

Dr. John Wister writes about the paucity of differ- 
ent species of perennials now being used by gardeners 
in a recent issue of the Bulletin of the Horticultural 
Society of New York and states that "... there are 
not enough people who want unusual plants." This 
book on perennials is an excellent reference for 
gardeners interested in more than the ordinary list. 

Miniature plants for home and greenhouse by Elvin 
McDonald. Van Nostrand, 1962. xi, 273 pp. illus. 
$5.95. 

The author is well qualified to write a book of 
this nature and the topic is becoming increasingly 
popular. A garden dictionary for small plants which 
also includes a list of suppliers. 

Miniature chrysanthemums and Koreans and Gladioli 
and the miniatures are two books written by Roy 
Genders and published by St. Martin's in 1961 ($4.50 
and $4.95). Both books contain culture information 
about numerous varieties. 

Delphiniums for everyone by Stuart Ogg. London, 
Blandford, 1961 (distrib. by Branford). 96 pp. 
12 cols. pis. 15 b & w pis. $2.95. 

An introductory guide for delphinium gardeners 
primarily in England. Practical information may be 
interpreted in this readable book by American 
gardeners. 

Make friends of trees and shrubs by Alma C. Guillet ; 
foreword by Harold W. Rickett. Doubleday, 1962. 
285 pp. illus. $4.50. 

The author-naturalist gives botanical data about 
each tree and shrub and also tells of the legends and 
folklore that have come to be associated with them. 
Her book ends with a history of Central Park which 
she knows so well. 

Simple, practical hybridizing for beginners by D. 

Gourlay Thomas. St. Martin's, 1962. 127 pp. 
illus. $3.95. 

A good book for gardeners with little horticultural 
training but anxious to try growing their own new 
kinds of plants. 

The feature garden by H. L. V. Fletcher. Branford, 
1961. 142 pp. illus. 17 pis. $3.50. 

Ideas and information about garden ornaments, 
design and construction. This small book is written 
by a British gardener. 

The study of flowers made simple by Wm. C. Grimm, 
Jr. Doubleday (Made Simple Books), 1962. 152 
pp. illus. paper. $1.45. 

An elementary introduction to the study of 
flowering plants. 



Seed identification manual by Alexander C. Martin 
and William D. Barkley. University California 
Press, 1961. 221 pp. illus. $10.00. 

Basic reference tool for any work in identification 
of seeds from plants growing in these three areas : 
farmlands, wetlands and woodlands. Well illustrated. 

Biology Studies — aimed to provide a summary 
of recent significant research findings. Three books 
so far published in this series by Holt, Rinehart and 
Winston are : The physiology of flowering by William 
S. Hillman (1962, 164 pp. $4.50), Comparative plant 
anatomy ; a guide to taxonomic and evolutionary appli- 
cation of anatomical data in angiosperms by Sherwin J. 
Carlquist (1961, 146 pp. $5.00), and Translocation in 
plants by Alden S. Crafts (1961, 182 pp. $5.00). Each 
book contains important material for the informed 
horticulturist. 

Plants; an introduction to modern botany by V. A. 
Greulach and J. E. Adams. Wiley, 1962. xvi, 557 
pp. Illus. $7.50. 

A good up-to-date text book which emphasizes the 
need for an understanding of chemistry, covers all 
basic botanical concepts from ecology to economic 
botany and gives the principles for growing and 
propagating plants. 

Letters of the Lewis and Clark Expedition; with 
related documents 1783-1854 ed. by Donald Jack- 
son. University Illinois Press, 1962. xxi, 728 pp. 
16 pis. map route on end papers. $10.00. 

These letters by early Philadelphia horticulturists 
concerning the collecting of plants for cultivation on 
the Lewis and Clark Expedition never before have 
appeared in print. Interesting events are revealed 
in this book which are expertly edited by Donald 
Jackson. It also contains a good bibliography for 
readers interested in knowing more about the plants 
collected on this trip. 

Beloved botanist; the story of Carl Linnaeus by A. 
Stoutenburg and L. N. Baker. Scribner's, 1961. 
192 pp. port. $2.95. 

Older boys and girls will enjoy reading about 
the life of Carl Linnaeus, father of modern system- 
atic botany and a man who had many students. 

Young America's garden book by Louise Bush-Brown, 
illus. by James Bush-Brown. Scribner's, 1962. 
vi, 281 pp. illus. $4.50. 

The art, craft, and science of gardening are all 
introductory chapters in this book which are followed 
by 31 well-planned exciting projects. Parents contin- 
ually referring to the Bush-Browns' America's Garden 
Book will find their children doing the same with this 
new book Mrs. Bush-Brown has carefully written. 
Recommended for young people from ages 10-14. 

(continued next page) 



NEW GARDEN CLINICS ANNOUNCED 

Mrs. J. J. Willaman, Chairman of the Garden 
Clinics Committee, announces several innovations in 
this fall's schedule. In September, two clinics will 
focus attention on preparing for the competitive hor- 
ticultural classes in the 1963 Philadelphia Flower Show 
(see NEWS, June 1962), and a two session Clinic 
will be devoted to the propagation of evergreens. A 
series of four clinics in October will make up an in- 
tensive short course on trees and shrubs for the 
garden, and a November series will be devoted to in- 
door gardening. Two clinics will be given in Woods- 
town, N. J. This is the first of a series scheduled for 
the convenience of members outside the Greater Phila- 
delphia area. 

A two session clinic on the fall propagation of 
evergreens will be conducted by Mary Milton Martin, 
Staff Horticulturist. The first will be a lecture and 
the second a workshop in which registered members 
will make cuttings. All materials except flats will 
be provided. 

The first of the clinics designed to help Philadel- 
phia Flower Show exhibitors will be devoted to the 
forced bulb classes and will be conducted by Mrs. 
Rowland Timms, past Regional Vice President of the 
American Daffodil Society and a member of the 
Council of The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society. 

Ernesta Drinker Ballard (Mrs. Frederic L. Bal- 
lard, Jr.) is the instructor for the second clinic which 
will help exhibitors prepare for the Flower Show. 
She will concentrate on bonsai, topiary ivy, hanging 
baskets, and other classes included in the 1963 show 
schedule. 

Martha Ludes Garra (Mrs. Edward J. Garra) is 
the instructor for a comprehensive short course on 
trees and shrubs for the garden. This series will con- 
sist of three indoor sessions and a field trip in October. 
Selection, uses, culture and other factors will be 
discussed and plants observed on the field trip. 

Mrs. Balla'-d will teach a November series of three 
clinics on gardening indoors and will also be instructor 
for the two Woodstown, N. J. clinics, on indoor plants 
and espaliered plants on October 3. For registration 
information, Woodstown Clinics, write or telephone 
(LO 3-8352) the Society. 

Mrs. Burton Zehner of Woodstown, N. J., is the 
Horticultural Society's Representative for the clinics 
there and is assisting in making arrangements for the 
event. The Society is anxious to expand its Garden 
Clinic program for gardeners throughout the New 
Jersey, Delaware, and Pennsylvania area. Members 
who would like to assist in this program by helping 
to obtain facilities for Garden Clinics in their home 
area, are urged to write to the Society. 



NEW BOOKS -(cont'd) 

Her garden was her delight by Buckner HoUingsworth. 
Macmillan, 1962. ix, 166 pp. $4.00. 

Well written but short bibliographies of twenty 
widely known American and British women horticul- 
turists, botanists and one botanical illustrator. The 
arrangement is chronological thus giving an evolu- 
tionary approach. 

Starting a terrarium by Miriam Gilbert, illus. bj' W. 
Ferguson and others. C. S. Hammond, 1961. 
45 pp. col. illus. $1.00. 

A children's book about plants and animals for 
growing, caring for and observation in a terrarium. 

Our garden friends the bugs; who they are and how 
they help us by Allan W. Forbes, illus. by Lili 
Rethi. Exposition, 1962. 190 pp. Illus. $4.00. 

Many books and articles tell how to get rid of 
harmful insects; this book discusses the beneficial ones. 



Gifts to the Library recently have been from Mrs. 
Frederic Ballard, Jr., Miss A. B. White, Albert F. W. 
Vick, Jr., Miss Ann Waterman and Dr. E. D. Rudolph. 
The Library readers are always grateful for contri- 
butions. 



GARDEN CLINICS 

SEPTEMBER 11 (Tuesday) 

15 (Saturday) 

THE FALL PROPAGATION OF EVERGREENS 



10:30 A.M. 
2:00 P.M. 



Mary Milton Martin, Instructor 

Members will have the opportunity to learn about 
the theories of fall propagation of evergreens in the 
first session and to make actual cuttings in the second. 
The first will be at 389 Suburban Station Bldg., the 
second, at the Ambler Campus, Temple Univ. Regis- 
tration includes all materials except flats. No registra- 
tion accepted for a single session. 

SEPTEMBER 19 (Wednesday) 10:00 A.M. 

389 Suburban Station Building 

FORCING BULBS FOR HOME AND SHOW 

Mrs. H. Rowland Timms will discuss and demon- 
strate the culture of flowering bulbs in pots for indoor 
garden and, in particular, for flower show competition. 

SEPTEMBER 26 (Wednesday) 10:30 A.M. 

389 Suburban Station Building 

GROWING FLOWER SHOW PLANTS 

Ernesta Drinker Ballard will discuss the culture 
of plants for the Philadelphia Flower Show other 
than forced bulbs. 

(continued on page 6) 



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GARDEN CLINICS-(cont'd) 

OCTOBER 4, n, 18, 25 10:30 A.M. 

389 Suburban Station Building 

TREES AND SHRUBS IN YOUR GARDEN 

A four part Clinic (the last session a field trip) 
conducted by Martha Ludes Garra, in which she will 
present a comprehensive treatment of her subject 
including selecting, growing, and maintaining these 
woody plants to advantage. 

Register by using the clip-out coupon. Please enclose check and 
mail to 389 Suburban Station. Phila. S. Registrations accepted in the 
order received; confirmation by return post card. 

GARDEN CLINIC REGISTRATION 

PJease register me for the following: 

n September 11, 15 THE FALL 

PROPAGATION OF EVERGREENS 
($5.00 per member for the series of two) 

Q September 19 FORCING BULBS 
($2.00 per member) 

n September 26 GROWING FLOWER 
SHOW PLANTS 
($2.00 per member) 

n October 4, 11, 18, 25 TREES AND 
SHRUBS IN YOUR GARDEN 
($10.00 per member for the series of four) 



Name 



Address 

Telephone 




DATES To Mark On Your CALENDAR 

SEPTEMBER 11 & 15 GARDEN CLINIC Tues. 10:30 A.M. 
PROPAGATION Sat. 2:00 P.M. 
(Advance registration necessary) 

SEPTEMBER 19 GARDEN CLINIC: FORCING BULBS 10 :00 A.M. 
(Advance registration necessary) 

SEPTEMBER 22 FALL GARDEN DAY, HERSHEY, PA. 

(Advance registration necessary) 

SEPTEMBER 26 GARDEN CLINIC 10:30 A.M. 

GROWING FLOWER SHOW PLANTS 

(Advance registration necessary) 

OCTOBER 2 MEMBERS' EVENING 7:30 P.M. 

389 Suburban Station Building 

OCTOBER 3 GARDEN QINICS 

Woodstown, N. J. 
(Advance registration necessary) 

OCTOBER 4, 11, 18, 25 GARDEN CLINIC 

TREES AND SHRUBS 10:30 A.M. 

(Advance registration necessary) 

OCTOBER 15 & 16 LANDSCAPE SCHOOL 

Strawbridge & Clothier Auditorium 

OCTOBER 29 BONSAI LECTURE 

Commercial Museum 

NOVEMBER 3 & 4 CHRYSANTHEMUM SHOW 

Stewart Armory, Norristown 



THE PENNSVLVANI^J 
HORTICULTURJ^P 
SOCIETY 


P^^^^l 


VOL III No. 

31 


9 


OCTOBER. 1962 


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PHILADELPHIA 3. PENNSYLVANIA 1 


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IS BIOLOGICAL CONTROL OF INSECTS ENOUGH? 



Almost everyone agrees that the natural control 
of an insect pest would be ideal ; however, the balance 
between a pest and its natural enemies is never static, 
and only rarely arei the natural enemies of an insect 
able to eliminate it. Even with the help of man, as in 
the battle against the Japanese beetle, the parasitic 
insects introduced from the Orient and the several 
diseases which attack the beetle grub in its winter. 
soil-inhabiting state, have been unable to eliminate 
this garden pest. 

The most important of the biological controls for 
Japanese beetles is the bacteria which causes milky 
disease of the grubs. When infected by these bacteria, 
the blood of the grub becomes milky white in 
appearance and eventually causes the death of the grub. 
After the body disintegrates, the spores remain in the 
soil to infect grubs which develop in the future, so once 
the soil is colonized with the spores, they remain 
almost indefinitely and continue to destroy beetle 
grubs year after year. 

A program to colonize milky disease bacteria was 
started in 1939 by entomologists at the Moorestown 
(N. J.) laboratory of the Entomology Research Divi- 
sion, United States Department of Agriculture. Con- 
ducted in cooperation with Federal and State agencies, 
the workers succeeded in colonizing nearly 94,000 acres 
(permanent turfs such as lawns, pastures, golf courses, 
meadows, etc.) in 14 eastern states and the District of 
Columbia. By 1953, virtually all of the Greater Dela- 
ware Valley had been colonized with milky disease. 
RESULTS 

According to the Moorestown laboratory, the 
milky disease has reduced the Japanese beetle popula- 
tion in the Delaware Valley from its once epidemic 
proportions and should prevent this pest from ever 
reaching such proportions again. Instead of finding 
fifty grubs per square foot of turf area, as was the case 
in the late 1920's, the grub population is now down to 
less than one per square foot. (In a carefully controlled 
test on a Stroudsburg, Pa. golf course, the grub popu- 
lation averaged 66 per square foot in 1942 before the 
milky disease spores were introduced; by 1949 the 
population was down to 1.7 grulis ])er s(|iiare foot.) 

Particularly interesting is the fact that about 



90% of the desperate appeals which come to the labo- 
ratory for help in controlling Japanese beetles, are 
from large housing developments, such as Levittown, 
where soil has been regraded and the milky disease 
spores removed and/or buried too deeply to be effec- 
tive. When new home owners establish new lawns in 
such areas, the beetle population climbs markedly. 

The Moorestown laboratory emphasized that bio- 
logical control of the beetle is not always sufficient 
to prevent the pest from damaging ornamentals and 
other garden plants. While it has made an extremel)' 
significant contribution and, only in specific areas, do 
grubs destroy lawns as they did in the past (the beetle 
grubs feed on grass roots), it still may be necessary to 
use chemical sprays to control the adult beetle. While 
biological controls may suppress populations of insect 
pests, they may not necessarily give 100% control, 
even where parasites and attacking bacteria are well 
established. 
CHEMICAL CONTROL 

The United States Department , of Agriculture 
recommends DDT, methoxychlor, malathion, rotenone 
or Sevin to control adult Japanese beetles. Of these, 
Sevin, is the newest. It is considered to be very low 
in mamalian toxicity while providing excellent control 
of the adult beetle at the same time. Without rain, 
Sevin will continue to kill beetles for nearly two weeks. 
It is easily washed off, however, and while this may 
be a disadvantage in the garden during a rainy spell, 
it is an advantage for food crops, many of which can 
be sprayed up to the day before harvest. 

When spraying with Sevin, or with any other 
chemical, be sure to spray only when and where neces- 
sary. There is no need to splash chemicals all over the 
earden. An alert gardener soon knows where and what 
the beetles are feeding upon and acts accordingly. 

Chlordane and DDT are related : they are persist- 
ant chemicals and for this reason they are effective for 
four or five years when applied to lawns to kill beetle 
grubs. If applied in late March or early April, these 
materials will reduce the grub (and resulting beetle) 
])0])ulation immediately. DDT and chlordane also elim- 
inate the mole prol)lem from lawns because the moles 
feed on grubs. 



The very persistence and thoroughness with which 
these materials eliminate the grubs is a drawback when 
one realizes that they are picked up by worms and 
other soil organisms which, in turn, might be eaten 
by robins and other birds. 
BIOLOGICAL CONTROL 

For the individual gardener to think in terms of 
introducing milky disease spores into his garden to 
gain control of Japanese beetles is impractical. The 
powder is expensive ($4-5.00 per pound) and it takes 
from 2 to 21 pounds to colonize an acre (at rates of 
application of one teaspoon at 10-foot intervals to one 
teaspoon at 3-foot intervals). The time required for 
the pathogen to become effective depends upon several 
factors, including the rate of application, density of 
grub population and temperature of the soil. Three to 
five years may elapse before the bacteria have spread 
throughout the lawn ; in the meantime, severe damage 
may appear where the bacteria is not present and the 
population of adult beetles will not have been appre- 
ciably diminished. 

The milky disease bacteria and DDT or chlordane 
should never be applied to the same turf. The insecti- 
cide keeps the grub population at a very low level for 
several years and will prevent the establishment and 
buildup of the pathogen. 

The colonization of the milky disease bacteria can 
be of definite value when neighbors join forces to re- 
duce the density of the beetle population in an area. 
The efforts of the individual alone may be futile. 
THE CHOICE 

In the Philadelphia area there are several new 
neighborhoods where Japanese beetles have become 
a severe problem because of the bulldozing away of 
the established parasites and beneficial disease spores. 
New lawns in which many people have invested a 
great deal of money and hours of hard work have been 
destroyed by beetle grul)s, and the adults appear in 
fist-sized clusters on roses, marigolds, raspberries and 
other garden plants. It is obvious that the natural 
enemies of the Japanese beetle should be reintroduced 
quickly. On the other hand, some immediate relief is 
called for. What is the choice? There are several: 

1. Douse everything, both grubs (turf) and adult 
beetles, with chemicals for quick relief. 

2. Introduce milky disease spores and go on living 
with a severe infestation for several years before the 
beetle population begins to diminish ; hand-pick adult 
beetles, reseed damaged portions of lawns annually. 

3. Introduce milky disease to the turf and spray (with 
caution and good judgment) only the adult beetles. 

4. Apply chemicals recommended to more important 
lawn areas, milky disease spores to others, less import- 
ant, on a neighborhood wide basis. Hand-pick beetles 
when and where possible (children are good at this 
for small rew.-in-l j and spray with caution only heav- 
ily infested, out of reach plants (grape vines, mountain 
ash to), during very heavy infestation or to protect 
pkuus when you are away from home. 



SPECIAL BUS EXCURSION SCHEDULED 

The opportunity to visit three places of excep- 
tional horticultural interest becomes available to mem- 
bers of The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society this 
autumn with the inauguration of bus tours to places 
more distant from Philadelphia than those usually in- 
cluded in the Garden Visits and the Walking Tours 
programs of the Society. The trips will take place on 
Saturdays to enable as many members as possible to 
take advantage of them. 

Bus reservations must l^e made in advance and 
facilities are limited, so it is urged that reservations 
are made early. Reservation includes bus fare only. 
Time and place will be allowed for luncheon ; no ad- 
mission charge is made to places visited. (See page 4 
for reservation form.) 

The New York Botanical Garden, one of the most 
famous in the world, is the destination of the first 
excursion. No matter what the season or the weather, 
there are always more than enough attractions to de- 
light gardening enthusiasts. If you haven't seen the 
Garden, or if some time has lapsecl since your last 
visit, here is the opportunity to see it at the height of 
its chrysanthemum display. Inexpensive lunches will 
be available in the recently restored Lorillard Snuff 
Mill on the bank of the Bronx River. 

Busses leave the Pennsylvania Blvd. entrance of 
Suburban Station Bldg., Saturday, October 20, 8:30 
A.M. (Expected return 6:30 P.M.) Fare: $6.00 for 
members; $8.(X) for guests. (Family memberships 
entitled to member's rate fares for each member of 
family.) 

The second autumn excursion is scheduled for 
the unusual holly orchard of the New Jersey Silica 
Sand Co. in Millville. N. J. This orchard of American 
hollies is particularly interesting not only for the 
maturity of the plants, but for the great variation in 
fruiting, foliage and growth habits which become 
evident only when a great number are brought to- 
gether. Mr. Daniel Fenton, Horticulturist, will conduct 
a short tour of the orchard and will speak to the group. 
Time will be allowed for members to brov^'se in the 
orchard and to see displays in the Holly House of 
objects made of holly wood and/or using holly as the 
decorative motif. 

Luncheon will be in Millville and a stop will be 
made at Koster Nurseries in Bridgeton. Koster is a 
division of Seabrook Farms and is one of the largest 
of the wholesale propagators and growers of ever- 
greens and azaleas in the U. S. 

Holly - Koster tour leaves Pennsylvania Blvd. en- 
trance. Suburban Station Bldg., Saturday, November 
17, 9:00 A.M. Return to Philadelphia, about 5:00 P.M. 
Transportation : $2.50 for members, $3.50 for guests 
(Famil}' Memberships entitled to menil)ers' rate fare 
for each member of family.) 



GARDEN CLINICS 

Mr. Yuji Yoshimura's presence in Philadelphia 
for a Pennsylvania Horticultural Society lecture on 
Monday, October 29. enables the Clinics Committee 
to arrano-e for two bonsai classes to be conducted by 
Mr. Yoshimura on Sunday, Octobr 28. This is a rare 
opportunity for bonsai enthusiasts to receive instruc- 
tion from an expert. Clinics will be held at the Com- 
mercial Museum. The Committee also calls to your 
attention two series: Trees and Shrubs in Your Gar- 
den and Indoor Gardening bj' the Society's regular 
instructcrs. (Registration coupon, page 4) 

OCTOBER 4, 11, 18, 25 10:30 A.M. 

389 Suburlian Station Building 

TREES AND SHRUBS IN YOUR GARDEN 

A comprehensive series to help participants to 
know, select, grow and maintain the important woody 
plants which make up the backbone of the garden 
and provide permanency. Field trip included. Martha 
Ludes Garra, Instructor. 

OCTOBER 28 (Sunday) 10:00 A.M. 

Commercial Museum 

BONSAI ■ ADVANCED 

Air. Yuji Yoshimura, will give help and criticism 
to advanced students of bonsai. Participants must 
bring own bonsai and tools for reworking plants; soil 
will be furnished. Class limited to ten members. 

OCTOBER 28 (Sunday) 7:00 P.M. 

t Commercial Museum 

BONSAI FOR BEGINNERS 
This is a beginner's class, but with Mr. Yoshi- 
mura's expertise, the participant goes home well in- 
formed and with a handsome bonsai, too! Instruction 
is given in fundamentals and registration fee includes 
all materials : Japanese bonsai container, plant, soil, 
moss, wire, etc. 

NOVEMBER 6, 13, 20 2:00 P.M. 

INDOOR GARDENING 

A series of three clinics designed to increase your 
knowledge about gardening indoors. Temperature, 
light, water and selection of plants will be considered. 
Ernesta Drinker Ballard, Instructor. 



MEMBERS' EVENINGS 

Members are invited to bring in five or six of their 
favorite slides of plants, gardens and related subjects 
to show to other members on Tuesday, October 2, 
7:30 P.M. This will be a very informal program in 
which each person will have the opportunity to share 
experiences and to learn what others are doing in both 
gardening and photography. Projection equipment for 
2x2 (35 mm) slides will be provided. 

On Tuesday, November 6, Mrs. George deCoursey, 
of Paoli. will discuss the what, why and how-to of 
birds in the garden — bird attracting plants, feeders, 
what birds to look for and when. 

The library opens at 6:.30 P.M. on these evenings 
fur the convenience of members. 



TICKETS NECESSARY 
FOR YOSHIMURA LECTURE 

Yuji Yoshimura, internationally recognized Bonsai 
specialist, will op^^n The Pennsylvania Horticultural 
Society's winter lecture series on Monday, October 29 
at the Commercial Museum. The Society is cooperating 
with the Museum in presenting Mr. Yoshimura in 
connection with a new exhibition, "Shibui, the Calm 
Beauty of Japan" which opens on October 12 and 
continues through December 31. The Japan Today 
galleries have been refurbished for the event and a 
Japanese dry garden has been added. Also on display 
is an extensive new exhibition on contemporary 
architecture. 

Admission to the lecture will he by ticket only. 
Tickets for members and guests may be obtained by 
writing or telephoning the Society (LO 3-8352). There 
is no charge for the tickets. Facilities are limited, so be 
sure to get your request in early. 

Mr. Yoshimura will appear on the Red Benson 
Show (WPEN, 11:30 P.M., Saturday, October 27) 
and briefly on the Today Show (WRCV-TV, 7:25 
A.M., Monday, October 29). On Stinday he will con- 
duct two Bonsai clinics for members of the Society. 

NEW HOURS FOR LECTURES 

Because many members of the Horticultural So- 
ciety find it impossible to attend afternoon lectures, 
the Lecture Committee has decided to introduce an 
innovation in this winter's lecture program. One lec- 
ture will be presented in November, at 8:00 P.M., and 
one in January at 6:30 P.M. Both will be in the audi- 
torivim of the Academy of Natural Sciences of 
Philadelphia. 

On November 20, 8:00 P.M., Prof. Robert S. 
Reich of Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, La., 
will speak on gardening as an art. Details will appear 
in the November NEWS. On January 16, 6:30 P.M., 
Dr. Patricia Allison, Plant Pathologist, Morris Arbora- 
tum, will speak on the control of garden disease and 
insect pests. 



CHRYSANTHEMUM SHOW 
AT NORRISTOWN 

The Chrysanthemum Show will take place in the 
Stewart Armory, Norristown, on Saturday and Sun- 
day, November 3-4 (Saturday 4:00-10:00 P.M.; Sunday 
12:00-5:00 P.M.). The show is held in cooperation 
with the Men's Chrysanthemum Club of Norristown 
and the Philadelphia Branch. National Association of 
Gardeners. Stewart Armory is on Harding Blvd., at 
tht edge of Elmwood Park in Norristown. Admission 
is free to members of the Society. 

Anyone wisliing a show schedule may obtain one 
by writing or telephoning the Society. 





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Register by using the clip-out coupon. Please enclose check and 
mail to 389 Suburban Station. Phila. .?. Registrations accepted in the 
order received: confirmation by return post card. 

GARDEN CLINIC REGISTRATION ^ 

Please accept my reservation for: 

D October 4, 11, 18. 25 TREES AND 
SHRUBS IN YOUR GARDEN 
($10.00 per member, series of four) 

D October 28 (Sunday, 10:00 A.M.) 
BONSAI - ADVANCED 
($10.00 per member) 

D October 28 (Sunday, 7:00 P.M.) 
BONSAI FOR BEGINNERS 
($20.00 per member, includes materials) 

D November 6, 13, 20 

INDOOR GARDENING 

($6.00 per member, series of three) 

Name — 

Address 

Telephone 



BUS TOUR RESERVATION 

Please accept my reservation for the following 

excursion (s) : 

D Saturday, October 20, 1%2 

THE NEW YORK BOTANICAL 

GARDEN 

(members $6.00; guests $8.00) 

□ Saturday, November 17, 1962 

HOLLY ORCHARD, N. J. SILICA 
SAND CO. KOSTER NURSERIES 
(members $2.50; guests $3.50) 

Name 

Street and No 



Post Office 

Telephone 

Clip and mail with check or money order to 
389 Suburban Station Bldg., Philadelphia 3, Pa. 



DATES To Mark On Your CALENDAR 

OCTOBER 2 MEMBERS' EVENING 7:30 P.M. 

389 Suburban Station Building 

OCTOBER 3 GARDEN CLINICS 

Woodstown, N. J. 
(advance registration necessary) 
OCTOBER 4, 11, 18, 25 GARDEN CLINIC 



TREES AND SHRUBS 



10:30 A.M. 



(advance registration necessary) 
OCTOBER 15 & 16 LANDSCAPE SCHOOL 

Strawbridge & Clothier Auditorium 

OCTOBER 20 BUS EXCURSION 8:30 A.M. 

NEW YORK BOTANJCAL GARDEN 

(advance registration necessary) 

See page 3 

OCTOBER 28 GARDEN CLINICS 

BONSAI - ADVANCED 10:00 A.M 

BONSAI FOR BEGINNERS 7:00 P.M 

(advance registration necessary) 

OCTOBER 29 LECTURE 8:00 P.M 

MR. YUJI YOSHIMURA 

Commercial Museum 

(tickets necessary - see page 3) 

NOVEMBER 3 & 4 CHRYSANTHEMUM SHOW 

Stewart Armory, Norristown 
NOVEMBER 6 MEMBERS' EVENING 7:30 P.M. 

389 Suluirhan Station Building 

NOVEMBER 14 ANNUAL MEETING 3:30 P.M. 

NOVEMBER 17 BUS EXCURSION 9:00 A.M. 

MILLVILLE - BRIDGETON, N. J. 

(Reservations necessary, see pg. 3) 

NOVEMBER 20 LECTURE: 8:00 P.M 

PROF. ROBERT S. REICH 

The Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia 



THE PENNSYLVANIA 



HORTICULTURAL 



SOCIE' 



1617 PENNSYLVANIA BOULEVARD 
PHILADELPHIA 3. PENNSYLVANIA 




VOL. 



No. 10 



NOVEMBER. 1962 






DISCOVER THE BIRDS 



Residents of the Greater Delaware Valley are 
fortunate to live on one of the most popular routes 
used by birds on the annual migrations northward 
and southward. As a result, a large number and many 
different kinds pause here for shelter and food, both 
in spring and in fall. In addition the Delaware Valley 
area is situated roughly at the half way place along 
the Atlantic seaboard ; consequently, some birds which 
go no further north in the summer and some which 
consider this far enough south to be a comfortable 
place in which to spend the winter become our regular 
summer and winter residents, respectively. Occasion- 
ally birds are driven inland from the ocean by high 
winds or storms. Some stray from the Mississippi 
flyway ; others com^e south when the food supply in 
the north is poor, and some, like the cattle egret 
whose original home was in Africa but now feeds near 
Cape May, New Jersey, appear for not altogether 
known reasons. 

The second great asset in the Delaware Valley is 
the variety of terrain within easy motoring distance 
of metropolitan areas. The Atlantic Ocean is the home 
of the salt water birds. The brackish waters of the 
inland passage way of New Jersey, the marshes of 
the Delaware Bay and river, and an abundance of 
cultivated fields attract quite different sorts. Fields 
and pastures, extensive woodlands, parks and gardens 
— in each of these places you will find different birds, 
depending upon the needs of each. On a one day trip 
from the Greater Philadelphia area you may see 
swallows, sparrows of several varieties, kingbirds, 
jays, cardinals, kingfishers, crows, vultures, shore 
birds, herons, geese, ducks, skimmers and, quite likely, 
sparrow hawks, marsh hawks and possibly ospreys 
and duck hawks. And all of these from an automobile ! 

AIDS TO IDENTIFICATION 

A detailed guide about where to find the birds 
which appeal to you is found in the very practical and 
useful book by Olin Sewall Pettingill, Jr. : A Guide 
to Bird Finding East of the Mississippi, (New York. 
Oxford University Press, 1951). The book is divided 
into chapters for each state and the recommended 



places for finding various birds are listed in alphabeti- 
cal order. Having arrived at a given site, you need a 
book for identifying the birds you see : Roger Tory 
Peterson's Guide to the Birds of the Eastern United 
States, (Houghton Mifflin Co., Boston, 1934). Mr. 
Peterson was the first ornithologist to help beginners 
identify birds by means of colored illustrations in 
which the salient marks of each kind are pointed out. 
Another helpful tool for becoming more knowledg- 
able about Delaware Valley birds is the Field List of 
the Delaware Valley Region, published Ijy the Dela- 
ware Valley Ornithological Club (available from the 
Society at twenty-five cents plus postage). This list 
gives detailed information about locating birds in the 
area. One of the newer aids, to be used at home, is 
A Field Guide to Bird Songs, recorded in the field bj' 
the Laboratory of Ornithology, Cornell University. 
(These long playing records are available from our 
library.) 

WHERE TO FIND THEM 

Bowman's Hill on the Delaware River (south of 
New Hope) is a good place to see many birds because 
of the variations in terrain. Nearby, at Washington's 
Crossing, birds are banded every Saturday and Sun- 
day and anyone may stop by to watch (3 ;00 P. M. 
each day in winter). The Delaware River affords fine 
birding, especially in the marshes which stretch along 
the west bank from Trenton to Cape May. Tinicum 
Marsh, within the city limits of Philadelphia (near 
the airport), is an excellent place to see a variety 
of birds (and plants) and is easy to get to. For hawks, 
ravens, eagles, and many other birds riding the wind 
currents on their migrations, Hawk Mountain (near 
Reading) is unique. 

Along the Atlantic seaboard there are many ex- 
ceptional places to observe birds. From Tom's River 
southward, every mile along the ocean front or along 
the bays of the inland passage and the marshes which 
border them may be rewarding. Tuckerton, Brigan- 
tine Wildlife Refuge, Stone Harbor and Cape May are 
favorites. Cape May is nationally known for the l)ir(ls 

(cont'd on page 2) 



DISCOVER THE BIRDS-(cont'd) 

which congregate there on migration before or after 
crossing the great expanse of water south of the Cape. 

AT HOME 

While it is a special treat to go away from home 
to see birds, it is also very pleasant to have birds come 
to you. Even city squares attract a variety of birds, 
but with a little planning it is possible to attract many 
to gardens large and small, no matter whether in city 
or country because the three needs are easy to fill : 
water, food, and shelter. You are most likely to at- 
tract birds with a dependable food and water supply. 
A garden which has a great variety of trees, shrubs 
and other plants increases the chances of attracting 
a wider variety of birds, since the needs differ accord- 
ing to species, and the plants provide both food and 
shelter. In The Book of Bird Life by Arthur A. Allen, 
(D. Van Nostrand Co., Inc., 1961,) Chapter 15, "At- 
tracting Birds" and in several other books in the 
Horticultural Society library are long lists of garden 
plants which can be used for this purpose. 

A well stocked feeding tray from September 
through June attracts both migrants and resident 
birds. It is essential that the food supply is constant, 
especially during the coldest months when other foods 
are scarce. Cracked corn and sunflower seeds are 
used at the very successful Laboratory of Ornithology 
at Cornell University. It is well to add suet and 
peanut butter in cold weather. Mixed bird feed appeals 
to smaller birds, but raisins, bits of bread and slices 
of apple, tomato and sections of orange may increase 
considerably the number and variety of birds at your 
feeder. Every snow storm provides the opportunity 
to watch for new birds, since they are more easily 
seen and they are more dependent on the seed and 
water you provide than on sunny, warm days. 

The garden which provides food, water and shel- 
ter, both winter and summer, is the one most likely 
to be well populated with a wide variety of birds — 
luckily, this is not difficult to do in the Delaware 
Valley. 



MR. PRESIDENT GOES TO AFRICA 

When the President of The Pennsylvania Horti- 
cultural Society goes travelling, he sees many things 
garden-wise (and some not so garden-wise) which 
make for interesting viewing. Mr. Henry Mirick took 
his family on safari in Africa for five weeks this past 
summer — and it is natural that he would take par- 
ticular note of the African landscape with its unusual 
trees and other wild plants. His zoological interest 
came to the forefront, too, so he also has brilliant 
slides of antelope . . . zebra. 

Brief reports of our year's achievements, election 
of Council members and refreshments, too — all at 
the Annual Meeting. Wednesday. November 14, 3:30 
P.M.. .^89 Suburban Station Building — won't you 
come ? 



ELECTIONS TO COUNCIL 

The Council of The Pennsylvania Horticultural 
Society, its governing body, is elected by the members 
of the Society each year at the Annual Meeting. 
Council members are elected for a three year period, 
ten each year, making a maximum number of thirty 
as provided for the by-laws. 

To be presented for election to the Council at 
the 1962 Annual Meeting, November 14, in the rooms 
of the Society, 389 Suburban Station Building, are: 

Term to expire 1963: Mrs. H, Cameron Morris 

Terms to expire 1964: Mrs. H. Rowland Timms 
Mrs. James C. Hornor Mr. Theodore Foulk, II 

Terms to expire 1%5 : Mrs. Henry W. Breyer, Jr. 
Mr. W. Atlee Burpee, Jr. Mr. Henry D. Mirick 
Mr. George R. Clark Mr. Richard Thomson 

Mrs. Franklin d'Olier Dr. J. Franklin Styer 

Mrs. Edward L. Elliot Mr. Carroll R. Wetzel 

While the Council can fill vacancies within its 
own body, these are valid only until the next Annual 
Meeting, when these names must be presented for 
election by the members; hence the names of Mmes. 
Morris, Timms, Hornor, d'Olier and of Mr. Foulk. Mrs. 
Morris and Mrs. d'Olier were elected to Council vacan- 
cies in September because of their positions as Chair- 
man and Vice Chairman of The Philadelphia Flower 
Show Committee, in accordance with action taken at 
the June meeting of the Council. Mrs. d'Olier will 
succeed Mrs. Morris as Show Chairman. 

The by-laws also provide that additional nomina- 
tions made be made in writing by fifteen or more 
members of the Society. 

Officers of the Society — President, two to four 
Vice Presidents, Secretary and Treasurer — are elected 
by the Council at the first meeting of the new year. The 
by-laws provide that no president may succeed him- 
self more than twice, so that an individual cannot hold 
that office for more than three successive years. 



I 



MEMBERS' EVENINGS 

Mrs. George E. DeCoursey of Paoli, who con- 
tributed the lead article for this month's NEWS, will 
discuss birds in the garden on Tuesday, November 
6th at 7:30 P.M. Members and guests interested in 
attracting not only more but a greater variety of birds 
to their gardens will have the opportunity to ask 
questions and share experiences with others in the 
group. 

The library will open at 6:30 for the convenience 
of members. 

On Tuesday, December 4th, Mrs. H. Cameron 
Morris, our Philadelphia Flower Show Chairman, will 
show slides which she took in Japan in the summer 
of 1961. 



NEW BOOKS TO BORROW 
i FROM THE LIBRARY 

Flowers: Creative designs, geometric analysis new ed. 

by M. Benz. San Jacinto, 1962. xvi, 288 pp. illus. 

part col. $15.00. 

A flower arrangement book for both professional 
and amateur which comprehensively covers floral 
design. The book is perhaps the standard text as it 
covers the following areas : floral art, arrangement, 
corsages, weddings, funeral work, and dressing of 
potted plants. 

Manual for floral decoration in the home vol. 1 by 
Seymour Carren. Orange Judd, 1962. xii, 144 pp. 
illus. $6.95. 

A work designed for home study and written from 
teaching experiences of the author. It includes theory 
of design, color and many types of flower arrange- 
ments. It is well illustrated with line drawings. 

Flowers of the Holy Land by Bertha Spafford Vester, 
biographical sketch by Lowell Thomas, note by 

P Norman Vincent Peale. Hallmark Cards, distrib. 
• by Doubleday, 1962. 64 pp. illus. $2.00. 

Seventeen watercolor paintings of wildflowers 
with brief notes by a courageous and energetic woman. 

Folklore and odyssesy of food and medicinal plants 

by Ernst and Johanna Lehner. Tudor, 1962. 128 

pp. illus. $4.59. 

Short stories of cereals, stimulants, odysseys of 
plants, the physic garden, and culinary herbs are ex- 
cerpted from early manuscripts and books. The 200 
reproductions from rare 15-17th century books are 
interesting but poorly printed. 

Great Smoky Mountains ; Wildflowers by C. C. Camp- 
bell and others. University of Tennessee, 1962. 
41 pp. col. illus. $1.00. 

This booklet is a must for anyone vacationing 
or driving through the Great Smokies. It is compiled 
by authorities and illustrated with 55 beautiful color 
photographs which allow for quick identification as 
well as being pretty to look at. 



CHRYSANTHEMUM SHOW 
AT NORRISTOWN 

The Chrysanthemum Show will take place in the 
Stewart Armory, Norristown, on Saturday and Sun- 
day November 3-4 (Saturday 4:00-10:00 P.M.; Sun- 
day 12:00-5 :00 P. M.) The show is held in cooperation 
with the Men's Chrysanthemum Club of Norristown 
and the Philadelphia Branch, National Association of 
Gardeners. Stewart Armory is on Harding Blvd., at 
the edge of Elmwood Park in Norristown. Admission 
is free to members of the Society. 

Anyone wishing a show schedule may obtain one 
by writing or telei)honing the Society. 



NEW LANSCAPES AND YOU: NOVEMBER 20 

As our urban areas grow, gardens, parks and 
other open, green spaces become more significant to 
the w^ell being of man. Many members of the Horti- 
cultural Society are involved not only in the land- 
scaping of their own properties but in the ever in- 
creasing activity in civic and community landscape 
problems, therefore the lecture committee is presenting 
Dr. Robert S. Reich of Louisiana State University 
at 8:00 P.M. on Tuesday, November 20 at the 
Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia. While 
Professor Reich is particularly interested in the broad 
aspects of the landscape, he is interested in small 
gardens of the suburban backyard variety, too ; they 
also are a part of maintaining a healthy environment 
for man. 

Before going to LSU in 1941, Dr. Reich was an 
instructor at Cornell University and at the University 
of Connecticut. He received both his B.S. and Ph.D. 
degrees from Cornell University, studied landscape 
architecture at the University of Southern California 
under Garret Eckbo, and has also taught at Shriven- 
ham American University in England and Biarrity 
American University in France. 

Admission to the lecture is free to members upon 
the presentation of their membership cards; $1.00 to 
guests and to the general public. (The Auditorium 
entrance to the Academy is on the 19th Street side 
of the building.) 



CHRISTMAS DECORATIONS 

A new twist has been given to Christmas decora- 
tions this year. Instead of the usual Christmas Show, 
the committee has decided to have a less formal ex- 
hibition of holiday decorations. The classes are only 
two: 

1. Holiday decoration for a table, mantle, desk, 
or any other horizontal surface. 

2. Holiday decoration to hang on a wall, door, 
or any other vertical surface. 

All decorations should contain at least some 
materials of plant origin. Pods, cones, etc. may be 
painted dried or otherwise treated, if the exhibitor so 
wishes and artificial materials — ornaments, fruits, 
paper, etc. — may be used with the natural materials. 

Any exhibitor may make as many entries as he 
or she wishes — please let us know by post card or 
telephone that you expect to enter so we can reserve 
a space for you. 

The Show will not be judged in the usual sense. 
Instead a qualified panel will award Special Distinc- 
tion seals to deserving decorations. 

Entries may be made any time Monday, December 
3 and must be picked up anytime Friday, December 
5. Show open to visitors Tuesday. 10 A.M. -7:30 P.M., 
Wednesday and Thursday 10 A.M. -5 P.M. 



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2:00 P.M. 



GARDEN CLINICS 

NOVEMBER 6, 13, 20 

INDOOR GARDENING 

Winter need not be gray — not if you learn to 
garden well indoors. Here is the opportunity to be- 
come better informed, have your gardening instinct 
aroused and to add stature to your winter-garden 
accomplishments through a series of three fact-filled 
sessions. Ernesta Drinker Ballard, Instructor. 
DECEMBER 8 10:00 A.M.; 1:30 P.M 

CHRISTMAS WREATH-MAKING 

Holiday decorations come and go but one type, 
the wreath, remains popular and in good taste year 
after year. Here's an opportunity to become adept 
at making a full, rich wreath for your front door — 
or for a friend's — and the only thing you need is 
your pruning shears! Bring those (and yourself) and 
we'll furnish all of the materials. Space is limited to 
twenty members for each session. (Morning session, 
Martha Ludes Garra, Instructor; Afternoon session, 
Mrs. Ballard.) Register early. 



Register by using the clip-out coupon. Please enclose check and 
mail to 389 Suburban Station. Phila. .?. Registrations accepted in the 
order received; confirmation by return post card. 



GARDEN CLINIC REGISTRATION 

Please accept my reservation for: 

n November 6, 13, 20 

INDOOR GARDENING 

($6.00 per member, series of three) 

a December 8 10:00 A.M. 

a December 8 1 :30 P.M. 

CHRISTMAS WREATH-MAKING 
($5.00 per member each session) 

Name _ 

Address _ - 

Telephone 



DATES To Mark On Your CALENDAR 

NOVEMBER 3 & 4 CHRYSANTHEMUM SHOW: NORRISTOWN 
NOVEMBER 6 MEMBERS' EVENING: BIRDS 7:30 P.M. 

NOVEMBER 6, 13, 20 GARDEN CLINIC: INDOOR GARDENING 



NOVEMBER 14 ANNUAL MEETING 
NOVEMBER 17 BUS EXCURSION 

HOLLY - KOSTER TOUR 
NOVEMBER 20 LECTURE: 

PROF. ROBERT S. REICH 
NOVEMBER 22 HAPPY THANKSGIVING ! 
DECEMBER 4 MEMBERS' EVENING: JAPAN 
DECEMBER 4, 5, 6 CHRISTMAS DECORATIONS 
DECEMBER 8 GARDEN CLINIC: WREATHS 



3:30 P.M. 
9:00 A.M. 

8:00 P.M 



7:30 P.M. 



HOLLY BUS TOUR 

Holly - Koster tour leaves Pennsylvania Blvd. en- 
trance. Suburban Station Bldg., Saturday, November 
17, 9:00 A.M. Return to Philadelphia, about 5:00 P.M. 
Transportation : $2.50 for members, $3.50 for guests 
(Family Memberships entitled to members' rate fare 
for each member of family.) 

(See last month's NEWS for defaih.) 

BUS TOUR RESERVATION I 

Please accept ray reservation: i 

□ Saturday, November 17, 1962 

HOLLY ORCHARD, N. J. SILICA I 

SAND CO. KOSTER NURSERIES , 

(members $2.50; guests $3.50) ' 

Name - I 

Street and No i 

Post Office - 

Telephone 

Clip and mail with check or money order to I 

389 Suburban Slation Bldg., Philadelphia 3, Pa. ' 



THE PENNSVLVAN 
HORTICULTURi 



SOCIET 



1617 PENNSYLVANIA BOULEVARD 
PHILADELPHIA 3. PENNSYLVANIA 




VOL. Ill No. II 



DECEMBER. 1962 



to MARC* 



CHRISTMAS TREE TEST PROVES IMPORTANCE OF WATER 



Significant results were obtained in a test which 
The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society conducted 
last December with the cooperation of the Taylor 
Arboretum, Chester, Pa. The test was designed to 
determine the extent to which cut evergreens, used 
indoors as Christmas trees, absorb water through the 
base of the trunk. The water content of the needles 
and twigs has a great deal to do not only with main- 
taining the attractiveness of the tree but is a crucial 
factor in determining fiammability. 

PROCEDURE 

Four cut Balsam firs were weighed. All stood at 
70° F. for ten days, one without water and three in 
water. One was put in cold water and another in hot 
water which cooled to room temperature. (Hot water 
was used because of tests at Cornell University in 
which it was shown that cut flowers absorbed more 
water and lasted longer if placed in warm — bath 
temperature — water and both the water and the plant 
tissues cooled together.) The fourth tree was placed 
in cold water containing a commercial preservative 
such as used with cut flowers. The water was con- 
tained in double polyethylene bags which were sealed 
to the trunks so that no water could be lost by evapo- 
ration to the air but could leave the bag only through 
the cut base of the tree. At the end of the test period 
the trees were weighed again to record their loss in 
water content. 



RESULTS 

The four Balsam firs lost the following proportions 
of their weights: dry tree 39.5%; tree in cold water 
21.7% ; tree in hot water 15.9% ; and tree in cold water- 
preservative combination 19.2%. The test proved 
conclusively that water was absorbed by the trees. 
Those in water retained a higher percentage of their 
original weights than did the dry tree. They also had 
a fresher appearance. 

In line with the Cornell findings with cut flowers, 
the tree placed in hot water at the beginning of the 
test lost less weight than the ones in cold water and 
in the cold water-preservative combination. 

Incidently, the dry tree and the one placed in 
hot water weighed nearly the same at the beginning 
of the test (23.7 and 23.5 pounds respectively). In 
actual pounds of water the losses were 9.4 and 3.7 
pounds respectively. It is interesting to note that even 
the tree which took up the greatest amount of water 
(lost the least weight) did not absorb as much water 
as it lost. 

None of the Balsam firs absorbed the entire 
quantity of water in the polyethylene bags. In the 
same test, but using Scots pines instead of Balsams, 
the Scots pines absorbed all of the water before the 
end of the ten day period so the results were not as 
accurate. However, the dry tree still lost more than 
twice as much weight (35.3%) as those in water 
(14.7% and 17.4%). 





CHRISTMAS TREE WATER ABSORPTION TEST DECEMBER 20-30, 1962 




BALSAM FIR 


WEIGHT 12/20/61 


WEIGHT 12/30/61 


WEIGHT LOSS 


% WEIGHT LOSS* 


dry (no water] 


23.65 lb. 


14.3 lb. 


9.35 lb. 


39.5% 


cold water 


20.81 lb. 


16.29 lb. 


4.52 lb. 


21.7% 


hot water 


23.49 lb. 


19.75 lb. 


3.74 lb. 


15.9% 


cold water with 
preservative 


15.45 lb. 


12.47 lb. 


2.98 lb. 


19.2% 



* Based on original weights in grams. 



CHRISTMAS DECORATIONS 

Don't forget to bring in your favorite Christmas 
decoration on Monday, December 3, for the three day 
display of Christmas decorations in the Horticultural 
Society rooms. See last month's NEWS for details 
of the show. There only will be two classes: one for 
hanging decorations such as wreaths, swags, and 
mobiles ; the other for arrangements for tables, desks 
and other horizontal surfaces. Without the conven- 
tional class limitations, this show should prove to be a 
lot of fun and bring out some imaginative ideas. 

Members and their guests may see the Christmas 
Show on Tuesday from 10:00 A.M. until 7:30 P.M. 
at which time the Member's Evening program begins. 
On Wednesday and Thursday the show will be open 
from 10:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. 



STAFF CHANGES 

Nancy Gail Urian of Wenonah, New Jersey joined 
the staff of the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society as 
Horticulturist on October 1, 1962. Miss Urian is a 
graduate of the Ambler Campus of Temple University 
and was formerly on the garden editorial staff of 
Sunset Magazine, a West Coast publication. She 
replaces the former Miss Mary O. Milton who became 
Mrs. Alfred S. Martin in May. 

Another marriage of a stafif member took place 
this summer when our librarian. Miss Ann Waterman, 
became Mrs. E. D. Rudolph. Dr. Rudolph is a lichen- 
oligist and is in the Antartic at the present time. In 
January Mrs. Rudolph flies to New Zealand where 
she and her husl^and hope to do some botanizing 
before returning to Columbus, Ohio where Dr. Ru- 
dolph teaches at The Ohio State University. 

Mr. John A. Miller, who is earning his Master's 
Degree in Library Science at Drexel Institute, will 
be taking over the library on a part time basis. He 
will be in the library to assist members on Mondays 
and Fridays from 12:30 to 2:30 and on Tuesday, 
Wednesday, and Thursday between 10:00 and 2:00. 



MEMBERS' EVENING 

The Gardens of Japan will be the subject of the 
Member's Evening on Tuesday, December 4th, at 7:30 
P.M. Mrs. H. Cameron Morris. Chairman of our 
Philadelphia Flower Show Committee and a member 
of the council, will show slides and discuss her trip 
to Japan with the Garden Club of America in the 
summer of 1961. 

All members are invited to hear Mrs. Morris, to 
see the Christmas Show and to stay for refreshments. 

In January, Mrs. John E. Johansen of Upper 
Darby, will show slides and talk about the wildflowers 
in the Delaware Valley. The library has several books 
on the subject and you are encouraged to use them. 
Our library opens at 6:30 for the convenience of 
members on Members' Evenings. 



NEW BOOKS TO BORROW 
FROM THE LIBRARY 

Rose growing simplified by John Milton. Hearthside, 

1962. 128 pp. col. & b&w pis. $3.50. 

Written primarily for the beginner with aid in 
bu}ing, planting and general care of roses. Mr. Milton 
has had many years of close association with roses at 
Conard-Pyle Co., West Grove, Penna. 

Ornamental shrubs of California by Leonid Enari. 

Ward Ritchie, 1962. 214 pp. illus. $5.95. 

Dr. Enari, of the Los Angeles State and County 
Arboretum, provides keys (using flowers and leaves) 
and descriptions for 277 ornamental shrubs of Cali- 
fornia. Interesting notes follow each description and 
when important, cultivar names are given for varia- 
tions. An excellent work for gardeners who want to 
know plants growing in the California area. 

Propagating, house plants for amateur and commercial 
use by Arno & Irene Nehrling. Hearthside, 1962. 
282 pp. illus. 16 pis. $4.95. 

Methods of year round propagation in the house, 
cold frame, green house and sun-heated pit, with de- 
tails on using new chemicals and fluorescent lights 
etc. Dictionary of indoor plants and sources of supply. 

A complete guide to flower arrangements by Victoria 
P. Fort. Viking, 1962. 224 pp. illus. Col. & b&w. 
$15.00. 

Written by a competent woman in the flower 
arrangement field. This book reviews the over-all 
subject and is a comprehensive guide for the beginner. 

Outdoor lighting for your home by Stanley Schuler. 

Van Nostrand, 1962. xv, 192 pp. illus. "$5.95. 

Modern ideas for the ever increasing use of arti- 
ficial light. Emphasis of the book is on Christmas 
lighting. A list of where to buy garden lighting 
fixtures is included. 

My garden grows by Aldren A. Watson. Viking, 1962. 
32 pp. col. illus. $2.50. (For ages 3-6) 
The story of a vegetable garden is charmingly 
described by a little girl. Barbara Lees, daughter of 
our Society's director writes: "I liked the book very 
much. At the end the girl and her sister are sitting by 
the fire looking at other kinds of seeds to plant next 
year." 

Persian gardens and garden pavilions by Donald N. 

Wilber. Tuttle, 1962. 239 pp. illus. in col. & b&w. 

$12.50. (Reviewed by Mrs. H. R. Timms) 

"An excellent reference book but not too practical 

for daily gardening in Delaware Valley. Handsome 

illustrations and much information pertinent to ancient 

formal and royal customs, literature, art and gardens. 

Most of the gardens are old and symbolical, with 

many pools, fountains and waterways ; some of these 

concepts can be incorporated into our modern houses. 

This book is for 'travelogue' reading." 

(cont'd on page 4) 



I 



GARDEN CLINICS 

Don't hesitate to call the office (LO 3-8352) at 
the last minute to register for a garden clinic if you 
have forgotten to do so. There is always the possi- 
bility that there is still an opening. 

There is still time to sign up for one of the 
Christmas wreath-making clinics. Why not take ad- 
vantage of this opportunity to learn how to make a 
professional wreath and to decorate with evergreens? 
Come prepared to work and bring a pair of sharpened 
pruning shears ; all other materials will be supplied. 
Two sessions are planned for Saturday, December 8th, 
and will be held in the greenhouse of the Morris 
Arboretum. The morning clinic is at 10:00 and the 
afternoon clinic starts at 1 :30. See last month's NEWS 
or call the Society at the above number for further 
details. 

On January 29th gardeners who want information 
on growing plants in pots, hanging baskets, tubs, 
boxes, and other containers will have the opportunity 
to attend a garden clinic, "Container Grown Plants". 
Ernesta Drinker Ballard, author of two books on 
the subject and proprietor of a small commercial 
greenhouse, will discuss her methods of confining 
plants successfully to containers. Each participant will 
be given a plant to shape, prune, and repot at the clinic 
and to take home afterwards. This clinic is designed 
for both home gardeners and commercial growers. 
It presents an opportunity to learn how to grow 
plants well in the unnatural conditions of sunporches, 
window sills and greenhouses and in the limited space 
of a terrace, patio, or window box. Fee, including plant 
and pot. $7.00. The clinic will be held in the Ballard's 
Barn, Thomas Road, Chestnut Hill and is limited to 
20 members. 

Register by using the clip-out coupon. Please enclose check and 
mail to .?89 Suburban Station. Phil a. .?. Registrations accepted in the 
order received; confirmation bv return post card. 




A SPECIAL CHRISTMAS GIFT 

Have you thought about 
giving membership in the 
Pennsylvania Horticultural 
Society to a favorite relative 
or special friend? For a 
beginning gardener, the gift 
will produce a wealth of 
benefits which can help him 
to become an informed gar- 
dener. If the recipient is 
already an informed garden- 
er, he will welcome the 
opportunity to become associated with America's old- 
est and one of its most important horticultural 
organizations. 

The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society consists 
of nearly 5,000 amateur and professional horticulturists 
and gardening enthusiasts. While most are residents 
of the Greater Delaware Valley, members reside in 
many states and several foreign countries. 

A variety of memberships are available. One that 
is particularly appreciated is the Family membership; 
it provides Flower Show, Garden Visit, and Lecture 
admissions for husband, wife and children residing in a 
single household. Since its inauguration two years ago, 
this membership has become increasingly popular. 

Contributing and Sustaining Memberships carry 
the same privileges as the Family Membership. 

Each of your gift memberships will arrive via a 
special gift card informing the recipient of your gift 
and bearing 3'our name. Get an early start on your 
Christmas shopping by clipping out and sending in 
the coupon below. 



n 

D 



GARDEN CLINIC REGISTRATION 

Please accept my reservation for: 
CHRISTMAS WREATH-MAKING 
($5.00 per member each session) 

December 8 10:00 A.M. 

December 8 1 :30 P.M. 



CONTAINER GROWN PLANTS 
($7.00 including materials) 

D January 29 2:00 P.M. 

Name „ _ 

Address 

Telephone „ 



CHRISTMAS LIST — I want to give memberships 
in the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society 

ANNUAL $8.00 FAMILY $14.00 

COnSuTINS $25.00 ^"^^*'^'^^ »^''-»° 

To: 

Type of Membership 

To: 

Type of Membership 

From: 

□ Check enclosed for amount of 

□ Please bill me later. 




999Z -ON im-83<i 

a I V d 

aevisod s n 



^PS^^^^^I 


VINVA1ASNN3d 'Z VIHd13aV1IH^J 

^K avvArinoa viNVAiASNNad m\ 1 


^^^^^^ 



LIBRARY-(cont'd) 

The study of trees made simple by Solveig P. Russell. 

Doubleday (Made Simple Books), 1962. 159 pp. 

illus. paper. $1.45. 

An elementary introduction to the study of trees; 
similar to The study of flowers made simple. 

The home owners' complete garden handbook by John 
Hayes Melady. Grosset & Dunlap, 1954. 745 pp. 
illus. $3.95. 

The book is divided into five sections : flowers, 
vegetables, lawns, fruit, and landscape. The author 
has been a garden writer for many years and his illus- 
trator-daughter has published her work in well-known 
garden books. 

OTHER NEW BOOKS LISTED 

The work of Sir Joseph Paxton 1803-1865 by George 
F. Chadwick. Architectural Press, 1961. 

Lady with green fingers ; the story of Jane Louden by 

Bea Howe. Country Life, 1961. 

Capability Brown rev. ed. by Dorothy Stroud. Country 
Life, 1957. 

Pesticide Handbook 14th ed. edited by Donald E. H. 
Frear. College Science Publisher, 1962. 

The genus Monadenium by Peter R. O. Bally. Benteli, 
1961. 

Sander's one-table list of orchid hybrids vols. 1 & 2 
comp. by David F. Sander and Mrs. W. J. Wre- 
ford. David Sander's Orchids, Ltd., 1961. 

After a hundred years. The Yearbook of Agriculture 
1962. Gift of Representative James A. Byrne. 

The Lily Yearbook of the North American Lily 
Society No. 15, 1962. Edited by George L. Slate 
and Richard W. Eighty. 



DATES To Mark On Your CALENDAR 



DECEMBER 4 MEMBERS' EVENING: JAPAN 
DECEMBER 4, 5, 6 CHRISTMAS DECORATIONS 
DECEMBER 8 GARDEN CLINIC: WREATHS 

JANUARY 8 MEMBERS' EVENING: WILDFLOWERS 

JANUARY 16 LECTURE: PLANT PESTS 

JANUARY 29 GARDEN CLINIC: 
PLANTS IN CONTAINERS 



7:30 P.M. 

10:00 A.M. 
1 :30 P.M. 

7:30 P.M. 

6:30 P.M. 

2:00 P.M. 



JANUARY LECTURE SCHEDULE 

Dr. Patricia Allinson, Plant Pathologist on the 
staff of the Morris Arboretum, and Lecturer in Botany, 
University of Pennsylvania, will speak on plant dis- 
eases and how to control them on Tuesday, January 
16, at 6:30 P.M. in the Auditorium of the Academy 
of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia. Additional details 
will be given in next month's NEWS. 



GIVE TWO CHRISTMAS GIFTS IN ONE I 

Give garden books for Christmas gifts. The Li- 
brary has a large selection from which to choose. An 
example of a lovely gift book is Park's The world of 
roses. The librarian will be very helpful in making 
suggestions on all gardening subjects. By ordering 
through our librarian (by phone or in person) the 
Society receives a discount which is added to the 
new book budget of the library. 



GIFTS TO THE LIBRARY 

Gifts to the library recently have been a collection 
of seed and nursery catalogues from Richard B. Chillas 
and American Orchid Society Bulletin 1953-1962 from 
Mrs. Arthur R. Cannon. It is encouraging to have 
support from friends of the Library. 



SOCIET' 



1617 PENNSYLVANIA BOULEVARD 
PHILADELPHIA 3. PENNSYLVANIA 




VOL IV No. I 



JANUARY, 1963 



news 



HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY LECTURE 

January 16, 1963 

6:30 P.M. 

389 Suburban Station Building 

MANY ARE THE WAYS OF 
PEST CONTROL 

DR. PATRICIA ALLISON 

Pathologist, The Morris Arboretum 
Lecturer in Botany, The University of Pennsylvania 

The need for a common sense approach to 
controlling plant diseases and insects has become 
even more obvious since the publication of the 
controversial Silent Spring. Dr. Allison will dis- 
cuss these problems in no-nonsense terms which 
recognize that gardeners can be both chemically 
careless and foolishly sentimental. 

The great variety of control methods will 
be discussed and time will be allowed for ques- 
tions from the audience. 



1963 FLOWER SHOW OFFERS 
VARIETY OF CLASSES FOR EXHIBITORS 

While the classes for competitive gardens have 
long since been filled by eight enthusiastic garden 
clubs (the two classes are Garden by the Sea and 
Garden in Containers), a wide variety of room, table, 
niche arrangement and horticultural classes remain 
to be filled before the deadlines for each. Arrange- 
ment class entries must be received, in writing, by 
February 18; horticultural entries by February 25. 

A change this year will be the staging of the 
room and table classes on Sunday to remain through- 
out the week. 

In brief, the classes are as follows (see your 
Philadelphia Flower Show Schedule for details) : 

ARRANGEMENTS: 

503 (all week) A Section of a Room Coordinated to a 
Piece of Sculpture 

504 (all week) A Colorful Table Inspired by One of the 
Mediterranean Countries 

505 (Sunday) Composition Interpreting Greek or Roman 
Mythology (cont'd on pg. 2, col. 2) 



GARDEN CLINICS BRING 
BASIC HORTICULTURE TO MEMBERS 

Basic, down to earth horticultural information 
provided with a maximum of personal attention at a 
minimum cost is the guiding philosophy of the Garden 
Clinics Committee. In the past year over 250 mem- 
bers of the Horticultural Society registered for twenty 
sessions, each of which was devoted to a specific sub- 
ject. In the early months of the New Year, the 
Committee, under the chairmanship of Mrs. J. J. 
Willaman of Plymouth Meeting, turns its attention 
to a variety of new subjects as well as repeating some 
of last year's subjects which were over-subscribed. 

"Container Grown Plants", by Ernesta Drinker 
Ballard, is the first clinic of 1963. Members will learn 
how to grow plants properly in containers and take 
home plants they have shaped, pruned and repotted. 
Fee, $7, including plant and pot. Jan. 29, 2:00 P.M., 
Ballard's Barn, Thomas Road and Northwestern Ave., 
Chestnut Hill. Limited to 20 members. 

February brings a repeat of the highly successful 
"Home Greenhouses", given by Mrs. Ballard last 
winter. Successful management of a greenhouse, 
whether a large commercial establishment or a small 
home lean-to, requires knowledge of the effects of 
light, temperature, humidity and other environmental 
conditions on plant growth. Both beginners and 
seasoned operators can profit from the series of two 
clinics, in which these and many other aspects of 
gardening under glass will be discussed and demon- 
strated. The first session will be held at the Horti- 
cultural Society and the second at Mrs. Ballard's 
greenhouses. Feb. 7 and 9, 2:00 P.M. Fee, $6 for 
the series, limit 25 members. 

"Planning the Herbaceous Border", an outstanding 
series, comes later in February. Martha Ludes Garra 
will explain the value of a plan, and the mechanics 
of making it, succession of bloom, the use of color 
and texture, and how the gardener can increase bloom 
by succession planting and interplanting. There will 
be three study sessions and a reward session in June. 
At the first, Mrs. Garra will discuss garden planning, 
using charts of her own herbaceous border to illustrate 

(cont'd on pg. 2, col. !} 



GARDEN CLINICS - (confd from pg. 1) 

her points. She will assign a problem to be worked 
out: a plan for a one-color spring and fall garden. At 
the second session these plans will be individually 
discussed and studied by Mrs. Garra and all the mem- 
bers. The assignment for the third session will then 
be given to correct plans already presented, and to 
develop a new plan for an all season border. At the 
third session the last border plans will be studied and 
suggestions made by Mrs. Garra and the class. 

As a bonus for working hard — and learning a 
great deal — Mrs. Garra invites the clinic members 
to visit her own garden — the one studied by charts 
at the first session — in June, date to be determined 
by the class. These sessions offer a wealth of infor- 
mation by a professional horticulturist who gardens 
as capably as she instructs. Limited to 10 members, 
to insure individual attention. Feb. 15, 22, and Mar. 1 
at the Horticultural Society, 10:00 A.M. $15 for the 
series. 

The Garden Clinics Committee has planned the 
following subjects for the near future : Micro-climate 
in the garden — how to create it and control it ; Opti- 
cal Illusion — how color, texture and size relationships 
can be used to advantage in garden design ; Gardening 
for cutting all year 'round; Chrysanthemums — bonsai 
and cascades ; Chrysanthemums — growing plants 
for show. 

Be sure to watch the NEWS for announcements 
of future clinics. If you have topics to suggest as 
clinic subjects, be sure to send them in to the 
Chairman. 

For registration coupon see page 4. 



PLANT FORCING INFORMATION AVAILABLE 

Particularly useful information on forcing trees 
and shrubs for flower shows has been published in 
the OHIO NURSERY NOTES (March 1961), which 
comes from Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. 
This information is based on a schedule reported by 
Arthur W. Landseadel of the Secor Landscape Com- 
pany, Toledo, and includes the following list of plants : 
birch, magnolia, rhododendron, willow, dogwood, for- 
sythia, Japanese red maple, wisteria, weeping cherry, 
flowering crab apple and some azaleas. 

This information is available to members in the 
Library of our Society. 



LILY GROUP TO MEET 

The Middle Atlantic Regional Lily group will 
meet at The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society on 
Saturday, January 19, 2:00 P.M. Members of the 
Society who are particularly interested in growing 
lilies are invited to attend this meeting. The program 
will include a panel discussion on lily problems and 
cultural information. 



1963 FLOWER SHOW - (confd from pg. 1) 

506 (Sunday) An Arrangement in an Import from a Medi- 
terranean Country 

507 (Sunday) "Ode to a Grecian Urn" 

508 (Monday) Arrangement of Carnations 

509 (Monday) Challenge Class 

510 (Monday) Design with Container and Background of 
Same Material 

511 (Tuesday) Composition with Stained Glass 

512 (Tuesday) Roses 

513 (Tuesday) Novice Class 

514 (Wednesday) Composition with a Figure as an Integral 
Part of the Design 

515 (Wednesday) An Arrangement of Flowering Branches 
and Other Flowers 

516 (Wednesday) Shibui 

517 (Thursday) Design in Variations of Grey and White 

518 (Thursday) Orchids 

519 (Thursday) Design in two Containers 

520 (Friday) Composition Interpreting a Theatrical Pro- 
duction 

521 (Friday) Design Inspired by Oriental Print 

522 (Friday) Arrangement Using a Shell or Shell-Shaped 
Container 

HORTICULTURAL CLASSES: 

600 (Sunday) Trumpet Narcissus, Golden Harvest or Un- 
surpassable 

601 (Sunday) Hyacinth, L'Innocence or Arentine Arendsen 

602 (Sunday) Small Bulbs (including corms, rhizomes, tu- 
bers), one variety 

603 (Sunday) Gloxinia, single florist type 

604 (Sunday) Window Sill Collection 

605 (Sunday) Bonsai, large plants over 15 inches 

606 (Sunday) Tulip, Apricot Yellow or General De Wet 

607 (Sunday) Rooted Cuttings, one or more varieties of 
hardy evergreen trees or shrubs 

608 (Sunday) Topiary Ivy 

609 (Wednesday) Large Cup Narcissus, Duke of Windsor 
or Fortune 

610 (Wednesday) Hyacinth, Flushing or Crown Princess 
Margaret 

611 (Wednesday) A Living Exhibit of Horticultural Merit 
or Interest 

612 (Wednesday) Rooted Cuttings, one kind, tender woody 
or herbaceous plant 

613 (Wednesday) Plant grown as a standard 

614 (Wednesday) Hanging Basket, foliage plants, 12 inches 
or less 

615 (Wednesday) Bonsai, medium sized 

616 (Wednesday) Begonia, any variety and/or type 

617 (Friday) Tazetta Narcissus, Cragford or Geranium 

618 (Friday) Hyacinth. Queen of the Blues, Perle Brilliant, 
or Bismarck 

619 (Friday) Plant(s) for Terrace Decoration 

620 (Friday) Hanging Basket 

621 (Friday) Woody Plants, propagated by methods other 
than cuttings 

622 (Friday) Bonsai, miniature plants 

623 (Friday) Garden in a container 

624 (Friday) Bromeliads, to be shown on their own mount- 
ings 



I 



NEW BOOKS 

. ... to borrow from the library. Some are for 
wintertime reading pleasure, some for preparing for 
the gardening year ahead. Come in and see our new 
browsing collection — it contains many useful and 
enjoyable volumes which you can borrow to brighten 
the winter months. 



Whose woods these are: The story of the national forests 

by Michael Frome. Doubledav, 1962. 360 pp. illus. col. 
pis. $5.95. 

A history and guide to the .\merican wilderness areas 
which we enjoy today due to our foresighted ancestors. Mr. 
Frome writes about our heritage in an enlivened manner. 

The illustrated book of garden pests and diseases ed. by T. H. 
■I Everett. Greystone Press, Hawthorn Books, 1962. 160 pp. 

I illus. $5.00. 

A reprint of the last section of the I^ew Illustrated Encyclo- 
pedia of Gardening (unabridged), 1960, which Mr. Everett also 
edited. While a very useful volume, we think the publisher 
should point out this fact. 



The camelia book by John Threlkeld. Van Nostrand, 1962, xiv, 
204 pp. illus. 9 col. pis. $7.75. 

From the first step of choosing a good plant through the 
details of culture — soil and fertilizers, planting, watering, 
pruning, disease, grafting and hybridizing, the aspects of grow- 
ing camellias are carefully explained and helpfully illustrated. 
The author acknowledges assistance from qualified experts 
all over the world in preparing this fascinating history of an 
oriental plant that now thrives in occidental gardens. 

Camellias can be grown indoors in containers or outdoors, 
either in tubs or in the ground. For the gardener who wishes 
to use them in the landscape, suitable varieties are suggested 
for various purposes and sites. Lists of companion plants are 
also offered. There are useful chapters on corsages, arrange- 
ments and wreaths; and a helpful monthly guide. Selected 
lists of good varieties in each species and of important hybrids, 
names of camellia clubs, and similar helpful information com- 
plete the comprehensive, up-to-date book. 

Mr. Threlkeld was for ten years Superintendent of the 
Descanso Gardens, La Canada, California. 



You can grow camellias by Mary Noble and Blanche Graham. 
Harper & Row, 1962. xiv, 2S7 pp. illus. 4 col. pis. $7.50. 

An authoritative, reasonably complete account of the 
history, culture, use and variety of camellias (including major 
and minor species,, interspecific hybrids, selection problems 
and future of this genus). The final section is devoted to a 
list of cultivars, an annotated glossary of camellia terms and 
a complete index to the book and to cultivars and hybrids. 
The style is interesting, easy to read and understand, and the 
colored and black and white illustrations are helpful. 



Hew to know the ferns 2nd ed. by Frances Theodora Parsons. 
Dover, 1961. xiv, 215 pp. illus. $1.25 paperbound. 

Reprint of the 1899 printing. This inexpensive edition 
is very good for beginning students of ferns in the north- 
eastern U. S. The names need to be brought up to date by 
comparing them with modern floras; the line drawings would 
help in this matter. 



Manual of aquarium plants by Shirley Aquatics Ltd. House 
of Henshaw (distrib.) 1960. 64 pp. illus. softbound. $2.00. 

A professional and scientific guide to recognition and 
cultivation of oceanic and freshwater flora. Latin names and 



common habits are identified. Black and white illustrations 
leave much to be desired. No index or bibliography included 
but entries are alphabetically arranged by genus and species 
names. A favorable feature is the invaluable inclusion of the 
recognized discoverer (or authority) of each plant. Dr. George 
Taylor, Director of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, assisted 
in the preparation of this work. 

Best of show in flower arrangements Book 2, comp. by Mar- 
garet Harold. Allied, 1962. 40 pp. col. illus. and ports, 
folio. $1.95. 

Although not as informative in certain areas as one might 
desire, this second book of Miss Harold's presents many beauti- 
ful and effective colored photographs that enhance considerably 
the often indifferent descriptions. A number of women have 
contributed ideas and their pictures and brief biographies are 
included. 



A treasury of driftwood and dried arrangements by Tatsuo 
Ishimoto. Crown, 1962. 125 pp. illus. $2.95. 

By the author of The Art of Flower Arrangement and The 
Art of the Japanese Garden. He is famous as designer, teacher 
and photographer. Using weathered wood, stone, and dried 
plant materials, he has provided 100 new arrangements show- 
ing how both traditional and contemporary principles can 
be applied. 

Dried arrangements are independent of season, and in them 
the emphasis is less on color than on line and texture of 
natural materials. Students learn how to collect and arrange 
driftwood and other materials to best effect. Superb photo- 
graphs. 

Contemporary flower arrangement revised by Rae L. Goldson. 
Hearthside, 1962. 127 pp. illus. 4 col. pis. inc. supplement 
Workbook of containers, stands and mechanics. 32 pp. 
illus. $4.95. 

Acclaimed everywhere by reviewers, flower arrangers and 
honiemakers, this book has been completely revised and en- 
larged (with 41 new pictures, including 5 color plates) and is 
abundant with ideas for using flowers, fruits and foliage in 
fresh and original ways. 

Topics included are (1) design — space, composition, form 
balance, scale and proportion; (2) color and texture for mod- 
erns; (3) modern arrangement depends on good mechanics 
(delicate, ethereal compositions depend on solid construction) ; 
(4) story and mood in modern arrangements; (5) where to 
find contemporary plant materials; (6) new techniques and 
use of dried materials; (7) modern arrangements for table 
setting; (8) the contemporary arranger at the flower show 
and (9) a workbook of containers, stands and mechanics show 
how to individualize homes at small cost. Tips are given to 
beginners and advanced arrangers. 



MEMBERS' EVENINGS 

Mrs. John E. Johansen of Upper Darby will show 
slides of wild flowers — "From Cape May to the 
Poconos" at the Members' Evening program, Tuesday, 
January 8, 7:30 P.M. Mrs. Johansen is an enthusiastic 
gardener and her particular interest in native plants 
is responsible for her exploration of the Delaware 
Valley and the mountains of eastern Pennsylvania. 

The library will open at 6:30 for the convenience 
of members. 

On Tuesday, February 5, Mrs. Edward J. Garra, 
one of our Garden Clinics Instructors, will show slides 
of gardens in England and the chateau country of 
France which she visited in April and May of 1962. 



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Won't you recommend a prospective member? 

The Membership Committee is certain that all of 
our members must know at least two or three horticul- 
turally minded people who are not but should be 
members of The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society. 
If so, send in their names, by post card or telephone 
(LO 3-8352) and we will be happy to send a member- 
ship invitation in your name. 

Register by using the clip-out coupon. Please enclose check and 
mail to 389 Suburban Station. Phila. 3. Registrations accepted in the 
order received; confirmation by return post card. 



GARDEN CLINIC REGISTRATION 

Please accept my reservation for: 

n CONTAINER GROWN PLANTS 
($7.00 including materials) 
January 29 2:00 P.M. 

D HOME GREENHOUSES 
($6.00 for the series) 
February 7, 9 2:00 P.M. 

n PLANNING HERBACEOUS BORDER 
($15.00 for the series) 
February 15, 22, March I 10:00 A.M. 



Name 

Address 

Telephone 



DATES To Mark On Your CALENDAR 

JANUARY 8 MEMBERS' EVENING: WILD FLOWERS 7 :30 P.M. 

389 Suburban Station Building 

JANUARY 16 LECTURE: 6:30 P.M. 

MANY ARE THE WAYS OF PEST CONTROL 

389 Suburban Station Building 

JANUARY 29 GARDEN CLINIC: 2:00 P.M. 

CONTAINER GROWN PLANTS 

Chestnut Hill 

FEBRUARY 5 MEMBERS' EVENING 7:30 P.M. 

GARDENS OF FRANCE AND ENGLAND 

389 Suburban Station Building 

FEBRUARY 7, 9 GARDEN CLINIC: 

HOME GREENHOUSES 

389 Suburban Station Bldg. - Chestnut Hill 

FEBRUARY 12 LECTURE: 2:15 P.M. 

FLOWER ARRANGING 

Academy of Natural Sciences 

FEBRUARY 15, 22, MARCH 1 GARDEN CLINIC: 

PLANNING THE HERBACEOUS BORDER 

389 Suburban Station Building 

FEBRUARY 18 
Lost day for Arrangement Entries, Philo. Flower Show 

FEBRUARY 25 
Last day for Horticulturol Entries, Phila. Flower Show 

MARCH 10-16 

PHILADELPHIA FLOWER SHOW 

Trade & Convention Center 



THE PENNSVLVANI. 
HORTICULTURE 



SOCIETY 



1617 PENNSYLVANIA BOULEVARD 
PHILADELPHIA 3. PENNSYLVANIA 




no MARt* ' 



VOL. IV No. 2 



FEBRUARY. 1963 



^ 



WHERE TO SEE LANDSCAPE PLANTS IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 



For new home owners, first time landscapers and 
novice gardners, the vast horticultural resources of 
the greater Philadelphia area provide the opportunity 
to see ornamental trees, shrubs and herbaceous plants 
at their best. Time spent studying these plants, some 
at any time of the year, is well invested. Even the 
informed gardener can find new and interesting 
challenges. 

Below is a directory of botanic gardens, arbore- 
tums and similar establishments which are easily 
accessible to members of the Society, and in which 
labeled plants can be seen. While, in most instances, 
individuals or very small groups may wander at will, 
it is suggested that garden clubs and similar organiza- 
tions telephone or write ahead to make arrangements 
for a tour. 

AMBLER CAMPUS OF TEMPLE UNIVERSITY 
(formerly The Pennsylvania School of Horticul- 
ture for Women, "Ambler School") Ambler, Penn- 
sylvania; Jonathan W. French, Director; estab- 



HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY LECTURE 

February 12, 1963 
2:15 P.M. 

Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia 

DESIGN IN 
FLOWER ARRANGEMENT 

ELIZABETH RHOADS REYNOLDS 

A noted designer, Mrs. Reynolds has served 
as a judge, teacher and lecturer on her subject 
for over twenty years. Her approach to this 
subject deals with the fundamentals of design 
which apply to flower arranging as to all art 
forms. 

Free to members of the Society ; guest 
tickets (in advance at our office or at the door) 
$1.00. Please use 19th St. entrance to the 
Academy. 



h 



lished 1910; 186 acres (campus), about 10 in 
gardens and orchards. 

Of special note: collection of woody and herba- 
ceous ornamentals ; gardens. 

THE ARTHUR HOYT SCOTT 
HORTICULTURAL FOUNDATION OF 
SWARTHMORE COLLEGE 

established 1929; Swarthmore, Pa. 

Dr. John C. Wister, Director. 

200 acres (Swarthmore College campus) 

Of special note: magnolias, flowering cherries and 
crab apples, lilacs, hawthorns, Dexter hybrid rhodo- 
dendrons, daffodils, tree peonies. 

BARTRAM'S GARDENS 

54th and Elmwood Ave. (on Schuylkill River), 

Philadelphia, Pa., 22 acres ; 

Joseph B. Townsend, President; 

The John Bartram Association. 

America's first botanic garden, established by 
John Bartram (1699-1777), Botanist by Appointment 
to George III. Bartram and his son, William, were 
responsible for the collection and introduction to 
Europe of many eastern American plants. 

Of special note: Bartram's house, barn and memo- 
rabilia; Halesia, pawpaw, old yellow-wood (possibly 
only remaining original specimen). 

BOWMAN'S HILL WILDFLOWER PRESERVE 

Washington Crossing State Park, 

Washington Crossing, Pa., established 1934; 

Norman C. Fisher, Superintendant ; 100 acres. 

Purpose : to gather together native Pennsylvania 
plants. 

Of special note: 1,000 species, labeled, along 12 
marked trails, sphagnum bogs. 

ELLIS SCHOOL ARBORETUM 

established 1932; 

Newtown Square, Pa., 155 acres; 

S. Mendelson Meehan, Director. 

Of special note: a wide variety of woody orna- 
mentals in attractive plantings. 

Open to the public by permission (at office or by 
writing in advance). 

(cont'd on page 2, col. I) 



LANDSCAPE PLANTS-(Cont'd) 

JOHN J. TYLER ARBORETUM 

Lima, Pa., incorporated 1945 ; 

647 acres, mostly woodland ; 

Dr. John C. Wister, Director. 

Historic land deeded by Wm. Penn to Thomas 
Minshall and then passing to the Painter brothers 
who began planting exotic trees in 1840. 

Of special note: Century old specimens of Sequoia 
gigantea, Cedrus libani, Picea orientalis, and Other trees ; 
garden for the blind; "Pink Hill" — a serpentine barren 
covered with moss phlox in May. 
LONGWOOD GARDENS 

Kennett Square, Pa., founded 1921 ; 

Dr. Russell J. Seibert, Director; 

1,000 acres, 3J/2 acres under glass. 

Formerly the private gardens of Pierre S. duPont, 
now operated by the Longwood Foundation. 

Of special note: conservatory displays (all year), 
extensive formal gardens, rock garden; water lilies 
and many special plant collections. 
THE MORRIS ARBORETUM OF THE 
UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 

Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Dr. John M. Fogg, Jr., Director; 

165 acres, plantings started 1887, given to the 

University 1932. 

Of special note: mature specimens of temperate 
tree species, evergreens, oaks, hollies, drug plants, 
fernery, rose garden. 
SWISS PINES PARK 

Charlestown Rd., Valley Forge, Pa.; 

established 1959; 

Hans Daniels, Manager; 

20 acres devoted to arboretum, native plants. 

Of special note: Japanese garden, garden of native 
ferns, hawk watching, bird feeding. 
TAYLOR MEMORIAL ARBORETUM 

Ridley Rd., Chester, Pa.; 

established 1951 ; 28 acres ; 

Gerald K. Laulis, Superintendent; 

Of special note: heathers and heaths, small shrubs 
and many plant species suitable for suburban land- 
scaping. 
WESTTOWN SCHOOL ARBORETUM 

Westtown, Pa., established 1896; 

50 acres (campus) 

Stevenson Fletcher, Curator. 

Of special note: 400 species of trees, 175 conifers, 
mature specimens. 
WINTERTHUR 

Winterthur, Del. 

C. Gordon Tyrrell, Dir. of Gardens and Grounds. 

The Henry Francis duPont Winterthur Museum 
and Gardens. 

Of special note: azaleas, rhododendrons, spring 
flowering plants. Gardens open to the public April- 
June. 



MEMBERS' EVENINGS 

Mrs. Edward J. Garra of Ambler, one of the 
Horticultural Society's Garden Clinics Instructors, 
will show slides of gardens in England, Scotland, 
Wales and France, including several which are not 
usually open to European travellers, on Tuesday, 
February 5, 7:30 P.M. Mrs. Garra toured these 
gardens in April and May of 1962 and with a keen 
professional eye, caught many of the treasures they 
oiTer. Because of the informal character of the 
program, members will be able to ask questions. 

The library will be open at 6:30 for the 
convenience of members. 

On Tuesday, March 5, Carlton B. Lees, Director 
of the Society, will discuss remedies for front yards. 
Members are welcome to bring in plans and/or snap- 
shots of their front yards for blackboard analysis and 
discussion. 




An enthusiastic member of the Horticultural 
Society who is also a wholesale distributor of garden 
supplies in Greater Philadelphia reports on the in- 
credible growth of the feeding of wild birds in these 
straight-forward, hard facts : little more than a decade 
ago he sold between two and three tons of wild bird 
seed in a year; today he distributes, annually, 150 tons\ 



FROM ANOTHER SPRING 

"... I observed for the first time . . . that the 
worms which had done much mischief in several parts 
of our Province, by destroying the grass and even 
corn for two summers, had done the same thing here, 
and had eaten oflf the blades of their maize and long 
white grass, so that the stems of both stood naked 
four foot high. I saw some of the naked dark-colored 
grubs half an inch long; tho' most of them were 
gone, yet I could perceive they were the same that 
had visited us two months before. They clear all the 
grass in their way in any meadow they get into, and 
seem to be periodical as the locusts and caterpillars, 
the latter of which I am afraid will do us great 
mischief next summer . . ." 

John Bartram, July 16, 1743, on his journey from 
Philadelphia to Oswego, New York. 



NEW FLOWER SHOW AWARD 

The Men's Garden Club of Delaware Valley has 
made available the Medal of the Men's Garden Clubs 
of America to be presented to the garden in the Phila- 
delphia Flower Show most appropriately displaying 
the use of plants best suited for the Delaware Valley 
area. 



t 



NEW BOOKS IN OUR LIBRARY 

New or old, the books in The Pennsylvania Horti- 
cultural Society library can help you to become a 
better informed gardener. Some of the new titles: 

Garden to order; the story of Mr. Burpee's seeds and how they 
grow. New York, Doubleday, 1963. xii, 324 pp., illus $4.95. 
If your childhood visions of holiday sugar plums were 
eclipsed by the even more glorious visions inspired by the 
Burpee seed catalog when it arrived early in the new year. 
you must read this highly entertaining account of Mr. Burpee^s 
Seeds and how they grew. The story of one of the world's 
best known seed houses is highly informative, too, for it tells 
much of the search, selection and development of most of the 
familiar favorites from the house of Burpee: Golden Bantam 
corn, Fordhook beans. Crown of Gold marigolds, a host of 
zinnias, Gloriosa Daisies and many others. In addition there's 
■much good gardening information and such predictions for the 
years to come as: "zipper podded" lima beans, seedless cucum- 
bers, "cry-less" onions and jack-o-lantern pumpkins which 
grow on neat bushes rather than unruly, octopus-like vines. 
And the flowers predicted . . . pure visions of sugarplums! 

Diseases of Turfgrass by Dr. Houston B. Couch. First in a 
new series on Agricultural Science. Reinhold, 1962. 289 pp., 
illus., 14 in color. 

An excellent and up-to-date treatment of all phases of 
turfgrass diseases due to viruses, bacteria, fungi, and nematodes. 
Probably contains more precise information on the subject than 
any other single volume. Names the chemicals recommended 
for the control of the various diseases. Contains five conven- 
ient tables with cross references which show, for instance, that 
Kentucky Bluegrass is susceptible to 42 diseases and that rust 
attacks 17 different grasses. Should be invaluable to those 
responsible for the maintenance of fine turf. 

Dr. Walter S. Lapp, Lansdale, Pa. 

New techniques with dried flowers by Sarah Whitlock and 
Martha Rankin, illus. by Catherine Bishop and Edwin 
Roseberry. Hearthside, 1962. 32 pp. illus. 4 col. pis on 
endpapers. $2.50. 

A practical working guide to preserving plant material, it 
contains clear information about dehydration, glycerinizing and 
pressing plant material. Useful tips on making fresh materials 
last longer, on reviving wilted blossoms, on making 18th cen- 
tury bouquets as well as modern designs are presented in an 
orderly arrangement so that a given subject may be found 
immediately. (13 plates in full color and 12 working drawings) 

Palms by Desmond Muirhead. Dale S. King, 1961. 140 pp. 

illus. $3.20 ($1.95 paperbound) 

Small in size but large in outlook is this book about palms 
and palm like plants which is enough to make a northerner want 
to move southward. Excellent photographs and sketches not 
only aid in identifying palms but in appreciating their landscape 
potential. Good reading for travellers to palm country, an 
ever handy layman's reference for anyone who spends much 
time there. 

Meet flora Mexicana; an easy way to recognize some of the 

more frequently met plants of Mexico as seen from the 

main highways by M. Walter Pesman. Dale S. King, 1962. 

280 pp. illus. col. fold. map. $6.00 ($4.00 paperbound) 

We can't think of a more practical approach (indicated 

in the title) to lure travelling plant lovers into the flora of a 

strange land. Mr. Pesman is a landscape architect, but he 

sought out the assistance of Mexican and American botanists 

in the preparation of his work. 

The plants are grouped (again with practicality) according 
to where they occur (desert, mesquite-grassland. pine-oak, 
forest, rain forest, etc.) and an excellent map color keys these 
various areas to all Mexico. 

For any garden-botanist-horticulturist travelling to Mexico, 
to go without a copy of this book would be to miss a great deal. 

The ageless relics; the story of Sequoia by Norman Taylor. 

St. Martin's Press, 1962. 115 pp., illus. $3.95. 

Norman Taylor is well known to readers of garden books 
especially for his Encyclopedia of Gardening. Now Mr. Taylor 
has come up with a very readable book on one of the natural 
wonders of America. Not only does he deal with these trees 



I 



GARDEN CLINICS OFFER VALUABLE 
ASSISTANCE IN FEBRUARY AND MARCH 

Alert gardeners realize the value of early planning 
prior to spring planting. An efficient and practical 
spray program, which is one of the first jobs to catch 
us unawares, will be the subject of a March clinic 
conducted by Martha Ludes Garra. Among the topics 
covered, Mrs. Garra will discuss not only sprays as 
controls for harmful insects and diseases, but she will 
also show how foliar feeding can promote and curtail 
plant groth. Charts on timing, dilution tables, and 
various methods of spraying will be discussed. Prob- 
lems confronting individuals will be given attention, 
too — perhaps you had lacebugs in the rhododendrons 
or the tips of your last year's crop of asparagus curled 
earthward. You will not be able to take all this infor- 
mation home in your head, probably, so please bring 
a notebook. The clinic will be held on March 18th 
at 8 o'clock in the evening in the Society rooms, 389 
Suburban Station Building. Registration is $2.00 per 
member. 

Two other clinics, previously noted in the January 
NEWS, are also of timely interest. Greenhouse gar- 
dening, given by Ernesta Drinker Ballard for those 
with home greenhouses or an interest in having their 
own one day, will be held in the Society rooms on Feb- 
ruary 7 at 7:30 in the evening, followed by an on the 
spot lecture at Mrs. Ballard's greenhouse, Thomas 
Road and Northwestern Avenue, Chestnut Hill on 
February 9 at 1 :30 in the afternoon. Fee for the series 
is $5.00 and is limited to 24 members. 

The other garden clinic. Planning the Herbaceous 
Border, is a series of three meetings designed to teach 
each participant how to plan a perennial garden to 
fit his own property. Martha Ludes Garra, professional 
garden consultant, will guide you in drafting your own 
plan and give expert advice on selection of plants. This 
is a thoroughly enjoyable course and has a bonus 
session to be held out at Mrs. Garra's home where you 
can see her own garden in bloom. The class series 
scheduled for February 15, 22, and March 1 has been 
filled ; however another series will be given on Feb- 
ruary 18, 25 and March 4 at 1 :00 P. M. if registration 
warrants. Registration is $15 per member and is 
limited to 10 persons. 



as trees, but how man has been involved with them — and 
some very important persons some of them were: P. T. 
Barnum, Horace Greeley, Prince .A.lbert, Queen Victoria, Sir 
Joseph Paxton and the Duke of Wellington. 

Good reading. 

Gardens by Miles Hadfield. Putnam's, 1962. 128 pp. illus. Col. 

and b.&w. $3.95. 

An outstanding book on gardens of Italy, France, the 
Gothic North, China, Japan, England, and 19th century green- 
house and Alpine gardens when one considers the price. Too 
often photographs of this quality and magnitude are reserved 
for more expensive works. Good to look at over and over 
again, and it also reads well. 



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MARCH 10-16 

PHILADELPHIA FLOWER SHOW 

Trade and Convention Center 

March 10 1:00-7:00 P.M. 

MEMBERS' PREVIEW 12:00 



March 11-16 



10:00 A.M. -10:00 P.M. 



Register by using the clip-out coupon. Please enclose check and 
mail to 389 Suburban Station, Phila. 3. Registrations accepted in the 
order received; confirmation by return post card. 
1 

GARDEN CLINIC REGISTRATION ' 

Please accept my reservation for: 



n HOME GREENHOUSES 
($6.00 for the series) 
February 7, 9 



2:00 P.M. 



D PLANNING HERBACEOUS BORDER 
($15.00 for the series) 
February 18, 25, March 4 1 :00 P.M. 



n SPRAY PROGRAMS 
($2.00) 
March 18 



8:00 P.M. 



Name 

Address _... 
Telephone 



DATES To Mark On Your CALENDAR 

FEBRUARY 5 MEMBERS' EVENING 7:30 P.M. 

GARDENS OF FRANCE AND ENGLAND 

389 Suburban Station Building 

FEBRUARY 7, 9 GARDEN CLINIC: 

HOME GREENHOUSES 

389 Suburban Station Bldg. & Chestnut Hill 

FEBRUARY 12 LECTURE: 2:15 P.M. 

FLOWER ARRANGING 

Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia 

FEBRUARY 15, 22, MARCH 1 GARDEN CLINIC: 

PLANNING THE HERBACEOUS BORDER 

389 Suburban Station Building 

FEBRUARY 18 
Last day for Arrangement Entries, Philo. Flower Show 

FEBRUARY 25 
Last day for Horticultural Entries, Phila. Flower Show 

MARCH 5 MEMBERS' EVENING 7:30 P.M. 

REMEDIES FOR FRONT YARDS 

389 Suburban Station Building 

MARCH 12 SPRING LUNCHEON 

Bellevue-Stratford Hotel 

MARCH 18 GARDEN CLINIC: 

SPRAY PROGRAMS 

389 Suburban Station Building 



HORTICULTURAL 
SOCIE 



1617 PENNSYLVANIA BOULEVARD 
PHILADELPHIA 3. PENNSYLVANIA 



5»? 




VOL. IV No. 3 



MARCH. 1963 



NEW HEADQUARTERS AND GARDENS FOR HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 



I 



After several years of planning and long years 
of wishing for something more horticultural in spirit 
and outlook than our present Suburban Station offices, 
the Council of The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society 
is delighted to announce that new headquarters and 
gardens will become a reality in Spring, 1964. Created 
for us by the Independence National Historical Park, 
the Society will occupy the facilities, along with the 
Philadelphia Society for Promoting Agriculture, in 
exchange for maintaining a garden and for certain 
other considerations. 

The bright, new headquarters will be designed, 
within, to meet the physical and program needs of 
our Society while the exteriors of the buildings retain 
their 18th Century facades. Located on Walnut Street, 
between Third and Fourth Streets, they not only 
become a part of the extensive and attractive Histori- 
cal Park, but are near Society Hill and other historic 
areas which are enjoying a spectacular rebirth. Acces- 
sible via the 10c "loop" bus from Suburban Station 
Building, and close by the soon to be built Delaware 
Expressway, the new headquarters will be easy to 
reach via both public and private transportation. The 
Historical Park is planning, too, for adequate parking 
facilities. 

As the first floor of the building has been de- 
signed, members enter an elevator and reception space 
which opens immediately into an attractive Exhibition 
Room. Adjacent to this room is an Assembly Room 
with seating capacity of approximately one hundred. 
For large exhibitions and shows, the two rooms can 
be used together. 

Downstairs, at the basement level, plans include 
a 20 X 30 foot classroom-laboratory for Garden Clinics 
and other workshop type classes. A cold storage room 
and access to the garden are provided at the rear of 
this room. A small mailing room and a combination 
kitchen and flower arranging room complete the facili- 
ties at this level. Groups meeting in the new head- 
quarters will be able to prepare light refreshments 
and transport them via the elevator. Storage spaces 
for flower arranging equipment and deep sinks for 
the convenience of arrangers also are called for in 
the plans. 

Taking the self service elevator to the second 
floor, members step out into a small foyer with ofifice 



spaces opening ofif of it. Across the foyer a flight of 
six or eight steps leads to the library level which 
occupies the second and third floors of the eastern- 
most of the three buildings (above the Assembly 
Room). 

The library as planned, is unique because of its 
two-stories-high ceiling, the second level being only 
a narrow balcony on the east, south and west walls, 
widening into a deck over the rare book room. Access 
to the balcony stacks will be via a spiral staircase, 
and four large windows on the south wall (two at 
each level) will allow winter sunshine to flood the 
room with light. 

The main floor of the library is to be devoted 
to the current (browsing) collection, references, card 
catalog and other items in everyday use, leaving the 
balcony for books less often used. 

The windows of the rare book room provide a 
view of the garden at the rear and of Carpenters' Hall. 
In this room are to be housed the rare books and 
manuscripts belonging to the Philadelphia Society for 
Promoting Agriculture as well as those belonging "to 
the Horticultural Society. 

On the third floor (over the office spaces) are the 
Members' Room, Council and Committee Room and 
quarters for the Society for Promoting Agriculture. 

Two small garden spaces are planned for, directly 
behind the buildings. One, accessible from the Assem- 
bly Room, is to be paved so that it can be used for 
outdoor activities. The other space will be devoted to 
plots for cut flowers and limited demonstrations. A 
lean-to greenhouse, each of its two sections approxi- 
mately 9 X 12 feet in size, is planned for the rear of 
the garden. An adjacent, historic out-building will 
serve as a potting room. Of adequate size for demon- 
strating how best to use a small home greenhouse, 
the two sections allow for two diiiferent temperature 
levels. 

To the west of the headquarters buildings and 
gardens wall be an 18th Century garden approxi- 
mately 90 feet by 110 feet in size. It is to be estab- 
lished by the Independence National Historical Park, 
maintained by the Horticultural Society and will be 
open to the public during appropriate hours. A walk- 
way through this garden will link two historic build- 

(cont'd on page 3) 



GARDEN CLINICS 

Although snow may be deep and temperatures 
below freezing, the Clinics Committee has made prep- 
aration for Spring. The first insects arrive along with 
the first green leaves, so the use of sprays for control- 
ling harmful insects and diseases, for foliar feeding 
and for regulation of plant growth will be the subject 
of a special clinic instructed by Martha Ludes Garra. 
Bring your problems to the Spray Schedule Clinic on 
Monday evening, March 18, at 8:00 P.M., in the 
Society rooms. Registration fee, $2.00 per member. 

For April, Mrs. Garra has planned a lecture and 
workshop series. Selection and Planting of Trees and 
Shrubs. In the first session special emphasis will be 
placed on selecting reliable plants which increase in 
distinction with maturity. It will be held in the Society 
rooms on April 4 at 7:30 P.M. The following Saturday 
morning, April 6, at 10:00 A.M. a practical demon- 
stration of how to plant a tree and shrub border, using 
both ball-and-burlap and bare-root specimens, will be 
held in Mrs. Garra's garden. Ambler. Registration for 
the two sessions is $5.00 and is limited to 15 members. 

Later in April, Ernesta Drinker Ballard will con- 
duct a garden clinic on bonsai. This oriental art is 
becoming increasingly popular and, while real mastery 
requires years of study and practice, some under- 
standing of the techniques involved will help you to 
create bonsai which should improve as they grow 
older provided they are cared for properlv. In this 
clinic, each participant will be supplied with a plant 
to prune, wire, pot and to take home. To insure indi- 
vidual attention, enrollment is limited to twelve 
members. The clinic will be held at Mrs. Ballard's 
barn in Chestnut Hill on April 18 at 1 :30 P.M. Regis- 
tration fee, including plant, pot and materials, is $8.00. 
CLINICS FOR MAY AND JUNE 

The Garden Clinics Committee has announced its 
schedule for the Spring season. Dates and subjects 
are: 

May 2 Techniques of Flower Bed Management 

May 14 L^se of Color in the Garden 

May 23 Plant Treasures 

June 4 Chrysanthemums to Show 

June 15 Color Photography for Gardeners 

See last page for registration coupon for March 
and April Clinics. Others will be listed as schedule 
date approaches. 



PLANT EXCHANGE APRIL 27 

It is the time to prepare for the 1963 Plant 
Exchange. Perhaps you can projiagate some of your 
favorite indoor plants or start some seedlings or make 
plans for dividing some choice perennials. Remember 
— the better the variety and condition of your plants, 
the more points you earn for bartering. To qualify 
for trading in the Connoiseur's Corner you must bring 
in |)lants suitable for it, but the Jilain Floor and 
Bargain Basement also serve up their surprises, too! 



LANDSCAPE SCHOOL -COURSE II 

Landscape School — Course II — with special 
emphasis on the methods and techniques of landscape 
design — will be held April 22-24 in the Strawbridge 
and Clothier Auditorium, Market Street, Philadelphia. 
Lectures are on Monday and Tuesday, 9:30 A.M. -4:00 
P.M. and the examination on Wednesday. 

Anyone interested in the subject may register for 
the lectures. Registration fees: $12.50 for members 
of the Garden Club Federation of Pennsylvania and 
The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society; $15.00 to 
all others. 

Program and additional information sent out on 
request by writing to the Horticultural Society or 
contacting Mrs. Gustav C. Ballenberg of Huntingdon 
Valley, Chairman of the School. 



OFFICERS ELECTED 



Mr. R. Gwynne Stout of Ardmore was elected 
President of The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society 
at the January 16th meeting of the Council. Mr. Stout 
succeeds Mr. Henry D. Mirick, whose third term 
expired on that date. 

Many members have enjoyed seeing Mr. Stout's 
excellent bonsai at the Philadelphia Flower Show and 
in special exhibits which the Society has staged from 
time to time. 

Also elected, at the same meeting, were : Vice 
Presidents — Mrs. E. Page Allinson, Mr. J. Liddon 
Pennock, Jr. and Mr. Carroll R. Wetzel ; Secretary — 
Miss Estelle L. Sharp; Treasurer — Mr. John G. 
Williams. 



DAFFODIL JUDGING SCHOOL 

Judging Course II of The American Daffodil 
Society will be presented on April 30 at Whittier 
House, Swarthmore College Campus, Swartlimore. Pa. 
The course is s])onsored by the North East region, 
American DaiTodil Society, Mrs. Francis L. Harrigan, 
Vice President. Mrs. H. Rowland Timms, a member 
of the Council of The Pennsylvania Horticultural 
Society, is Chairman of the School. 

Anyone may register for the lecture sessions, but 
to be eligible to take the examination for credit one 
must be a member of the American Daffodil Society. 
This one day school will consist of lectures on cultural 
practices, judging ethics and point scoring. A written 
examination and test judging of a small show will 
take place in the afternoon. Registration fee $5.00, 
including luncheon. (Registration coupon, l)ack page) 



NEW BOOKS IN OUR LIBRARY 



Michigan wild flowers by Helen V. Smith, illus. by Ruth 

Powell Brede. Bloomtield Hills, Mich., Cranbrook Inst. 

Sci. Bull. 42. ( Distb. by University Publications) 1962. 

xii, 465 pp. illus. 17 col. pis. 1961. 

Michigan is unique in its combination of extensive forests 
of broad-leaved trees, vast areas of jack-pine plains, bits of 
prairie and long shoreline. The abundance of vvildflowers 
enjoyed by both residents and tourists has indicated the need 
of a good flower book, and this study has been prepared to 
meet it. An introduction (concerning growing and conserva- 
tion) and extended chapters on monocotyledons and dico- 
tyledons make up the greater portion of the book. Selected 
references and a glossary of all terms likely to be unfamiliar 
to the layman are included. Indexes may also be found to 
both Latin and common names. Both colored and inked 
illustrations make this a handy guide to the amateur and 
professional botanist. 
The New York Times garden book ed. by Joan Lee Faust. 

New York, Knopf, 1962. 413 pp. illus. $6.95. 

A collection of articles which have appeared in the garden 
pages of The New York Times. The list of authors is im- 
pressive and many of the individual articles are excellent. The 
weakness of the book is in the fact that it is a collection, and 
the articles become but samples to whet the gardener's appetite. 

MEMBERS' EVENINGS 

"Remedies for Front Yards" is the subject of the 
Members' Evening program on Tuesday, March 5. 
Carlton B. Lees, Director of the Horticultural Society, 
will discuss and demonstrate solutions to front yard 
landscaping with special emphasis on small properties. 
Members are invited to bring plans and snapshots for 
blackboard discussion. Since only a limited number 
of problems can be treated, members especially inter- 
ested in having their front yard problems analyzed 
are urged to contact Mr. Lees in advance. 

The library opens at 6:30 P.M. for the convenience 
of members. 

On April 2, Mrs. Francis L. Harrigan, Regional 
Vice-President, American Daffodil Society, will show 
slides and fresh cut daffodils and will discuss daffodil 
culture in the Delaware Valley. 



NEW HEADQUARTERS -(cont'd) 

ings: Old St. Joseph's Church, the oldest Roman 
Catholic church in Philadelphia (1734), and Carpen- 
ters' Hall where the first Continental Congress met 
in 1774. 

With the increased space, gardens and activities 
which the new headquarters make possible, the Society 
will increase its staff and will be needing many new 
furnishings as well as display materials, projection and 
public address equipment and many objects necessary 
to maintaining greenhouse and gardens. Henry D. 
Mirick of Ardmore is Chairman of the New Head- 
quarters Development Committee, and the House 
Committee is co-chaired by Mrs. Henry W. Breyer, Jr. 
of Haverford and Mrs. Van Horn Ely of Paoli. 

Meml)ers will have an opportunity to see the 
plans and sketches of the new headquarters and gar- 
dens at the Philadelphia Flower Show. 



Plant explorer David Fairchild by Beryl Williams and Samuel 
Epstein. New York, Messner, 1961. 192 pp. $3.25. 
David Fairchild (1896-1954), plant explorer, was respon- 
sible for the introduction of thousands of species of plants to 
the L'nited States. His curiosity and collecting instinct led 
him to remote places where he hunted for new food plants, 
fiber plants and ornamentals. His writings (The World Was My 
Garden. The World Grows Around My Door, Exploring for Plants 
and others) are an important part of horticultural literature. 
He lived in a particularly dynamic period, was a part of the 
main stream of the time (Mrs. Fairchild was the daughter of 
Alexander Graham Bell) and was instrumental in convincing 
the United States Department of Agriculture that it should 
support the introduction of exotic plants to this country. To 
him American gardeners owe a great deal; this short biography 
they will find informative. 

The covered garden by Kenneth Lemmon. London, Museum 

Press (Distributed by Burns, MacEachern) 1962. 284 pp. 

illus. 8 pis. $5.75. 

First beginnings, orangeries and hot houses, a conducted 
tour of English historic greenhouse developments, general tech- 
niques (glass, heating, ventilation and shape) and much more 
about gardens under cover. Collinson and Bartram's contribu- 
tions along with those of early plant hunters, everywhere, 
indicate that hardiness is as important for collectors as for 
species. Jungle plants and orchids receive particularly close 
attention. 

While the 20th century has not so generously favored cov- 
ered gardens, some evidence of their revival can be noted. An 
excellent bibliography and helpful index along with photo- 
graphs and inked illustrations provide useful adjuncts. 

The world of roses by Bertram Park. New York, Dutton, 1962. 

(48) pp. 128 pages of color plates. $12.50. 

Brilliant photographs of over 200 varieties of roses from 
new hybrids to old species. Some of the photos evoke the 
June fragrance of roses; some are less successful. 

A decade of synthetic chelating agents in inorganic plant 

nutrition by .-Arthur Wallace, Ed. Los Angeles, Wallace, 

1962. 195 pp, illus., tables. $6. 

A good, up-to-date book for the horticulturist who is inter- 
ested in how plants are able to absorb and use trace elements 
and why these are necessary. 

A composite of several experiments dealing with chelating 
agents, this edition includes over forty pages of references to 
literature. The chapter devoted to questions and answers is 
probably the section most helpful to the home gardener. 
Recommendations on methods of application and amounts of 
chelating materials are included. Although this book was not 
written for the amateur horticulturist, he will find some 
sections of it interesting. (Reviewed by Gerald D. Laulis) 

RECENT ARRIVALS FROM ENGLAND: 

Some good garden plants by Patrick M. Synge and James 

W. O. Piatt. New ed. Royal Horticultural Society, 1962. 

232 pp. illus. 25s. 
PAPERBACKS: 
Water gardens by Frances Perry. Penguin Books, 1962. 169 

pp. illus. 7s, 6d. 
Tree fruit growing by Raymond Bush. Revised ed. (bv E. G. 

Gilbert) Penguin Books, 1962. 359 pp. illus. 12s, 6d. 
House plants by Margaret E. Jones. Penguin Books, 1962. 

208 pp. illus. 8s, 6d. 

Gardening the modern way by Roy Hay. Penguin Books, 
1962. 136 pp. illus. 6s. 

GIFTS TO THE LIBRARY 

The Nursery Manual by Liberty Hyde Bailey, given by 
William H. Frederick, Jr., of Hockessin. Delaware. 

Bonsai — photos of now famous miniature trees (Vol. 5), giv€n 
by R. Gwynne Stout of Ardmore. 

Plant Nematodes (Special Report of the .Agricultural Research 
Service, United States Department of Agriculture), given 
by Dr. J. J. Willaman, of Plymouth Meeting. 

Several early periodicals devoted to wildflowers were given 
by Mrs. Emery Burnett of Narberth. 



THE PENNSYLVANIA HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 



Carroll R. Wetzel 



Secretary 

Miss Estelle L. Sharp 



OFFICERS 

President 

R. Gwynne Stout 

Vice Presidents 

Mrs. E. Page Allinson 



J. L.iddon Peniiock, Jr. 

Treasurer 
John G. Williams 



Term Ending Decennber 31, 1963: 

Mrs. E. Page Allinson 
Mrs. Frederic L. Ballard 
Dr. John M. Fogg, Jr. 
Mr. George Wood Furness 
Mrs. H. Cameron Morris, Jr. 
Mr. Frederick W^ G. Peck 
Mr. Richard H. L. Sexton 
Miss Estelle L. Sharp 
Mr. John G. Williams 



EXECUTIVE COUNCIL 

Term Ending December 31, 1964: 
Mrs. Van Horn Ely 
Mr. Theodore Foulk, II 
Mrs. James C. Hornor 
Mr. J. Liddon Pennock. Jr. 
Mrs. J. Pancoast Reath 
Mrs. Francis H. Scheetz 
Mr. R. Gwynne Stout 
Mrs. H. Rowland Timms 
Mr. J. B. Townsend, Jr. 



Term Ending December 31, 1965: 
Mrs. Henry W. Breyer, Jr. 
Mr. W. Atlee Burjiee. Jr. 
Mr. George R. Clark 
Mrs. Franklin d'Olier 
Mrs. Edward L. Elliot 
Mr. Henry D. Mirick 
Dr. J. Franklin Styer 
Mr. Richard Thomson 
Mr. Carroll R. Wetzel 



COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN FOR 1963 



Executive: George R. Clark 
Finance: John G. Williams 
Library: Miss Estelle L. Sharp 
Richard H. L. Sexton 
Awards : John M. Fogg, Jr. 
Garden Visits: J. B. Townsend, Jr. 
Azalea Garden: Frederick W. G. Peck 
Philadelphia Flower Show: Mrs. H. Cameron Morris 
New Headquarters Development: Henry D. Mirick 
House Committee: Mrs. Henry W. Breyer, Jr. 
Mrs. Van Horn Ely 



Special Gifts: Carroll R. Wetzel 
^lembership: Richard Thomson 
Editorial: Mrs. Frederic L. Ballard 
Spring Luncheon : Mrs. J. Pancoast Reath 
Educational Exhibits: Mrs. James C. Hornor 
Chrysanthemum Show: William H. Weber 
Iris Show: Mrs. E. A. Chariott 
Lectures: Mrs. Frederic L. Ballard 
Members' Evenings: Mrs. H. Rowland Timms 
Garden Clinics : Mrs. J. J. Willaman 
Plant Exchange: Richard H. L. Sexton 



OFFICE STAFF 



Carlton B. Lees, Director 
Nancy G. Urian, Horticulturist 
John A. Miller, Librarian (part-time) 



Sharon P. MacKenzie, Secretary to the Director 
Catherine E. Taggart, Membership Secretary 
Florence Townsend, Bookkeeper (part-time) 



OFFICE TELEPHONE: LO 3-8352 
MAILING ADDRESS: 389 Suburban Station Building, Philadelphia 3, Pa. 



SCHEDULE OF EVENTS 

(Additional dates will be added as activities are scheduled) 

MARCH 5 

Members' Evening: Remedies for Front Yards 

MARCH 10-16 

Philadelphia Flower Show 

MARCH 12 

Spring Luncheon 

MARCH 18 

Garden Clinic : Spraying 

APRIL 2 

Members' Evening: Daffodils 

APRIL 4, 6 

Garden Clinic : Trees and Shrubs 

APRIL 18 

Garden Clinic: Bonsai 

APRIL 22-24 

Landscape School, Course II, Garden Federation 
of Pennsylvania 

APRIL 27 

Plant Exchange 

APRIL 30 

Daffodil Judging School 

MAY 2 

Garden Clinic : Flower Bed Management 

MAY 6-10 

Annual Meeting, Garden Club of America, 
Philadelphia 

MAY 12 

Garden Visits — Chestnut Hill 
MAY 14 

Garden Clinic : Use of Color in the Garden 
MAY 23 

Garden Clinic : Plant Treasures 
MAY 25 

Delaware Valley Iris Show 
JUNE 2 

Garden Visits — Media and Wilmington 
JUNE 4 

Garden Clinic : Chrysanthemums to Show 
JUNE 15 

Garden Clinic: Color Photography for Gardeners 
SEPTEMBER 17-19 

Annual Meeting, Garden Club 

Federation of Pennsylvania, Pocono Manor 
OCTOBER 1 

Members' Evening 

OCTOBER 9-11 

American Horticultural Congress, St. Louis 

NOVEMBER 2-3 

Chrysanthemum Show 

(cont'd, bottom next column) 



SOME FACTS AND FIGURES 
FROM FISCAL YEAR 1961-2 

The fiscal year of The Pennsylvania Horticultural 
Society is from October 1 to September 30. Here are 
-some facts and figures from last year which may be 
of interest: 

Library Committee 

Two hundred seventy one books were accessioned, 
of which 110 were received as review copies, 42 
purchased, 89 were gifts and 30 volumes were bound 
periodicals. 

Circulation totalled 2,000 (450 by mail). 

New shelving was installed and all books pub- 
lished in 1950 and since then, have been placed to- 
gether in a browsing collection for quick reference. 

Book sales to members brought $241.12 to the 
library fund, paying for all books purchased during 
the year. 

Membership Committee 
Membership fluctuated between the various 
catagories with the following changes: 

Annual members Loss 163 

Family members Gain 50 

Contributing members Gain 3 

Sustaining members Loss 1 
Special (introductory 

9 months) Gain 57 



Net loss 54 



Income from memberships dropped $294.00 for 
the year. 

Editorial Committee 

The NEWS continued to attract attention, its 
horticultural articles being reprinted in full by other 
publications nine known times during the year. Ex- 
cerpts from the NEWS appeared in several publica- 
tions. 

Garden Clinics Committee 

Activity in this program is best indicated with 
the following facts : there were 264 registrations for 
Garden Clinics during the year. The ci?mmittee ex- 
pended $736.00 and received $675.00 in registrations, 
leaving a net cost to the Society of $61.35. 



NOVEMBER 5 

Members' Evening 

NOVEMBER 20 

Annual Meeting, Pa. Horticultural Society 

DECEMBER 3 

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Register by using the clip-out coupon. Please enclose check and 
mail to 3S9 Suburban Station, Phila. 3. Registrations accepted in the 
order received; confirmation by return post card. 



DAFFODIL JUDGING SCHOOL 
COURSE II 

Registration $5.00 (includes luncheon). 

Name - 

Street - - 



City „....„ -....- 

Telephone - 

□ I am a member of American Daffodil 
Society 

□ I am a member of The Pennsylvania 
Horticultural Society 

GARDEN CLINIC REGISTRATION 

Please accept my reservation for: 
n SPRAY PROGRAMS 
($2.00) 
March 18 8:00 P.M. 

D TREES AND SHRUBS 
IN YOUR GARDEN 
($5.00 for the series) 
April 4 7:30 P.M. 

April 6 10:00 A.M. 



n BONSAI 
($8.00) 
April 18 

Name 

Street „.. 

City 

Telephone 



1 :30 P.M. 



7:30 P.M 



DATES To Mark On Your CALENDAR 

MARCH 5 MEMBERS' EVENING 7:30 P.M. 

REMEDIES FOR FRONT YARDS 

389 Suburban Station Building 

MARCH 12 SPRING LUNCHEON 12:30 P.M. 

Bellevue-Stratford Hotel 
MARCH 18 GARDEN CLINIC: 

SPRAY PROGRAMS 

389 Suburban Station Building 

APRIL 2 MEMBERS' EVENING: 

DAFFODILS IN VARIETY 

389 Suburban Station Building 

APRIL 4, 6 GARDEN CLINIC: 

TREES AND SHRUBS FOR YOUR GARDEN 

389 Suburban Station Building 
(April 6 — Ambler) 

APRIL 18 GARDEN CLINIC: 

BONSAI 

Chestnut Hill 

APRIL 27 PLANT EXCHANGE 

Chestnut Hill 

APRIL 30 DAFFODIL JUDGING SCHOOL 

Swarthmore 



PHILADELPHIA FLOWER SHOW 

March 10-16, 1963 

Sunday 1 :00 - 7:00 P.M. 

Monday - Saturday 10:00 A.M.- 10:00 P.M. 

MEMBERS' PREVIEW: NOON SUNDAY 



THE Pennsylvania' 


1 


l^^l 


VOL 


IV No. 


4 APRIL, 1963 


^^«|r|DMAR^^^H 


-1 


1 


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^17 PENNSYLVANIA BOULEVARD 
PHILADELPHIA 3. PENNSYLVANIA 


\ 







NEW EASTERN PENNSYLVANIA 
CHRYSANTHEMUM SHOW LAUNCHED 

An all new regional Chrysanthemum Show has 
been scheduled for November 2-3 in the magnificent 
headquarters of The American Baptist Convention 
at Valley Forge. The Pennsylvania Horticultural 
Society is acting as coordinator of the event which 
is co-sponsored with the Men's Chrysanthemum Club 
of Norristown, the Delaware Valley Chrysanthemum 
Society, the Germantown Horticultural Society, the 
Burholme Horticultural Society, both the Philadelphia 
and Wilmington branches of the National Association 
of Gardeners, and the Norristown and Valley Forge 
Garden Clubs. Mr. William H. Weber of Erdenheim 
Farms, is chairman of the event. 

Schedules will be supplied to participating organ- 
izations and exhibitors in recent shows. Anyone else in- 
terested in exhibiting may obtain a schedule by writing 
or telephoning The Pennsylvania Horticultural 
Society (LO 3-8352). 

SPECIAL RADCLIFFE CLASS 

Rooted cuttings of an unknown chrysanthemum 
variety will be provided to anyone wishing to enter 
competition for the Wayne W. Radcliffe trophy. 

These plants must be grown as disbudded bush 
plants, each in an 8" pot (last pinch suggested about 
August 1). Protection from frost is allowed. Ex- 
hibitors are required to show all surviving plants. 

Applications for entering this class must be re- 
ceived, in writing, before May 1. Plants must be 
obtained from Mr. Weber, Erdenheim Farms, May 
1-20. They cannot be mailed. 

SPECIAL CLINICS 

Because of the attention given to the small 
flowered, modified cascade and bonsai chrysanthe- 
mums in last year's show at Norristown, the Garden 
Clinics committee has scheduled a special session 
flevoted to this subject, June 4. 

Members attending will receive a small plant 
ready to grow and train through the summer months. 
Other information on chrysanthemum growing, both 
in containers and in the garden, will be included. 
For registration information, see the May NEWS. 



SOILLESS MIX FOR STARTING PLANTS 

In January 1962, a formula for a growing medium 
for plants was released by Cornell University to 
growers in New York for trial. The result of extensive 
research, the medium contains no soil and can be used 
for starting seedlings and for growing plants for 
even longer periods. For small quantities the formula 
is as follows: 





TO MAKE 


Vermiculite 


One Peck 


One Cubic Yd. 


(No. 2 Terralite) 


4 qts. 


11 bushels 


Shredded peat moss 


4 qts. 


11 bushels 


20% superphosphate 






(powdered) 


1 tbs.* 


2y2 pounds 


Ground limestone 


2y2 tbs. 


10 pounds 


Use one but not both 






33% (fertilizer grade) 






Ammonium nitrate 


1^ tbs. 


3 pounds 


or 

5-10-5 fertilizer 


4 tbs. 


12 pounds 



* Level tablespoonfuls 

Mix the ingredients on a table or clean floor. 
Before setting plants or sowing seed, put the medium 
in the desired container (pot, flat, etc.) and place 
the container in water and allow medium to soak 
thoroughly (the water coming up through the bottom 
of the container). Let drain for 30 minutes and then 
soak again. Then plant, or sow seed ; water only as 
needed. 

If this medium is used for indoor plants which 
will be grown for a long period, supplemental feeding 
with a water soluble fertilizer at the recommended 
rate and frequency is required. In small pots (less 
than 3") the medium tends to dry out quickly, so it 
is better suited to larger containers. 

Members trying this Cornell mix are urged to 
report their results to the Society. 



DR. WISTER RECEIVES SOCIETY AWARD 

The Certificate of Merit of The Pennsylvania 
Horticultural Society was presented to Dr. John 
C. Wister, of Swarthmore, at the Annual Spring 
Luncheon of the Society, March 12, at the Bellevue 
Stratford Hotel. The citation on the Certificate reads, 
"awarded to John C. Wister in recognition of his 

(cont'd on page 2) 



MRS. BALLARD APPOINTED 
EXECUTIVE SECRETARY 

Eniesta Drinker Ballard was appointed Executive 
Secretary of The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society 
at the regular Council meeting in February, to become 
effective June 1, 1963. Mrs. Ballard will replace Carlton 
B. Lees who, on the same date, takes up his new post 
as Executive Secretary and Director of Publications 
for the Massachusetts Horticultural Society in Boston. 

Mrs. Ballard has gained national recognition for 
her books Garden in Your House and The Art of 
Training Plants, and is well known throughout the 
Delaware Valley area for her horticultural activities. 
She is a graduate of The Pennsylvania School of 
Horticulture for Women (now the Ambler Campus 
of Temple University), is a Garden Clinics Instructor 
and a former member of the Council of The Penn- 
sylvania Horticultural Society. Her Philadelphia 
Flower Show exhibits in recent years have attracted 
much attention. 

Mrs. Ballard is also a member of the Advisory 
Board of Ambler Campus of Temple University, the 
Advisory Council of the Morris Arboretum and the 
Board of Directors of the Neighborhood Garden 
Association of Philadelphia. 



PLANT EXCHANGE - APRIL 27 

The annual plant exchange for members of The 
Pennsylvania Horticultural Society will be held Sat- 
urday, April 27 in the barn at the residence of Mr. 
and Mrs. Frederic L. Ballard, Northwestern Avenue 
and Thomas Road, Chestnut Hill. 

Plants for exchange must be received before 

10:00 A.M. 
Trading begins at 11:00 A.M. 

Quality plants are wanted. Well grown peren- 
nials and unusual shrubs, both deciduous and ever- 
green (balled and burlapped) will earn many points 
for Main Floor bartering. To trade in the Connois- 
seur's Corner bring in exceptional plants in top 
condition. Bargain Basement material will still be 
accepted but limits the donor to trading in that 
department only. 



MEMBERS' EVENINGS 

Mrs. Francis L. Harrigan, Regional Vice Presi- 
dent of the American Daffodil Society, will show 
slides of choice daffodil varieties and will discuss the 
culture of them on April 2, 7:30 P. M., 389 Suburban 
Station Building. If the weather is cooperative, she 
will also have cut specimens for display and comment. 

The library opens at 6:30 for the convenience 
of members. 

Since most members are busy gardening during 
the summer months, the Members' Evenings programs 
will be in recess from May through September. 



GARDEN VISITS - MAY 12 

The first Garden Visits day for members of the 
Society and their guests will take place on Sunday, 
May 12, 2:00-6:00 P.M. in Chestnut Hill. The 
following gardens will be open: Mr. and Mrs. W. 
Beaumont Whitney, 510 E. Evergreen Avenue; Mrs. 
Frederick Rosengarten, 500 West Chestnut Avenue ; 
Mr. and Mrs. Frederick W. G. Peck, 8420 St. Martin's 
Lane; Mr. and Mrs. Horace C. Jones II, 8305 Sem- 
inole Avenue. 

This year, members wishing to take guests, may 
order guest tickets in advance, at $1.00 each, from 
the office of the Society. 



Dr. Wister Receives Award — (cont'd) 

distinguished services to this Society and to American 
horticulture, March 12, 1%3". 

In presenting the award, R. Gwynne Stout, Presi- 
dent of the Society, called attention to Dr. Wister's 
many contributions to horticulture. As author of many 
books, such as Bulbs for American Gardens, Four 
Seasons in Your Garden, and as editor of the Women's 
Home Companion Garden Book, Dr. Wister has helped 
gardeners at all levels of accomplishment to become 
better informed. His latest contribution to horticul- 
tural literature is as Editor of The Peonies, a compre- 
hensive treatment of both herbaceous and tree peonies, 
published late last year by The American Horticul- 
tural Society. 

Dr. Wister was instrumental in establishing the 
Scott Foundation at Swarthmore College, in 1930, 
working with Mrs. Arthur Hoyt Scott who founded 
it as a memorial to her late husband. The result- 
ing displays of ornamental plants, both woody and 
herbaceous, continue to serve as a source of inspiration 
and information for eastern Pennsylvania gardeners 
and horticulturists. Dr. Wister continues as Director 
of the Foundation and is also Director of the Tyler 
Arboretum in Lima. He also served as Secretary of 
The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society from January 
1928, until December 1952, and in 1939 received the 
Society's Centenary Gold Medal "in recognition of the 
valuable contributions he has made to horticulture 
and in appreciation of his loyal service to this Society." 

Dr. and Mrs. Wister (the former Gertrude Smith, 
also a professional horticulturist) live at 735 Harvard 
Avenue in Swarthmore. Both are active in local, 
national and international horticultural organizations. 



PLANT SALE AT AMBLER 

The Ambler Campus of Temple University will 
hold its annual Spring Plant Sale on Tuesday, May 7, 
10:00 A.M. -4:00 P.M. The sale includes a wide selec- 
tion of potted plants, garden flowers, herbs, gardening 
accessories and natural preserves and jellies ; lunch 
available. 



MY GARDEN IN SPRING 

My garden in spring bv E. A. Bowles, London, New York, 
Dodge, 1914. xx, 308 p. illus. (12 col. pis.) (.No price 
given, O. P.) 

Although new garden books have a fascination for all of 
•us, there are old ones that have become guides and friends 
over the years, to which we turn again and again. Such a 
book is E. A. Bowles' My Garden in Spring. Written in 1914, 
it depicts a world that is now gone, but plant information 
lies within its covers that one has to hunt far to find else- 
where. Even more important, perhaps, is that priceless, vital 
quality — enthusiasm. To those who think a garden is a 
terrace with a barbecue, or to those who continually search 
for less work in their gardens, this book will not appeal. 
Mr. Bowles, an authority on crocus, daffodils and snowdrops, 
was an eminent British gardener, the author of many books 
and innumerable articles. 

It is to John C. Wister that I am grateful for introducing 
me to Mr. Bowles bv way of quotations in his own fine book 
Bulbs for American Gardens. I remember my excitement in 
finding a copy of My Garden in Spring in a New York book- 
store during the war (.for it is out of print). Miss Samuel, 
our Society's Librarian for 25 years, teased me when I told 
her of my "find", by remarking that now that I had my own 
copy this book might stay longer on the library's shelves. 

After a long cold winter like this one of 1963, turn to 
Mr. Bowles and read about early irises, snowdrops, crocus, 
some of the good old daflfodils, primulas and anemones. To 
be sure, he writes of an English garden in a chatty style so 
different from our cut-and-dried "how to do it" books of 
today, but if the difference in climate is kept in mind there 
are worlds of information applicable to our gardens. Bemg 
an artist, he brings to our attention details which the casual 
observer might entirely miss. After reading his description 
of the method in which a snowdrop pierces the hard ground 
you will look at your next snowdrop with a different eye! 
Instead of being discouraged by the rabbits who eat off your 
crocus, you mav find yourself growing a large collection in 
a cold frame. It is interesting to find Mr. Bowles, in 1924, 
describing the daffodil "Dawn" as his greatest favorite. I 
remember seeing this variety in the distinguished garden of 
Mr. Frederic P. Lee in Washington, D. C, when the American 
Daffodil Society met there in 1956. Few were familiar with 
it at that time. Now we find it displayed in our daffodil 
shows — a graceful flower suitable for our smaller gardens. 

This is not a book to read just once. Come back to it 
year after year and you will find something new as your own 
knowledge grows with the passage of time. — Estelle L. Sharp. 



"A WORLD OF FLOWERS" AT 
PHILADELPHIA MUSEUM OF ART 

The Philadelphia Museum of Art will present a 
comprehensive exhibition, "A World of Flowers^ 
Masterpieces of Flower Paintings and Prints", May 
2 to June 9, in honor of the Garden Club of America, 
which will hold its fiftieth Annual Meeting in Phila- 
delphia, May 6 to May 10. 

A special Garden Club Day will take place on 
Friday, May 10, at noon, for members of the Horti- 
cultural Society and area garden clubs who would 
enjoy seeing not only the exhibition but the elaborate 
decorations staged in the Oriental Wing, the Cloister, 
the Great Hall, and other galleries by the Garden 
Club of America members. 

Reservations, including box lunch and admission 
to the Museum : $2.00, in advance. Reservation forms 
are available from the Societv and the Museum. 



GARDEN CLINICS FOR APRIL AND MAY 

With this year's Philadelphia Flower Show past, 
it is time to start gardening — and what better way 
to start than with the Garden Clinics which can help 
you become a better gardener? 

Martha Ludes Garra's two-part Clinic, Selecting 
and Planting Trees and Shrubs, provides the oppor- 
tunity. The first session is Thursday, April 4, 389 
Suburban Station Building, 7:30 P.M. The second 
session, with practical demonstration in the instruc- 
tor's own garden, is scheduled for April 6, 10:00 A. M. 
(rain date, April 13) at Ambler. Registration fee, 
$5.00 for series of two; limited to fifteen members. 

Ernesta Drinker Ballard will conduct another of 
her popular bonsai clinics on Thursday, April 18, 
1 :30 P. M. at Valley Gardens. Each registered 
member will receive a plant to prune, wire and plant 
in a bonsai pot. Fee, including materials, $8.00; 
limited to twelve members. 

Three clinics are offered in May. Mrs. Ballard 
will demonstrate, especially for beginners, Techniques 
of Flower Bed Management. Included will be prep- 
aration of the soil, renovation of existing flower beds, 
division of perennials, the planting of annuals, fertil- 
izing, spraying and luany other practices, including a 
review of the baffling array of materials available in 
garden supply stores. At Valley Gardens, Chestnut 
Hill, Thursday, May 2, 1 :30 P. M. Fee, $2.50. 

Color in the Garden is the second offering of May. 
Mrs. Garra will discuss color as a tool in garden de- 
sign. Color in flowers and foliage, how to use it to 
increase or decrease the apparent size of a garden, 
the importance of foliage color after bloom are factors 
which will be handled. Mrs. Garra will illustrate her 
points with fresh flowers, foliage and swatches of 
color. Even if you do not garden, the Committee feels 
that the inforiuation will help you to see more in 
gardens, everywhere. The date: Tuesday, May 14, 
1 :30 P. M., 389 Suburban Station Building. Fee $2.00. 

At the peak of the flowering season, the Clinics 
Committee has scheduled Swarthmore's Plant Treas- 
ures. The plantings which are a part of the Arthur 
Hoyt Scott Foundation at Swarthmore College, are 
unique because special emphasis is placed on selecting 
plants which are suited to eastern Pennsylvania 
gardens. Mrs. Garra will point out what makes a 
plant "good": quality and quantity of bloom, duration 
of bloom, foliage, and many other factors. She will 
emphasize how these plants can be used in home 
gardens. Thursday, May 23, 1 :30 P. M., starting at 
the Scott Memorial Building, Swarthmore Campus 
(wear walking shoes!). Fee $2.00, limited to twenty 
members. 

Registration is required for all Garden Clinics; 
see back page for coupon. 



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LANDSCAPE SCHOOL, COURSE II 
April 22-24 

Strawbridge & Clothier Auditorium 
Philadelphia 

Registration : $12.50 for members of the 
Garden Club Federation of Pennsylvania and 
The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society; $15.00 
to all others. Program available on request. 



Register by using the clip-out coupon. Please enclose check and 
mail to 389 Suburban Station, Phila. 3. Registrations accepted in the 
order received; confirmation by return post card. 



GARDEN CLINIC REGISTRATION 



n 



n 



Please accept my reservation for: 

TREES AND SHRUBS IN YOUR GARDEN 

($5.00 for the series) 



April 4 
April 6 


7:30 P. M. 
10:00 A. M. 


Society Rooms 
Ambler, Pa. 


BONSAI 
($8.00) 
April 18 


1:30 P.M. 


Chestnut Hill 



D 



D 



TECHNIQUES OF FLOWER BED 

MANAGEMENT 

($2.50) 

May 2 1:30 P.M. Chestnut Hill 

COLOR IN THE GARDEN 

($2.00) 

May 14 1:30 P.M. Society Rooms 

SWARTHMORE'S PLANT TREASURES 

($2.00) 

May 23 1:30 P.M. Swarthmore Campus 



Name 
Street 



City 



Telephone 



DATES To Mark On Your CALENDAR 

APRIL 2 MEMBERS' EVENING: 7:30 P.M 

DAFFODILS IN VARIETY 
APRIL 4, 6 GARDEN CLINIC: 

TREES AND SHRUBS FOR YOUR GARDEN 
APRIL 18 GARDEN CLINIC: 1:30 P.M. 

BONSAI 
APRIL 22-24 LANDSCAPE SCHOOL - COURSE II 
APRIL 27 PLANT EXCHANGE 
APRIL 30 DAFFODIL JUDGING SCHOOL 
MAY 2 GARDEN CLINIIC: 1 :30 P.M. 

FLOWER BED PREPARATION, PLANTING 
MAY 6 - 10 ANNUAL MEETING, GARDEN CLUB OF AMERICA 
MAY 12 GARDEN VISITS 
MAY 14 GARDEN CLINIC: 1 :30 P.M. 

COLOR IN GARDEN DESIGN 
MAY 23 GARDEN CLINIC: 1 :30 P.M. 

SWARTHMORE'S PLANT TREASURES 
MAY 25 DELAWARE VALLEY IRIS SHOW 

American Daffodil Society 
DAFFODIL JUDGING SCHOOL - COURSE II 

April 30, 1963 
Whittier House, Swarthmore College Campus 

Lectures on cultural practices, judging ethics, point 
scoring. (Written examination for members of the Daflfodil 
Society only; others may attend without taking examinations.) 

DAFFODIL JUDGING SCHOOL - COURSE II 

Registration $5.00, including luncheon 

Name 

Street 

City 

Telephone ~ 

n Member, American Daffodil Society 

n Member, The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society 



THE PENNSYLVANIA 
HORTICULTURAL 



SOCIE- 



1617 PENNSYLVANIA BOULEVARD 
PHILADELPHIA 3, PENNSYLVANIA 



H°£^ 




VOL IV No. 5 



MAY, 1963 



FOR MASSES OF COLOR, GROW BIENNIALS 



Biennials, as a group, have a number of highly 
desirable characteristics. They provide masses of 
bloom in June and early July after spring's first burst 
is past and continue to provide color until annuals 
take over for summer. They are moved easily and 
can be placed close together for immediate, spectacu- 
lar effect in any bare spots in the border. In many 
cases their usefulness and life cycles end following 
flowering, so they can be removed to make space 
for later blooming annuals and fall flowering 
chrysanthemums. 

Many biennials come in attractive soft colors 
which seem especially appropriate for June gardens — 
apricots, pinks, pale yellows, appealing blues — and 
they provide interesting shapes : the spikes of fox- 
glove and the flattened globe shapes of sweet William, 
the delicate grace of Iceland poppies. 

The principal reason for the limited use of bien- 
nials is that many gardeners are relucant to spend 
time or money on plants that bloom for six or seven 
weeks and are then discarded. However, for those 
who enjoy growing spectacular plants from seed, 
biennials are thoroughly rewarding. 

Though not absolutely essential, a cold frame 
makes possible far better results than open ground 
culture. Use good, friable soil — sifted compost with 
builder's sand added at the rate of one part sand to 
five parts compost — and be sure to add more soil 
to the frame annually to replace the clumps of soil 
removed when the biennials are transplanted to the 
garden. 

The following biennials are especially recom- 
mended for the Delaware Valley. (Members are urged 
to visit the herbaceous borders at the Ambler Campus 
of Temple University and Longwood Gardens in June 
where most of them can be seen in full flower.) 

Sweet William, {Dianthus barbatus) : Newport 
Pink and Giant White are outstanding varieties which 
flower profusely in June and early July. Seeds should 
be sown in late June for the following year. Plants 
may be wintered in the open, but better ones result 
if given coldframe protection. 

Iceland poppy, (Papaver nudicaule) : Apparently 
out of style, but should be used more, especially the 



variety Coonara Pink. Sow seeds in August and 
transplant into peat pots for wintering in frames or 
in the open. They do not transplant well ; bloom in 
May and June. 

Foxglove, [Digitalis hybrids) : Tall spikes of fox- 
glove are the first plants of the season to give striking 
accents in the border. The beautiful Excelsior strain 
is available in separate pastel colors. Culture is the 
same as for sweet William. When moving finished 
plants to the garden, plant in groups of three to six 
for best effect. 

Canterbury bells, [Campanula medium and C. caly- 
canthema) : Seeds are available in a wide range of 
colors from pinks through lavenders and blues and 
sparkling white. Culture, same as for sweet William. 

Delphinium: The Pacific Giant strain seems to 
produce the finest plants. Good results are reported 
by gardeners who sow seed in early May and trans- 
plant the seedlings into beds in which the soil has 
been sterilized with Vapam, Mylone or formaldehyde. 
Set the young plants in the coldframe in mid-October 
and transplant to the border in April. Seed sown in 
March will produce blooming plants for late summer 
of the same year. 

Pansy: To grow your own, sow seeds in August. 
Transplant the seedlings into flats of sterilized soil or 
directly into the ground or coldframes and winter 
them there. In early spring, transplant to well-drained 
locations in the garden as they do not do well in 
water-logged soil. 

Forget-me-nots and English daisies : Flower early 
with pansies ; culture the same. 

English wallflowers, [Cheiranthus allionij : Easily 
grown biennials with fragrant red, pink, yellow, white 
or orange flowers in late March. Sow seeds in mid- 
August, transplant into frames for the winter and 
move out as soon as the ground can be prepared. 

Snapdragrons : Commonly considered annuals, 
actually perennials, and often successfully grown as 
biennials from summer sown seedlings wintered in a 
coldframe. Be sure to pinch the young seedlings so 
the plants will be low and compact. Growing them 
as biennials rather than annuals produces larger 
plants earlier in the season. (cont'd on pg. 2) 



POT GROWN CHRYSANTHEMUMS 
ARE USEFUL 

On the doorstep, at the edge of the terrace and 
indoors, pot grown chrysanthemums are extremely 
helpful in reflecting the sunshine of October. In 
addition to this, growing chrysanthemums in pots is 
a test of one's horticultural skill. For members who 
would like to learn, first hand, how to grow potted 
chrysanthemums as specimen plants, and small 
flowered varieties as bonsai and cascades, the Garden 
Clinics Committee is offering a special Clinic on Tues- 
day, June 4. (See page 3 for details.) 

A special information sheet on growing chrysan- 
themums in pots, has been prepared for members who 
cannot attend the Clinics and is available from the 
Society, upon request. 

As an extra bonus, if you use named varieties, 
you may end up with plants suitable for exhibition 
in the new Eastern Pennsylvania Chrysanthemum 
Show at Valley Forge, November 2 and 3. 
SPECIAL RADCLIFFE CLASS 

Rooted cuttings of an unknown chrysanthemum 
variety will be provided to anyone wishing to enter 
competition for the Wayne W. Radcliffe trophy. 

These plants must be grown as disbudded bush 
plants, each in an 8-inch pot (last pinch suggested 
about August 1). Protection from frost is allowed. 
Exhibitors are required to show all surviving plants. 

Applications for entering this class must be 
received in writing, before May 1. 

BIENNIALS -(Cont'd) 

Lupines : Russell hybrids are available in several 
shades. Results in this climate will never be as fine 
as gardeners achieve in England and the Pacific 
Northwest, but beautiful plants can be grown using 
the following method. Sow individual seeds in 2V4 
inch pots in mid-July. Put into four inch pots in early 
fall and sink in the coldframe over the winter. Plant 
in the garden in April. Plants will bloom in early 
summer. 

Hollyhocks: Do not transplant easily so set the 
small seedlings into pots, rather than into the ground 
of the coldframe. Seeds sown in August will flower 
the following summer and are most effective as back- 
ground plants. 

Sweet rocket, {Hesperis matronalis) : Not recom- 
mended for a formal border, but lovely in a woodland 
area or informal, shady place. The species is mauve. 
The white (H. matronalis alba) is more attractive. It 
can be sown in late spring where it is to grow and 
usually will self-sow freely thereafter. 

Salvia haematodes: Tall spikes of sky-blue flowers 
for a June border. Though actually a perennial, it is 
best grown as a biennial and removed after flowering, 
as the large basal leaves take up too much room in the 
summer border. Seeds sown in July produce good size 
plants which can be wintered where they are to bloom 
the next year, or in pots in the coldframe. 



IRIS SHOW -MAY 25 

Well grown, quality iris is a choice garden peren- 
nial. For delicacy and mass of color, it is superb, and, 
in addition, the foliage of vigorous plants is attractive 
in the garden even after bloom has passed. 

The opportunity to see choice iris specimens, will 
present itself on Saturday, May 25, at St. Alban's 
Church, Newtown Square. This is the third Show to 
be sponsored cooperatively by the Horticultural So- 
ciety and the Delaware Valley Iris Society. Mrs. E. A. 
Chariott of Rose Valley - Moylan is Chairman. 

The one day show is open to members and to the 
public from noon until 8:00 P.M. 

In addition to the many classes for specimen iris, 
five arrangement classes are included in the schedule. 
The best arrangement is eligible for the American 
Iris Society Purple Rosette, and special A.I.S. awards 
also are given to outstanding specimen blooms. Sched- 
ules are available from the Horticultural Society, 
LO 3-8352 upon request. 



NEW IN THE LIBRARY 

The ladies' home journal book of landscaping and outdoor 
living, by Richard Pratt, Philadelphia, Lippincott, 1963. 225 pp. 
illus. $7.95. 

The flaw in American gardening is in the "doing" of 
gardening. We tend to become a nation of hobbyists and by 
and large fail to recognize gardening as an art — it is the art 
of organizing the out-of-doors for our own use and pleasure. 
The majority of the books which deal with gardening as an 
art seem to be designed for big budgets and many become 
so artificial and brittle, design-wise, that they leave gardening 
out of the garden. 

It is indeed a pleasure, then, to welcome Mr. Pratt's 
Landscaping and Outdoor Living. Superficial considerations aside, 
Mr. Pratt has put together an informative, thoroughly useful 
and at the same time attractive, book. He presents his material 
with imagination and good humor. In addition to his own 
work, he includes photographs of gardens designed by James 
Rose, Ethelbert Furlong and some others. In most cases, Mr. 
Pratt's gardens are superior to the others simply because they 
are more down to earth. Many reveal the fact that they are 
homescapes (Mr. Pratt's word) for quite ordinary houses. 
I have always been suspicious of garden photographs which 
have a staged appearance, as if the whole were built just for 
the camera. While these may produce more photographic 
glamour, I think the technique is dishonest. So, while Mr. 
Pratt's gardens may be less sophisticated in an architectural 
sense than Mr. Rose's et al, they are more realistic, more 
human and, I think, more honest. 

Mr. Pratt makes a courageous attempt to overcome the 
limitations of the language. The word garden as commonly 
used isn't inclusive enough, and landscape is too inclusive, so 
Mr. Pratt coins homescape. I think he should receive an award 
for, at least, effort. 

It's too bad that Ladies' Home Journal Book ol . . . had to 
be tacked onto the title because anyone unfamiliar with Mr. 
Pratt's work might put it down as a decorative, flossy approach, 
which indeed it is not. It is probable that I am more critical 
of titles than most readers and have never been satisfied with 
that of my own book — perhaps we should offer both in plain 
wrappers, mine for those who don't admit having to live on 
a budget and Mr. Pratt's for men who would not Ifke to be 
seen reading anything starting Ladies' Home Journal Book of. . . . 

For home owners knowing that there is more to land- 
scaping than the moustache technique of foundation planning, 
for those realizing that gardening can be more than a hit or 
miss horticultural hodge podge, for anyone interested in or- 
ganizing his outdoor space practically and imaginatively, I 
recommend this book. 

C. B. Lees 



GARDEN VISITS, SUNDAY, MAY 12 

Six gardens in the W'hitemarsh and Chestnut Hill 
areas will be opened to members of the Pennsylvania 
Horticultural Society, on Sunday May 12, 2:00 to 
5:00 P.M. 

ROUTE 

Starting from the Chestnut Hill Station of the 
PRR on Germanto\\n Avenue at Evergreen, proceed 
west and immediately bear right on Bethlehem Pike 
for 3.6 miles. Turn left on Skippack Pike (Rte. 7i 
West) 1.7 miles to the garden of: 

Mr. & Mrs. Orville H. Bullitt 

"Oxmoor", Whitemarsh 
Return on same route via Route 7i and Bethlehem 
Pike to Valley Green Road (2.4 miles) turn right and 
proceed 3^ mile to garden of: 

Mr. & Mrs. George R. Clark, Flourtown 
Leaving Mr. and Mrs. Clark's, continue on Valley 
Green Road to dead end at Stenton Ave., turn left, 
proceed to Bethlehem Pike and continue to Chestnut 
Hill Ave. Turn right (opposite Chestnut Hill Station 
of Reading Railroad) continue beyond Towanda Street 
(total distance 4.2 miles) to garden of: 

Mrs. Frederic Rosengarten 

500 W. Chestnut Hill Ave. 
On leaving Mrs. Rosengarten's, return on Chestnut 
Hill Ave. to Seminole Ave., on which turn right and 
at traffic light bear right on St. Martins Lane to 
residence of: 

Mr. & Mrs. Frederick W. G. Peck 

8420 St. Martins Lane 
Leaving Mr. and Mrs. Peck's garden, turn right on 
St. Martins Lane and immediately left on Gravers 
Lane, proceeding to first cross street, turn right on 
Seminole Ave. to residence of: 

Mr. & Mrs. Horace C. Jones 

8305 Seminole Ave. 
Leaving Mr. and Mrs. Jones' garden return to Gravers 
Lane, turn left and then left again on St. Martins 
Lane. Continue to dead end, right on Mermaid Lane 
to dead end. Turn left on McCallum Street. Immed- 
iately after crossing McCallum St. bridge turn left on 
Elbow Lane to 7315. the garden of: 

Mr. & Mrs. J. Aubrey McCurdy 

7315 Elbow Lane 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

Your membership card is your ticket of admission 
to each garden. Members may bring guests upon pay- 
ment of $1.00 per guest. Guest tickets are available at 
any of the gardens or. in advance, from the office and 
will admit guests to all the gardens open for the day. 
Family groups w^ill be admitted upon presentation of 
a Family, Contributing or Sustaining Membership 
Card. 

Members are requested not to arrive at any gar- 
den before the scheduled opening hour and to leave 
promptly at closing time. Gardens open irrespective of 
weather. 

See back page for Bus information. 



GARDEN CLINICS 

There still may be time to register for the follow- 
ing May garden clinics if you have not already done 
so (See last month's NEWS for details.) : 
Techniques of Flower Bed Management, Thursday, 
May 2, 1 :30 P.M., Martha Ludes Garra, Instructor, 
at Valley Gardens, Chestnut Hill. Fee: $2.50. 
Use of Color in the Garden, Tuesday, May 14, 1 :30 
P.M., Martha Ludes Garra, Instructor, at 389 Sub- 
urban Station Building. Fee $2.00. 
Swarthmore's Plant Treasures, Thursday, May 23, 
1:30 P.M.; meeting at the Scott Memorial Building 
near the outdoor auditorium on the Swarthmore 
campus. Fee: $2.00. 

CLINICS FOR JUNE 

Chrysanthemums to Show, Tuesday, June 4, 1 :30 
P.M., Ernesta Drinker Ballard, Instructor, Valley 
Gardens, Chestnut Hill. Fee: $3.00 including plant. 

How to grow the small flowered chrysanthemums 
as modified cascades suitable for home decoration, 
and as bonsai, is the subject of this clinic. Each par- 
ticipant will receive a potted plant to grow and train 
as a cascade or bonsai. Additional plants will be 
available at $.75 each. 

Also included will be informtion on growing 
chrysanthemums in pots, conforming to the chrysan- 
themum show schedule, and some instruction will be 
given on the growing of exhibition size blooms and 
the culture of garden varieties. 

Color Photography for Gardeners, Saturday, June 15, 
10:30 .\.M.. Morris Arboretum, Chestnut Hill. En- 
rollment limited to 25 members. Fee : $7.50. 

An all day session conducted by Mary Alice 
Roche, a well-known horticultural photographer, is 
planned to help those who wish to improve the artistic 
quality of their pictures. Special emphasis will be 
placed on basic composition. Also included will be 
suggestions for selecting subject matter and for edit- 
ing collections for public and/or private showing. 

In the morning session Mrs. Roche will show 
slides and discuss the art of horticultural photography. 
After lunch, the group will be conducted on a picture 
taking walk. Please bring your camera and lunch. 

Registration coupon for Clinics: page 4. 



Special Lectures at Phila. Museum of Art 

May 7 VISIONS AND THE GARDEN 

Carlton B. Lees, Pa. Hort. Soc. 
FLOWER PAINTING THROUGH 
THE AGES 

Hobson Pittman, Pa. Acad, Fine .'\rts 
THE GARDEN IN HISTORY 

Dr. George B. Tatum, Univ. of Pa. 
CHINESE FLOWER PAINTING 

Dr. Hui-Lin Li, Univ. of Pa. 
DESIGN & FLOWER ARRANGEMENT 

Elizabeth R. Reynolds 
lectures are free (except May 1-1 — $1.50) 



May 14 

May 21 
May 28 
June 4 



All 
2:00 P.M., Van Pelt Auditorium. 



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Register by using the clip-out coupon. Please enclose check and 
mail to 389 Suburban Station, Phila. 3. Registrations accepted in the 
order received; confirmation by return post card. 



1 



GARDEN CLINIC REGISTRATION 

Please accept my reservation for: 

n TECHNIQUES OF FLOWER BED 
MANAGEMENT 
($2.50) 
May 2 1:30 P.M. Chestnut Hill 



D COLOR IN THE GARDEN 
($2.00) 
May 14 1:30 P.M. 



Society Rooms 



n SWARTHMORE'S PLANT TREASURES 
($2.00) 
May 23 1:30 P.M. Swarthmore Campus 

D CHRYSANTHEMUMS TO SHOW 
($3.00) 
June 4 1:30 P.M. Chestnut Hill 

D COLOR PHOTOGRAPHY FOR GARDENERS 
($7.50) 
June 15 10:30 A.M. Morris Arboretum 



Name 

Street 

City 

Telephone 



DATES To Mark On Your CALENDAR 

APRIL 30 DAFFODIL JUDGING SCHOOL 

MAY 2 GARDEN CLINIC: 1 :30 P.M. 

FLOWER BED PREPARATION, PLANTING 
MAY 6-10 ANNUAL MEETING, GARDEN CLUB OF AMERICA 
MAY 12 GARDEN VISITS 2:00-5:00 P.M. 

MAY 14 GARDEN CLINIC: 1 :30 P.M. 

COLOR IN GARDEN DESIGN 

MAY 23 GARDEN CLINIC: 1 :30 P.M. 

SWARTHMORE'S PLANT TREASURES 

MAY 25 DELAWARE VALLEY IRIS SHOW 

JUNE 2 GARDEN VISITS 2:00- 5 00 P.M. 

WILMINGTON - MEDIA 
JUNE 4 GARDEN CLINIC: 1 :30 P.M. 

CHRYSANTHEMUMS TO SHOW 

JUNE 15 GARDEN CLINIC: 10:30 A.M. 

COLOR PHOTOGRAPHY FOR GARDENERS 



Bus reservation for Chestnut Hill - Whitemarsh 

A bus will leave Pennsylvania Blvd., in front of Suburban Station 
Building at 1 :00 P.M., Sunday, May 12 for members of the Society 
and their guests. All reservations ($1.50 per person) must reach 
the Society office by Wednesday, May 8. 

BUS RESERVATION 

GARDEN VISITS 

Chestnut Hill - Whitemarsh 

Sunday, May 12, 1963 

Application with payment fSl.fiO) must reach the 
Pennsylvania Horticultural Society, 389 Suburban Station 
Building. Philadelphia 3. by Wednesday, May 8. 



Naine 



Address 



Clip this corner and mail 



^V THE Pennsylvania! 

^^r^m HORTICULTURAL 


1^^^ 


VOL IV N 


o. 


6 JUNE, 1963 


^ 


1 


1 


ews 


1617 PENNSYLVANIA BOULEVARD 
PHILADELPHIA 3. PENNSYLVANIA 






tr 





LILIES ARE SPECTACULAR 



Garden lilies rate top billing among herbaceous 
flowering plants not only for the spectacle they 
create, but because of the great many forms, sizes, 
growth habits, range of clear colors, and their year 
in, year out dependability. And as if this were not 
enough, lilies are useful in many ways. There are 
lilies with small flowers which are suitable for rock 
gardens ; several have pagoda-like whorls of leaves 
and small flowers of pastel hues which are at home 
in a woodland. There are the tall and stately trumpet- 
flowered lilies, eye-catching when staged in front of 
evergreens. There are lilies for moist and dry situa- 
tions, lilies for sun and for shade, lilies with fragrance 
and lilies with none. In short, there is a lily for 
nearly every situation in your garden. 

The majority of the eighty-odd species are hardy 
throughout the U. S. and only a few offer difficulty 
of culture. Most frequently seen are : the Tiger lily 
{Limmium tigrinum), the Madonna lily {L. candidum) , 
the Regal lily {L. regale) and the Show lily (L. specie- 
sum). Within these four most common species we 
have four completely distinct types of plant and 
flower, and four different colors. If we add the 
Easter Lily (L. longiflorum) we have still another 
type, and if we include the hybrid lilies there is no 
end to the description of forms. 

MARTAGON HYBRIDS 

This is one of the oldest of the hybrid groups 
and contains lilies of extreme longevity. The small 
flowers in maroon shades and in whites, yellows or 
pinks of pastel hue, are borne in racemes above the 
foliage. The plants are robust and stately ; the leaves 
are whorled about the stem. They perform best in 
filtered shade and a woodland soil with adequate 
moisture, and in the proper location they will increase 
each year with individual clumps persisting for more 
than thirty-five years. All the cultivars available are 
derived from original crosses between forms of 
L. martagon and L. hansonii. Examples: Mrs. R. O. 
Backhouse, Brocade, Paisley Hybrids. 

ASIATIC HYBRIDS 

Another old group which contains many cultivars 
of easy culture. In contrast to the Martagon group, 
these cultivars are generally brightly colored : red, 
orange-red. yellow and orange. Recently pinks and 
whites have been introduced through hybridization 
with L. cernuum. The flowers vary in form from hang- 



ing types with reflexed tepals (sepals and petals) to 
outward-facing types and upright cup-shaped types. 
Generally the flowers are spotted with dark maroon, 
but spotless forms are becoming available. The leaves 
are more or less grass-like and scattered on the stem. 
This group prefers full sun for best color and optimum 
bloom. Examples : Enchantment, Destiny and other 
Mid-century Hybrids, Mega, Mountaineer, Fiesta 
Hybrids, Harlequin Hybrids. 

TRUMPET HYBRIDS 

This group has risen steadily in popularity over 
the last two decades. It contains stately lilies most 
of which are tall-stemmed with a large inflorescence 
of trumpet-shaped flowers borne at a height of five 
to ten feet. Their colors range from deep rose through 
light pink, yellow and apricot. A number are pre- 
dominantly white with blushes of green, red or yellow. 

Besides the trumpet-shaped flowers, there are a 
number of different forms such as the Sunburst type 
with wide, flaring tepals ; the Bowl-shaped types with 
nodding cup-shaped flowers ; and the Aurelian types 
with hanging flowers and slightly reflexed tepals. 

Hybrids of this group are derived from crosses 
of hybrids among trumpet-flowered species with 
L. henryi an orange species similar to L. speciosum. 
In general, their culture is not difficult and they 
increase rapidly. Examples : Limelight, Black Dragon, 
Green Dragon, Shelburne Hybrids, African Queen, 
Life, and the Sunburst types. 

ORIENTAL HYBRIDS 

The newest of the more important hybrid groups, 
it contains some of the most strikingly beautiful lilies 
available. Here the largest flowers of the genus are 
found, some up to 18 inches across the face. The 
original cross, L. X parkmannii, was made in the last 
century between L. auratum and L. speciosum, but, 
unfortunately, was lost to cultivation. Recently, the 
cross has been repeated many times and has given 
rise to a number of superior forms. In addition, the 
hybrids and the parental species have been hybridized 
with L. japonicum and L. rubellum, two Japanese 
species with small pink trumpet-shaped flowers. These 
four species have produced a multitude of colors and 
forms which are now becoming available commercially. 
The colors are mainly pinks and magentas, but a 

(Cont'd page 2) 



JUNE REMINDERS 




DISBUDDING ROSES 

It is amazing how many gardeners who grow 
roses do not disbud to get large long-stemmed flowers. 
It takes little time and energy to pinch off side buds 
while they are very tiny and it is certainly worth the 
reward: prize-winning sized flowers. 




old flower 
and developing 
seed pods 

Remove old flower heads from lilacs wherever 
possible. They look much better if not allowed to 
develop seed. 



LILIES ARE SPECTACULAR-(Cont'd) 

number of cultivars have bands of gold down the 
center of each tepal. The flowers are generally borne 
facing outward or slightly nodding, and may be 
funnel-shaped or flat-faced. Some are spotted, some 
are not; some are solid pink, others are flushed with 
color. The variation within this group is just begin- 
ning to be exploited. Examples: Jillian Wallace, 
Jamboree, Allegra and other Potomac Hybrids. 

CULTURE 

The culture of lilies is really not so difficult as 
their great beauty would have us suppose. The major 
requirement is perfect drainage. Lilies cannot, at any 
time, stand in water. 

There are three diseases of importance in the 
Delaware Valley area. Hybrids resistant to all of 
them may be available before too many years, but 
even now the control is rather easy. Botrytis, which 
causes a black spotting on the leaves, may be con- 
trolled by Bordeaux Mixture. Fusarium, a rot of the 
bulb, is of little consequence if clean, firm bulbs are 
planted in well-drained soil. The virus diseases are 
impossible to eliminate, but they can be controlled 
by eliminating their vector, the aphid. Systemic in- 
secticides promise complete control of virus through 
control of the carrier. 

For those wishing to see lilies in the Pennsyl- 
vania area, there are, unfortunately, few public places 
that feature them. The National Arboretum, outside 
Washington, D. C, has established extensive lily 
plantings for the annual show of the North American 
Lily Society, to be held there on June 29th and 30th 
of this year. Longwood Gardens, near Kennett Square, 
Pennsylvania, exhibits a number of cultivars and 
species of lilies both in the conservatories and on 
the grounds. 



PRUNING HYDRANGEAS 

An excellent example of the importance of the 
relationship between growth and pruning exists in 
the common blue hydrangea {H. macrophylla), which 
is seen in particularly large numbers along the 
shores of New Jersey. One of the very frequent 
questions which arrives in the Society's office via 
telephone and mail has to do with the failure of these 
plants to bloom. When such is the case, the fact 
usually is revealed that they have been pruned at 
the wrong time. 

Because flower buds are formed at the ends of 
the long whip-like branches in late summer, if these 
hydrangeas are pruned in fall, winter or spring, the 
flower buds are removed. Old whips should be cut 
back to a strong side shoot immediately after flower- 
ing. If plants are old and particularly dense, remove 
the older whips at the ground line to allow room for 
the development of new ones. If hydrangeas are not 
pruned at all, they usually continue to bloom although 
the plants become unkempt and flower clusters 
diminish in size. 



1964 FLOWER SHOW 
HORTICULTURAL CLASSES 

March 8-14, 1964 

SUNDAY 
Class 

600 LARGE CUP NARCISSUS (Division II a), Carlton, 
forced and shown in an 8-inch bulb pan. 

601 TAZETTA NARCISSUS (Division VIII), Scarlet Gem, 
forced and shown in an 8-inch bulb pan. 

602 HYACINTH, Edelweiss, forced and shown in an 8- 
inch bulb pan. 

603 WINDOW SILL COLLECTION, a group of indoor 
plants suitable for a window garden, grown and shown 
by one to three exhibitors. Space to be filled 3 feet 8 
inches wide, 10 inches deep, and 4 feet high. Exhibitor 
may use plant tray or box. Limited to six entries. 

604 BONSAI, medium sized, vertical dimension including 
container, over 6 inches but not exceeding 15 inches. 

605 ESPALIER, a pot grown plant, trained on a portable 
frame or trellis, dimensions including container not to 
exceed 3 feet in width or 4 feet in height. 

606 HANGING BASKET, container 6 inches or less with 
foliage or flowering plant(s). 

607 SPECIMEN CATTLEYA ORCHID. 

608 SPECIMEN FERN, tropical or subtropical species, 
container 8 inches or less if pot grown, not to exceed 
12 inches in width if grown on bark or wood. 

609 ORCHIDS, a collection of 3 or more species of flowering 
plants artistically displayed in an area 3 feet by 4 feet. 

WEDNESDAY 
Class 

700 LARGE CUP NARCISSUS (Division II b), Fermoy, 
forced and shown in an 8-inch bulb pan. 

701 CYCLAMINEUS NARCISSUS (Division VI a), Feb- 
ruary Gold, forced and shown in an 8-inch bulb pan. 

702 HYACINTH, Delft Blue, forced and shown in an 8- 
inch bulb pan. 

703 TULIP.\ KAUFMANNIANA, any variety, forced and 
shown in a 6-inch bulb pan. 

704 BONSAX, large plants over 15 inches high including 
container. 

705 TOPIARY SPECIMEN, trained in any form, not to 
exceed 3 feet in width. 

706 H.^NGING BASKET with flowering plant(s), container 
12 inches or less. 

707 SPECIMEN AZ.\LEA, any variety forced into bloom, 
pot size not to exceed 12 inches. 

708 FLOWERING PLANT suitable for indoor culture in 
container 8 inches or less. 

709 MINIATURE ORCHID, total height of plant and con- 
tainer 6 inches or less excluding inflorescence. 

710 ORCHIDS, a collection of flowering plants artistically 
displayed in an area 3 feet by 4 feet. 

FRIDAY 
Class 

800 LARGE CUP NARCISSUS (Division II b), Daisy 
SchafTer. forced and shown in an 8-inch bulb pan. 

801 JONQUILLA HYBRID (Division VII b), Trevithian, 
forced and shown in a 6-inch bulb pan. 

802 HYACINTH, Flushing, forced and shown in an 8-inch 
bulb pan. 

803 GRAPE HYACINTH, Muscari botryoides album, forced 
and shown in a 6-inch bulb pan. 

804 ST.\NDARD, a woody plant trained as a standard. 

805 H.\NGING BASKET, with foliage plant(s), container 
12 inches or less. 

806 SPECIMEN BEGONIA, fibrous-rooted, in container 
6 inches or less. 

807 SPECIMEN BEGONIA, rhizomatous, in container 
8 inches or less. 

808 MINIATURE LANDSCAPE containing three or more 
plant species, largest dimension not to exceed 2}/2 feet. 

809 PLANT(S) FOR TERRACE DECORATION, one or 
more plants in a single container not to exceed 3 feet 
in any dimension. Must be assembled at least one week 
before the show, and to be judged for suitability and 
decorative effect. 

810 ORCHIDS, a collection of miniatures including three 
or more species artistically displayed in an area 3 feet 
by 3 feet. 



GARDEN VISITS, JUNE 2, 1963 
2:00 - 5:00 P. M. 

Starting- at Intersection of Routes 202 and 52 in 
Wilmington, Delaware, proceed 0.5 miles northwest 
on Rte. 52 (Delaware St.). Bear right on Delaware 
St., proceed 0.8 mi. Turn right on Grant Ave. to 
residence of: 

1. Mr. and Mrs. Edmond duPont 

2601 Grant Ave. 

Leaving Mr. and iVIrs. duPont's. return to Dela- 
ware Ave., turn right, proceed one block and turn 
left on Bancroft Parkway, then proceed 2.2 mi. to 
Pennsylvania Ave., Rte. 52 (Kennett Pike). Turn 
right, proceed 1.3 mi. to Berkley Rd., turn left and 
proceed to residence of: 

2. Mr. and Mrs. John M. Clark 

1003 Berkley Rd. 

Leaving Mr. and Mrs. Clark's residence, return 
to Rte. 52 (Kennett Pike) turn left and proceed to 
Hillside Road. Turn left on to Hillside Rd. and pro- 
ceed to dead end. Turn left on Centreville Rd. to 
residence of: 

3. Mr. and Mrs. William A. Worth 

"Scarlet Oaks" 

Leaving Mr. and Mrs. Worth's residence, return 
via Hillside Road to Kennett Pike, turn right and 
first left on Buck Road. At Montchanin Road, turn 
left and proceed to first drive on left, residence of: 

4. Mr. and Mrs. Donald P. Ross 



GARDEN CLINICS - JUNE '63 

Chrysanthemums to Show. Members interested in 
learning how to grow chrysanthemums for exhibition 
and garden decoration will be taught the techniques 
of growing and training potted plants. Ernesta 
Drinker Ballard will conduct the course and empha- 
size the growing of cascade and bonsai chrysanthe- 
mums for the fall show. Each participant will be given 
a plant to train. A follow-up session will be held, at 
the convenience of participants, in late summer for 
final appraisal and instruction. Tuesday, June 4, 1 :30 
P. M., Valley Gardens, Chestnut Hill. Fee, including 
plant, $3.00. Limited to 20 members. 

Color Photography for Gardeners. The renowned 
horticultural photographer, Mary Alice Roche, will 
hold a full day clinic for our members at the Morris 
Arboretum. The morning will be spent in a discussion 
and lecture session; the afternoon will be a field trip 
of picture-taking throughout the Arboretum's grounds. 
Saturday, June 15, 10:30 A.M., Morris Arboretum, 
Chestnut Hill. Fee, $7.50. Limited to 25 members. 
Please bring camera and lunch. 

Registration coupon for clinics on page 4. 



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RECENT GIFTS TO THE LIBRARY 

Mexican Flowering Trees and Plants, by Helen 
O'Gorman, Mexico City, Ammex Associados, 
1961. 218 pages. 

Presented by Henry Clifford, Radnor. 

Fifty Blooming Years, 1913-1963, by Marjorie Battles 
and Catherine Colt Dickey, The Garden Club of 
America, 1963. 98 pages. 

Presented by Mrs. Charles Piatt, Chestnut Hill. 

Katsura, Tradition and Creation in Japanese Archi- 
tecture, by Walter Gropius, Kenzo Tange and 
Yasuhiro Ishmoto, Yale University Press, New 
Haven, 1960. 36 pages. 

Presented by R. Gwynne Stout, Ardmore. 



Bus reservation for Wilmington, Delaware 

A bus will leave Pennsylvania Blvd., in front of Suburban Station 
Building at 12 Noon, Sunday, June 2 for members of the Society 
and their guests. All reservations ($1.50 per person) must reach 
the Society office by Wednesday, May 29. 



BUS RESERVATION 

GARDEN VISITS 
Wilmington, Delaware 
Sunday, June 2, 1963 

Application with payment (SI. SO) must reach the 
Pennsylvania Horticultural Society, 389 Suburban Station 
Building, Philadelphia 3, by Wednesday, May 29. 



Name 



Address 



Clip this corner and mail 



DATES To Mark On Your CALENDAR 

JUNE 2 GARDEN VISITS 2:00- 5 :00 P.M. 

WILMINGTON - MEDIA 

JUNE 4 GARDEN CLINIC: 1 :30 P.M. 

CHRYSANTHEMUMS TO SHOW 

JUNE 15 GARDEN CLINIC: 10:30 A.M. 

COLOR PHOTOGRAPHY FOR GARDENERS 



r 



BONSAI IN THE PARK 

The newly formed Pennsylvania Bonsai So- 
ciety will stage its first exhibition in the Japanese 
Garden, Fairmount Park, Saturday, June 29, 
10:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.AI. Bonsai enthusiasts who 
would like to exhibit their own plants are re- 
quested to contact Miss Urian, The Pennsylvania 
Horticultural Society, LO 3-8352. 



GARDEN CLINIC REGISTRATION 

Please accept my reservation for: 

D CHRYSANTHEMUMS TO SHOW 
(53.00) 



June 4 



1:30 P.M. 



Chestnut Hill 



D COLOR PHOTOGRAPHY FOR GARDENERS 
($7.50) 
June 15 10:30 A.M. Morris Arboretum 



Name 
Street 
City .... 



Telephone 



Please enclose check and mail to 389 Suburban Station, Phila. 3. 
Registrations accepted in the order received; confirmation by return 
post card. 



» 



E PENNSYLVANIA 
HORTICULTURAL 



SOCIE 



1617 PENNSYLVANIA BOULEVARD 
PHILADELPHIA 3. PENNSYLVANIA 




VOL. IV, No. 7 



JULY- AUGUST, 1963 



PESTICIDES ARE USUALLY NEEDED TO GROW CLEAN PLANTS 



When it comes to protecting lawns, trees and 
shrubs from pests, an ounce of prevention is worth a 
pound of cure. The problem, however, is an ounce 
of what prevention. With more than 9000 pesticides 
on the market, confusion seems inevitable. Actually, 
a basic understanding of some of the dilTerent kinds 
of pests and their control makes selection quite easy. 

The most readily identifiable pests are the chew- 
ing insects such as caterpillars and beetles. They 
chew holes in leaves and eat away the leaf margins. 
They can be poisoned by spraying or dusting a toxic 
substance on the foliage on which they feed. 

Borers are also chewers, but they attack bark 
rather than leaves. Because they bore into the bark, 
they are seldom noticed until damage is done. 

The next large group are the sucking insects ; 
aphids, mealybugs, scale, thrips, leaf-miners, lace- 
bugs, etc. They suck plant juices from inside leaves 
and stems and thus are not affected by any toxic 
material on the exterior surface. The way to kill 
them is to spray both the insects and their eggs with 
one of the substances that kill on contact, known 
appropriately as contact insecticides. 

A fourth group are mites. Their feeding habits 
are al^out the same as sucking insects, but mites are 
spiders, not insects, and they must therefore be 
attacked with miticides. 

Finally, plants fall prey to diseases bearing such 
descriptive names as blotch, canker, blister, spot, 
mold, rot, rust and wilt. Most are caused by invisible 
fungi and can be controlled by fungicides. Others 
are caused by bacteria and viruses and virtually defy 
control or cure. 

Trees and shrubs that are weak from lack of 
moisture or nourishment, especially when newly 
transplanted, are attractive and susceptible to borers, 
aphids, caterpillars, and mites. Injuries and open 
cuts are incentives for other insects and diseases. 
The first ounce of prevention with trees and shrubs 
is to keep them clean, healthy, well fed and watered, 
thus avoiding the necessity for using a pesticide. 

Unfortunately, there are some garden plants 
which fall prey to insects or diseases no matter how 
clean, healthy, well fed and well watered they may be. 
Roses, fruit trees, iris, columbine, azaleas and many 
vegetables are some examples. For such plants, the 



most practical solution is the use of "all purpose" or 
"complete" sprays. These are combinations of in- 
secticides, miticides and fungicides, and provide ex- 
cellent control when used at regular intervals as 
directed. There are many such sprays available, and 
a well stocked tool shed should include : 

1. A "complete" fruit tree spray. (This can also 
be used on shade trees and shrubs, if needed.) Buy 
it fresh in March and follow directions. 

2. A "complete" floral dust or spray. These 
are often labeled as rose sprays, but are usually 
designed for all kinds of plants. Rose spraying should 
start in April. 

3. A vegetable dust or spray if you are growing 
edibles. 

4. Soil insect controls containing chlordane, 
dieldrin or heptachlor in various forms which should 
be used to avoid great damage, if this type of pest 
is particularly troublesome. 

5. A dormant spray of miscible oil such as 
Scalecide which, when used during winter and just 
before leaves arrive, will give a head start against 
mites and scale insects and also control many species 
of aphids by destroying their eggs. The dormant 
sprays are used on woody species especially prone to 
attack by these pests. 

6. Borer controls. Particularly susceptible to 
borers are : peach trees, dogwoods, maples, lilac and 
rhododendron. Borer activity is greatest during spring 
and fall. When you see evidence of borers apply 
Parascalecide, Borgo, Borer-Pruf, Borekil or a similar 
product sold specifically for the purpose. The im- 
portant thing is to begin using a control at the first 
appearance of borer holes in the bark. 

No matter how careful your culture, how com- 
plete your spraying program and how religiously you 
follow it, problems will arise that will call for more 
specific treatment. A difficult question for the 
gardener is which chemical will best serve his needs. 

Despite occasional reports that pests art becom- 
ing immune to the older insecticides, DDT and Lin- 
dane are still eflfective and much in use for chewing 
insects and borers. Malathion covers a broader range 
of insect species and is deservedly popular. Sevin 

(Cont'd on page 2) 



"After many long docile years of following 
all the advice given me by professional gardeners 
and by the authoritative authors of gardening 
books, ! have turned insubordinate. I have 
discovered for myself that it sometimes pays to 
treat plants rough; to go against the rules and 
get a surprising reward." 

V. Sackviile-West 



PESTICIDES-(Cont'd from page 1) 

has emerged as the first really good Japanese beetle 
control and is also one of the safest. Kelthane stands 
out as a formidable miticide. New fungicide combina- 
tions provide good control of many plant diseases. 

To be fully effective, pest control substances 
must be applied to the upper and lower surfaces of 
all leaves as well as the bark. It is important to get 
the nozzle or applicator inside the foliage to insure 
full coverage. 

Spray equipment is as much a part of the program 
as the material to be sprayed. A small hand sprayer, 
a hose-end sprayer and a compression sprayer are 
basic and adequate for most gardeners. Sprayers must 
be thoroughly cleaned after each use. Be especially 
thorough before storing after the season, or openings 
will corrode and clog. 

Most pesticides are reasonably stable by them- 
selves but begin to lose potency when combined or 
mixed with water. Do not buy more spray material 
than can be used in a season or mix more than can 
be used in a day or so. 

Most pesticides are lethal and should be used 
with caution. Unfortunately, it is not compulsory for 
pesticide manufacturers to label their containers with 
the pharmaceutical scull and crossbones — the familiar 
poison signal. However, the label will warn of the 
presence of dangerous material even though in fine 
print. Therefore, before applying any material, read 
the list of contents and the directions carefully. 

The need for caution is especially applicable to 
systemic insecticides which have now become gener- 
ally available. These work by distributing the poison 
through the leaves and other tissues of the treated 
plant so that both chewing and sucking insects and 
mites die when they feed. Systemic materials are 
highly dangerous and should be handled only by 
experienced gardeners. They can cause death by 
contact and by inhalation, as well as by internal 
consumption. They should not be left exposed on 
the surface of the soil around plants where children 
and animals can come in contact with them. Under 
no circumstances should they be used in the vegetable 
garden or near any food plants. 



SUMMER CARE FOR INDOOR PLANTS 

A high TH index may be unpleasant for people 
but it is ideal for tropical and sub-tropical plants. Most 
grow best during these warm, humid summer weeks, 
and this is the time to produce specimen plants for 
winter enjoyment. There are a few rules to 
remember: 

1. Move as many plants as possible outside. 
Plants described as shade plants (usually those native 
to tropical rain forests) should be put in the filtered 
light found under tall shrubs or trees. Those which 
grow naturally in the full exposure of the southern 
sun should be put in open spots on the terrace or in 
garden beds. In spring and summer, even shady 
places outside have a much higher light intensity 
than any indoor location. This relatively intense light 
coming from all sides and overhead produces a more 
symmetrical specimen. 

2. Water all potted plants daily — or more often 
if it is necessary. A potted plant should never be 
allowed to dry out completely. (The only exceptions 
are succulent desert plants.) Watering with a hose 
is the most effective method. If a flaring rose nozzle 
is used, the water will be delivered in a gentle shower, 
and foliage will be washed clean of dust and insects. 

3. Use fertilizer regularly. Potted plants which 
are growing vigorously need quick-acting, water 
soluble chemical fertilizers. Use a formula recom- 
mended for potted plants and follow the manufacturer's 
directions. Pinch new growth on woody plants several 
times during the summer to produce as many branches 
as possible. Certain soft-stemmed herbaceous plants 
also respond well to pinching. 

4. Avoid a pot-bound condition. The remedies 
are larger pots or root pruning. If the plants are 
summered under trees or shrubs, lift or turn them 
frequently to cut off the roots which will grow down 
through the drainage hole in the pot. (This condition 
does not necessarily indicate a pot-bound condition. 
Roots always grow down.) 

5. Watch out for pests. Usually, they are not 
nearly as troublesome outside in summer as they are 
inside in winter. Natural enemies keep them fairly 
well controlled. Slugs sometimes do great damage to 
shade loving tropicals summering in sunken beds. A 
metaldehyde bait is the only control. This has to be 
applied to the ground around the plants frequently. 
It has no residual effect and is washed away by hosing 
and rain. 

6. Make cuttings of soft-stemmed species — 
geraniums, begonias, coleus, impatiens and others — 
for next winter's plants. 



Garden Tip 



from 



Mrs. H. Rowland Timms 

Order daffodils now. 

They need to be planted much earlier 

than many other bulbs. 



. . . From the President 

On May 9 the Society was awarded The Garden 
Club of America Aledal of Honor for service in 
horticulture. The presentation was made at the 50th 
Annual Meeting of the Garden Club of America at 
the Philadelphia Museum of Art. The citation reads 
as follows : 



"The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society, now in its one 
hundred and thirty-si.xth year of dedication to the Horticultural 
Arts, has a continued program which differs little from the 
original goals and activities of the founding members. The 
idea of display gardens, libraries, flower shows, awards, publi- 
cations ,and public information appeared vital in 1827 and 
remains vital today. 

"The Society's educational projects are varied and many — 
including the encouragement of plant introductions by the 
display of new species and varieties; by providing classes in 
practical instruction in horticulture and flower arrangement; 
by garden tours, garden clinics, and special exhibitions; by 
providing a Speakers Bureau and consultations of all kinds. 

"The influence of this Society extends far beyond its 
regional limits, and the Society has the respect of horticultur- 
ists, laymen, and its Sister Societies throughout the world. 

"It is, therefore, with a special delight and pride that 
the Garden Club of .America presents its highest Horticultural 
Award — The Medal of Honor — for service in horticulture 
to the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society." 



I am also pleased to report that the Society has 
been made an Affiliate Member of the National 
Council of State Garden Clubs, Inc. We expect that 
many benefits will flow to both organizations from 
this new association. 

Mrs. William Howard Benson, President of the 
Garden Club Federation of Pennsylvania, has in- 
formed us that the Federation's Blue and Gold Award 
which was originally created for the Philadelphia 
Flower Show is now available for all shows sponsored 
by the Society. This award will be given next, if 
merited, to the best of the blue ribbon winners in 
the designated artistic classes at the fall Chrysanthe- 
mum Show. 

Mrs. Walter W. Pollock and Mr. William Weber 
were elected to the Council at its June meeting. 



R. Gwynne Stout 



PLEASE FILL OUT THE POSTCARD 

We are installing a mechanized file which will 
facilitate sorting out members who are interested 
in particular subjects. This will help us to plan 
programs, arrange activities and send you notices and 
information in your field of special interest. 

The file will accomplish its purpose only if all 
members specify at least a few fields of interest. 
Enclosed is a post paid card on which we hope you 
will indicate your preferences and suggestions. If 
there is not enough space on the card, WTite us a letter. 



GARDEN CLINIC FOR AUGUST 

A talk and guided tour of the John J. Tyler 
Arboretuin, Painter and Forge Roads, Lima, Middle- 
town Township, Delaware County, will be given by 
Mrs. John C. Wister on Saturday, August 10, with 
Saturday, August 17 as a rain date. 

The clinic presents a fine opportunity for members 
to study the splendid collections that make the 
arboretum unique. These include specimen trees 
planted by the Painter brothers between 1840 and 
1860, native wild flowers and ferns, rhododendrons 
and azaleas, cone-bearing trees, day-lilies, and a 
garden for the blind. 

Participants are invited to bring a picnic lunch. 
Maps showing the exact location will be mailed to 
all who register. 

FIELD TRIPS SCHEDULED FOR AUGUST 

The opportunity to visit two places of excep- 
tional horticultural interest becomes available to 
members in August. The first trip will be to the 
Experimental Farm of Amchem Products in Spring- 
house. A guided tour by members of the Amchem 
staff will be conducted over the various plots where 
herbicides are being tested. 

Members will meet at the farm at 6:15 P.M. on 
Tuesday evening, August 6. There will be no 
charge but those planning to attend are asked to fill 
out a reservation so that the Society will know how 
many to expect. To reach Amchem Farm, take Rt. 
309 extension to the Springhouse exit. Turn left on 
Norristown Rd. and proceed 34 mile to McKean 
Road. Turn right on McKean and proceed J4 mi. to 
Amchem Farm on your left. 

On Tuesday, August 27 . an excursion will be 
made to Burpee's Fordhook Farms in Doylestown 
where w-ell over a hundred varieties of flowers and 
vegetables are displayed in test plots and rows. A 
member of the Burpee staff will conduct the tour 
starting at 1 P. M. 

A chartered limousine will leave the Pennsylvania 
Boulevard Entrance of the Suburban Station Building 
at 12:00 P.M. (Expected return 5:00 P.M.) Fare 
$4.00. Members wishing to provide their own trans- 
portation will be sent a map showing the exact 
location of the Farms. There is no charge for the 
tour at Fordhook Farms, but a reservation is neces- 
sary. Limousine reservations must be made and paid 
for in advance. 



LIBRARY NOTES 

The Committee is pleased to report a gift from 
Mr. William Frederick, Jr., designated for rebinding 
the fine large volume Formal Gardens of England and 
Scotland by H. Inigo Triggs, published in London, 
1902. 

Exotica III is here at last. This colossal work is 
the accomplisment of Alfred Byrd Graf and is pub- 
lished by Roehrs and Co. Over 11,000 plants are 
pictured and described. The book weighs thirteen 

(Cont'd on Page 4) 



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CHRYSANTHEMUM SHOW SCHEDULES 

are available upon request to anyone interested 
in the 1963 Show, to be staged at the American 
Baptist Convention, King of Prussia Park, Valley 
Forge, on November 2-3. 



Register by using the clip-out coupon. Please enclose check and 
mail to 380 Suburban Station, Phila. 3. Registrations accepted in the 
order received: confirmation by return post card. 



REGISTRATION FORM 

Please register me for : 

□ AMCHEM FARM 

(no charge) 

August 6 6:15 P.M. Springhouse 

D TYLER ARBORETUM, 
DELAWARE COUNTY 

($2.00 per member) 

August 10 10:00 A.M. Lima 

D FORDHOOK FARMS 

(no charge) 

August 27 1 :00 P.M. Doylestown 

n LIMOUSINE FOR TRIP TO 
FORDHOOK FARMS 
(Leaves Suburban Station Bldg. at 12 Noon) 

($4.00) 

Name _ _ _ 

Address 

Telephone _ 



1 



DATES To Mark On Your CALENDAR 

AUGUST 6 (Tuesday) Springhouse, Pa. 6:15 P.M. 
TOUR OF AMCHEM FARM 

AUGUST 10 (Saturday) Delaware County 10:00 A.M. 

TYLER ARBORETUM QINIC 

AUGUST 27 (Tuesday) Doylestown, Pa. 1 :00 P.M. 

FORDHOOK FARMS EXCURSION 

LIBRARY NOTES— (Cont'd from Page 3) 

pounds. 

Mr. Sig Gorny has presented a four-volume set of 
Demonstrations Elementaires de Botanique, published at 
Lyon in 1796. 

Dekoratyuine Sodininkste (Ornamental Gardening) 
Valstybine Politines ir Mokslines Literaturos. Leidy- 
kla, 1963, a gift of the Academy of Natural Sciences 
of Philadelpia, has also been received. 

NEW BOOKS 

Andre Le Notre, Garden Architect to Kings, by Helen 

M. Fox, Crown, 1962, 176 pp. Illus. 

The Moutan or Tree Peony, by Michael Haworth- 
Booth, St. Martin's Press, 1963, 106 pp. Illus. 

Imaginative Small Gardens, by Nancy Grasby, 
Hearthside Press, 1963, 256 pp. Illus., diagrs. 

Shrubs and Trees for the Home Landscape, by James 
Bush-Brown. Chilton Books, 1963, 210 pp. Illus. 



This issue of the NEWS is for July and August; the 
September Issue will be mailed on or about August 20. 



THE PENNSVI.VAN 
HORTICULTURi 



SOCIE' 



1617 PENNSYLVANIA BOULEVARD 
PHILADELPHIA 3. PENNSYLVANIA 



VOL. IV. No. 8 



SEPTEMBER, 1963 




PLANT DAFFODILS NOW FOR SPRING DISPLAY 



I 



When your order of new daffodil bulbs arrives 
sometime in September, plant them immediately. If 
this is not possible, open the bags and keep the bulbs 
in a cool, dry place until you can get at them. Sep- 
tember or early October is the best time to plant in 
this part of the world. Late planted daffodils not only 
bloom later in the spring, but they do not have time 
to develop good root growth — the deeper the roots 
the finer the flower. 

One of the reasons the daffodil has become so 
popular is the ease of its culture. Good sound bulbs 
from a reputable dealer will give bloom the following 
spring in almost any soil, if it is well drained. A fine 
daffodil the first year is due to the producer. The 
flower is already formed in the bulb when you plant 
it. Sun and moisture do the rest. 

To produce good results after the first year, the 
daffodil needs favorable growing conditions. Prepare 
the soil well before planting. Dig in organic matter 
if needed — compost or peat moss. Add bone meal. 
Plant the bulbs with the tip four inches below the 
surface of the soil. In light soils, they can be planted 
deeper. There is a firm conviction among many 
growers that if bulbs are planted deep they do not 
multiply so quickly. 

Naturalizing daffodils is one of the finest ways 
to enjoy them. Put them in a meadow, a woodland, 
on grassy banks, near the roots of old lawn trees. 
Here where the grass does not have to be cut until 
the foliage has ripened, the flowers will thrive for 
many years with a minimum of care. Plant some of 
the old varieties like Mrs. Krelage, St. Egwin, Yellow 
Poppy, Trevithian and any of the poets and jonquils. 
These are more appropriate in such a setting than 
the large trumpets and brilliant cupped varieties so 
obviously man-made and better grown in rows for 
cutting and the show bench. The season for natural- 
ized varieties can begin with February Gold in March 
and continue right into the first week of May with 
the late poets. 

Every year one should buy a few new bulbs, 
no matter how many there may be in the garden. It 
adds immeasurably to the delights of spring to greet 
not only the old tried and true but a few exciting 
new individuals. Aircastle, the champion bloom at the 



R.H.S. Daffodil Show this year, is tempting. Expen- 
sive? Yes, but you can spend $3.00 on lots of things 
much less worth while than this. Try some of the 
increasingly popular small varieties. Fairy Circle, 
April Tears, Snipe, which may be planted on the 
terrace if you have no rock garden. No, these are not 
so dependable as Carlton and Unsurpassible, but 
nothing ventured, nothing gained. 

Dividing daffodils, which should be done every 
three to five years according to variety increase, is 
a job for the end of June or first part of July. Old 
Mr. Robinson of English garden fame said, "It is 
better to dig and replant daffodils too soon than too 
late," a wise maxim for those of us who procras- 
tinate. Some authorities say that bulbs should be 
kept out of the ground for several weeks in a cool 
dry place before replanting. In the Philadelphia area 
it is almost impossible to find a "cool, dry" place in 
July and August, and on the whole it is simpler for 
most of us to make one operation and replant the 
bulbs as we divide them. Careful inspection is im- 
portant. Any bulb injured in digging should be 
discarded. Any which are not absolutely sound should 
be destroyed. The very small ones, unless it be a rare 
variety you wish to propagate, are not worth keeping 
if you do not have a nursery or meadow where two 
or three years lack of bloom is not noticed. 

The reason for dividing and replanting daffodils 
early is obvious to anyone who has belatedly dug his 
own large clumps after mid-August. Unless there 
has been a prolonged drought, most varieties will be 
found with new roots developed by that time. In 
general, it is said trumpet daffodils have a longer 
dormancy than the poets and tazettas. A bulb is a 
living thing at all times and should be treated with 
care, even when dormant. 



"In rainy weather try to find something to do 
indoors. Clean up rather than be idle. Remennber 
that even though work stops, expenses run on none 
the less." 

Marcus Portius Cato (234-149 B.C.) 
On Agriculture 



TOPIC NUMBER ONE - THE WEATHER 



Golfers and gardeners are painfully aware of the 
distressing effects of the drought which has prevailed 
in the Delaware Valley since November 1962. In 
some parts of the area the deficit in rainfall is as 
high as 10 inches. This, following the third bad 
winter in succession, is playing havoc not only with 
lawns but with newly planted trees and shrubs, 
which need regular supplies of water for two or 
three years. Truck farmers have been hard hit, and 
locally grown strawberries, raspberries and other 
delicacies have been in very short supply. 

Plants use enormous c|uantities of water. Most 
of it moves through the plant tissues and is evapo- 
rated from the leaves into the atmosphere in the 
process known as transpiration. (Indoor gardeners 
know that the more plants they group together, the 
higher the relative humidity will be. This is the 
result of transpiration.) 

In summer, at the height of the growing season, 
6/^ tons of water will rise from an acre of field grass 
in one sunny day. A mature apple tree will transpire 
4 gallons in 24 hours. A single stalk of corn will lift 
440 lbs. of water in one growing season. These figures 
give an idea of how much water is needed to maintain 
the type of vegetation which residents of the Eastern 
seaboard expect. 

Good gardening practice includes the anticipa- 
tion of drought. The wise gardener prepares for this 
eventuality by holding as much moisture in the soil 
as possible. The best way to do this is to incorporate 
large amounts of organic matter into flower beds 
and shrub borders and into the soil used when plant- 
ing trees and shrubs. Sources of organic matter are 
crumbly compost, leaf mold, peat moss and well- 
rotted manure. 

Water enters the soil in the form of rain from 
above. In a normally heavy rain, about one third of 
the fall either runs oflf into streams or percolates 
deep into the earth below the roots of even the largest 
trees. In summer, another third is lost by surface 
evaporation. The last third penetrates to a depth 
where it can be used by plants. There, the water 
forms a film around the particles of sand and clay 
that make up soils. A sandy soil has less water 
holding capacity than clay because the sand particles 
are larger and have less total surface for water to 
cling to. Clay, on the other hand, leaches into tightly 
packed formations that resist penetration by water. 
The addition of organic matter to either clay or sand 
is like the addition of multitudes of tiny sponges 
which soak up and hold water for the plants' use. 

The purpose of hoeing and cultivating is not 
to make a garden look better, but to conserve water. 
Eradicating weeds eliminates one source of competi- 
tion for the availaljle water, and breaking the crust 
on the soil surface encourages water to enter rather 
than run off or evaporate. 



Mulching is another way to conserve water. A 
mulch keeps the soil temperature down and thus 
prevents surface evaporation. But be careful that the 
mulch doesn't work in reverse. Peat moss which is 
not well soaked can rob the soil of moisture, and 
if it is not mixed into the soil, it sometimes dries 
into a crust which sheds the rain and prevents it 
from entering the ground. 

If the water supply is short and a decision has 
to be made as to when and what to water, the follow- 
ing are a few tips to bear in mind : 

1. When dogwoods and hydrangeas wilt, it is 
time to get out the hose. Trees and shrubs that 
have been planted within the last two years should 
be watered first. The vegetable garden comes next. 
(Who likes stringy beans and pithy radishes?) Lawns, 
particularly those composed of bluegrasses and 
fescues can be perfectly brown and still recover. 

2. As to how much to water, the answer must 
be "it depends." In general, the hose should run 
slowly for at least an hour to do a proper job on a 
tree, shrub, border, herbaceous border or lawn. 
Soakers and root feeders get the water where it is 
most needed. 

3. Postpone transplanting and fertilizing until 
after a good soaking rain. 

Winter damage will be severe if we have a dry 
fall. If precipitation from now on is near normal, most 
permanent plantings in the area will probably recover. 



Total 

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The Kid-Fling houses on Walnut Street between 3rd and 4th Streets which are being reconstructed for the Society's use. 

Work began last nnonth with completion expected in June of 1964. 



GARDEN CLINICS 

In response to requests that the Clinics offer 
more detailed study of various phases of gardening, 
Martha Ludes Garra is presenting "The Garden Year" 
in three parts. I. Fall Chores in Preparation for 
Winter, II. Winter Planning on Paper, with one 
session on vegetable gardens and three on planning 
an herbaceous border (your own), and III. Spring 
Garden Work. A full description of what each of 
the later clinics will cover will be published in the 
NEWS the month before the clinic date. 

Clinics for September and October 

Tuesday, Sept. 24 1 :30 P. M. 

Forcing Bulbs for Show and Home 

The first fall clinic, Forcing Bulbs, will be held 
at the Fairmount Park Greenhouse. The course will 
cover the various bulb classes in the 1964 Philadel- 
phia* Flower Show schedule (see June NEWS) and 
is designed to help both exhibitors and those wishing 
to force bulbs for their own enjoyment. Each par- 
ticipant will be given a bulb pan, proper potting soil, 
and bull)s to plant. Mrs. H. Rowland Timms, past 
Regional Vice-President of the American Daffodil 
Society, will instruct the clinic. Fee : $4.00 

Thursday, Sept. 26, Tuesday, Oct. 8 1 :30 P. M. 

Indoor Gardening 

This series of two clinics, one to be held in the 
Society Rooms and the second in Mrs. Ballard's in- 
door garden, are planned to increase both knowledge 
and techniques. Selections and arrangement of 
plants, phytoillumination, and pest control will be 
covered. Fee : $4.00. Instructor : Ernesta D. Ballard. 



Tuesday, October 15 1:30 P.M. 

Growing Specimen Plants 

Horticultural Classes for the Philadelphia Flower 
Show (excluding bulbs) will cover the methods of 
training an espalier, a topiary, and a standard, the 
selection and planting of hanging basket plants, the 
assembling of a window sill collection, a miniature 
landscape, and a terrace container. The special bonsai 
and orchid classes will also be explained. The lecture 
and demonstration will be given in the Society 
Rooms. Ernesta D. Ballard and Nancy G. Urian, 
Instructors. Fee: $2.00. 

Tuesday, October 22 10:30 A. M. 

Fall Chores in Preparation for Winter 

The "how" and "why" of dividing perennials, 
planting bulbs, using cold frames, mulching, com- 
posting and dormant pruning — all tasks to insure a 
better garden next year — will be discussed and dem- 
onstrated at this clinic which will be held in the 
garden of the instructor, Martha L. Garra. Fee: $2.50. 

Registration coupon for clinics on page 6. 



MEMBERS' SHOW OF PLANT 
AND GARDEN SLIDES 

The first Members' Evening on Tuesday, Oc- 
tober 1, will be a special event for photographers. 
Many members take slides of the happenings in their 
gardens, the neighborhood, and on vacations and 
enjoy sharing their pictures with other garden en- 
thusiasts. We are inviting you to bring in five of 
your best horticultural slides. We will provide the 
projector and screen. If you plan to participate in 
this program, please contact the Society by telephone, 
LO 3-8352 or postcard. The program will begin at 
7:30 P.M.; the library will be open at 6:30. 



THE PENNSYLVANIA HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

1963-1964 SCHEDULE OF EVENTS 

(.Additional dates may be added as activities are scheduled. Details of all events will appear in the NEWS.) 



Septemlier 14-15 

w 24 
2 

•^ 26 



Main Line Flower Show - Conestoga High School 

Clinic: Forcing Bull)s for Show and Home 

Mrs. H. Rowland Tinims 

Clinic: Gardening Indoors (Part I) 

Ernesta D. Ballard 



1 :30 P.M. 
1 :30 P.M. 



October 



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8 

13 
15 



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FebruarA- 


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Members' Evening: Members' Show of Plant and Garden Slides 

Clinic: Gardening Indoors (Part II) 

Ernesta D. Ballard 

Garden Visits : Chester Springs, Pa. 

Clinic: Horticultural Classes (excluding bulbs) 

Philadelphia Flower Show Schedule 
Ernesta D. Ballard and Nancy G. Urian 
Fall Garden Day : Temple University Ambler Campus 
Dr. John M. Fogg, Jr. - Magnolias 
Richard Cripps - Landscape Design 
Dr. H. W. Rickett - Wildflowers 
Rex Murfitt - Alpines 
Clinic: The Garden Year (Part I) 
Martha L. Garra 

Eastern Pennsylvania Chrysanthemum Show - American Baptist 

Convention 
Members' Evening: Italian Gardens 
Frederick W. G. Peck, Landscape Architect 

Clinic: Home GroAvn Cut Flowers - Foliage for Indoor Decoration 
Ernesta D. Ballard 
Annual Meeting 

Members' Evening: Lilies 

Dr. Richard W. Eighty. Geneticist 

Clinic: Make Your Own Christmas Wreath 

Nancy G. Urian 

Christmas Show - Western Saving Fund 

Members' Evening: Gardening Indoors 

Ernesta D. Ballard 

Clinic : Botany for Gardeners 

Dr. John M. Fogg, Jr. 

Clinic: The Garden Year (Part II) 

Martha L. Garra 

Members' Evening: Gardening for Pleasure - Panel 

Martha L. Garra, Garden Consultant 

Mary Milton Martin, Horticulturist 

William H. White, Philadelphia County Agent 

Dr. John C. Swartley. Temple Faculty, Nurseryman 



7:30 P.M. 
1 :30 P.M. 

1:30-5:00 P.M. 
1 :30 P.M. 

10:00 A.M. 



10:30 A.M. 



7:30 P.M. 
7:45 P.M. 
3:30 P.M. 
7:30 P.M. 
1 :00 P.M. 

7:30 P.M. 
7:30 P.M. 
7:30 P.M. 

7:30 P.M. 



1963-1964 SCHEDULE OF EVENTS - Continued) 

6, 13, 27 Clinic: Planning the Herbaceous Border (Part I) 10:30 A.M. 

Martha L. Garra 

20 Clinic: A Nurseryman Talks about Landscaping 7:30 P.M. 
William H. Frederick, Jr. 

March 3 Members' Evening: Chrysanthemums in Japan 7:30 P.M. 

Cornelius Ackerson, Editor, National Chrysanthemum Society Bulletin 
Bulletin 

8-14 1964 Philadelphia Flower Show 

12 Spring Luncheon - Speaker to be announced 12:30 P.M. 

24 Clinic: The Garden Year (Part III) 10:30 A.M. 

Martha L. Garra 

31 Clinic: Roses (Part I) 7:30 P.M. 

Richard Thomson 

April 7 Members' Evenings: Books for Gardeners 7:30 P.M. 

Mrs. Ernest C. Drew, Gardener and Librarian 

9 Clinic: Rhododendrons and Azaleas 7:30 P.M. 

Mary Milton Martin 

21 Clinic: Bonsai 1:30 P.M. 
Ernesta D. Ballard 

24-25 Daffodil Show and Lectures 

Carlton B. Lees, Exec. Secy. Massachusetts Horticultural Society 
Anne Wertsner Wood, Author, Lecturer 

May 10 Garden Visits: Main Line Area 1:30-5:00 P.M. 

12 Field Trip: Henry Foundation for Botanical Research 3:00 P.M. 

Mrs. J. Norman Henry 

13-31 Opening Chelsea Show and Tour of English Gardens 

Martha L. Garra, Tour Guide 

26 Clinic : Training Chrysanthemums 1 :30 P.M. 

Ernesta D. Ballard and Nancy G. Urian 

June 4 Field Trip: Pine Barrens 10:00 A.M. 

Elizabeth M. Woodford 

20 Plant Exchange 

Clinic: Roses (Part II) 
Richard Thompson 

Clinic: Planning the Herbaceous Border (Part II) 
Martha L. Garra 

OFFICE STAFF 
Ernesta D. Ballard, Executive Secretary Sylvia Maggit+i, Secretarial Assistant 

Nancy S. Urian, Horticulturist Catherine E. Taggart, Membership Secretary 

Richard Presser, Librarian Florence Townsend, Bookkeeper (part-time) 

OFFICE TELEPHONE: LO 3-8352 
MAILING ADDRESS: 389 Suburban Station Building, Philadelphia. Pa. 19103 



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MAIN LINE FLOWER SHOW 

"The Earth's Message" is the theme of this year's 
Main Line Flower Show, to be held Saturday, Sep- 
tember 14 from 4 to 9 and Sunday, September 15, 
12 to 5, in the cafeteria of the Conestoga High School, 
Conestoga and Irish Road, Berwyn. Mrs. Frederick 
P. Ristine is the Show chairman. 

Under the chairmanship of Mrs. James C. Hornor, 
the Society's Exhiljits Committee will stage an educa- 
tional display of appropriate evergreens for the 
Delaware Valley. 



FALL GARDEN DAY PLANNED 

Five people well-known in the horticultural world 
will participate in the Society's third annual FALL 
GARDEN DAY to be held on Saturday, October 19 
at the Ambler Campus of Temple University. 

Mrs. Alfred Martin, Chairman of the event, has 
announced that the program will begin promptly at 
10 A.M. and close at 3:30. Details and registration 
blanks will be mailed to members early in September. 



Landscape Design School, Course III 

sponsored jointly by the Pennsylvania Horticul- 
tural Society and the Garden Club Federation of 
Pennsylvania, this comprehensive series should prove 
invaluable to all gardeners. The dates : October 14, 
15, and 16; the place: Strawbridge and Clothier Audi- 
torium. Programs and registration blanks are avail- 
able, just call the office - LO 3-8352. Details will 
appear next month. 



Anyone wishing advance information about 
the English Garden Tour scheduled tor May 13-31, 
1964, nnay call the Society office. The itinerary 
will appear in the October NEWS. 



HARVEST FAIR 

The Annual Harvest Fair, sponsored by the horti- 
culture and landscape alumnae will be held on the 
grounds of the Ambler Campus of Temple University 
on Saturday, September 28, from 10:00 A.M. until 
3:30 P.M. This is a fine opportunity to see the 
campus, its lovely perennial borders, the outstanding 
collection of trees and shrubs, and the facilities for 
horticulture and landscape design educations, 



Register by using the clip-out coupon. Please enclose check and 
mail to 389 Suburban Station, Phila. 3. Registrations accepted in the 
order received; confirmation by return post card. 



GARDEN CLINIC REGISTRATION 

Please register me for the following: 

□ Bulb Forcing 
($4.00 per member) 

Sept. 24 - 1 :30 P. M. Fairmount Park Green- 
houses 

□ Gardening Indoors 

($4.00 per member for series of two) 

Sept. 26 - 1 :30 P.M. Society Rooms 

Oct. 8 - 1 :30 P.M. Chestnut Hill 

□ Specimen Plants for Phila. Flower Show 

($2.00 per member) 
Oct. 15 - 1 :30 P. M. 

□ The Garden Year, Part I 

($2.50 per member) 
Oct. 22 - 10:30 A.M. 



Society Rooms 



Ambler 



Name 

Address 

I Telephone 



THE PENNSYLVANIA 



HORTICULTURAL 



SOCIETY 



".17 PENNSYLVANIA BOULEVARD 
(ILADELPHIA 3. PENNSYLVANIA 




VOL IV. No. 9 



OCTOBER, 1963 



SCIENCE ADVISORY COMMITTEE REPORT ON "THE USE OF PESTICIDES" 



The questions raised by Rachel Carson in "Silent 
Spring" prompted President Kennedy to refer the 
matter of pesticides to his Science Advisory Commit- 
tee, which in turn formed a panel consisting of six 
scientists specializing in biology, chemistry, botany 
and medicine, a conservationist, an agriculturist, and 
the dean of a college of arts and sciences. The Panel's 
report, released May 14, 1963, is an effort to weigh 
objectively and dispassionately the values of pesti- 
cides, the hazards involved in their use, and the 
government's procedures for minimizing these hazards. 
The recommendations for improvement show clearly 
that our regulatory procedures are in danger of being 
outstripped by the flood of new developments in the 
field. 

The report is non-technical and can be read with 
interest by lay people interested in horticulture. Here 
are some of the highlights : 

I. INTRODUCTION 

The intensified agriculture required to support 
the increasing human population encourages pests. 
Therefore we use pesticides with their concomitant 
hazards. The Panel believes we must continue to do 
so but with adequate precautions. 

II. GAINS 

In the past 20 years great advances have been 
made in pest control. Pesticides have greatly reduced 
food losses and have l^rought blemish-free produce 
to market. The cost of food has l)een lowered. 
Herbicides, fungicides, rodenticides, nematocides and 
plant growth regulators contribute to the economical 
production of forage and grain as well as non-food 
crops such as cotton, tobacco and timber. They also 
help control communicable diseases by reducing inter- 
mediate host carriers of malaria, typhus, and yellow 
fever. They control nuisance pests such as mosquitoes 
and roaches. It is certain that the coming years will 
bring new methods and uses not yet contemplated. 

III. HAZARDS 

During the past 20 years we have dispensed huge 
volumes of synthetic compounds both intentionally 
and inadvertently. 

In small quantities these substances affect bio- 
logical systems in nature and may eventually affect 
human health. In higher concentrations most are 
highly toxic to ])eoi)le and wildlife. 

At present the area treated with i)esticides in 
the United States is one acre in twelve. Annual sales 



of aerosol "bug bombs" amount to more than one 
per household. 

Synthetic chlorinated hydrocarbons such as DDT 
and related compounds, dieldrin, aldrin, endrin, toxa- 
phene, lindane, methoxychlor, chlordane. and hepta- 
chlor persist in the environment in toxic form for 
years. DDT and its residues have been detected 
in oil of fish far at sea off every continent, in most 
of our major rivers, in ground water and deep wells, 
in fresh water fish, migratory birds, wild animals 
and shell fish. They turn up in dairy products from 
the United States, England, Europe and Asia and in 
the fat of the human inhabitants. 

The organic phosphorus compounds, parathion, 
malathion, phosdrin and TEPP decompose more 
rapidly but still persist for a year or two. 

Natural organic compounds such as pyrethrum, 
rotenone and nicotine are destroyed relatively rapidly, 
but inorganic substances containing copper, lead and 
arsenic are persistent. 

On foods entering interstate and foreign com- 
merce, which are subject to federal control, poisonous 
residues are held to low levels. On foods that do 
not cross state lines and are therefore not subject 
to federal control, and in birds and game fish, poison- 
ous residues have occasionally been found above 
federal tolerance limits. 

Skin absorbs insecticides most readily in oil 
solutions or organic solvents. It can also absorb 
them from water solutions, dust, aerosol, clothing, 
blankets, contaminated soil and lawn grass. Not 
enough is known about this and studies must be done. 

Inhalation occurs from spraying and fogging or 
from dusts from treated soil, house dusts, or moth- 
proofed rugs and blankets. 

Some deaths and acute poisoning occur each 
year as a result of misuse of pesticides and accidental 
exposure of children to them. Cases of less acute 
poisoning are generally not identified, as the symp- 
toms are similar to common illnesses. Very little is 
known of possible long term effects. 

Wild animal populations are more affected by 
pesticide residues than domestic animals and man. 
Shrimp and crabs and oysters are highly susceptible. 
Fish losses are extensive even with low rate applica- 
tion, and as much as 80% of a bird population has 
l:)een killed by heavy treatment with DDT for dutch 
elm disease control. 

(Cont'd nexf page) 



SCIENCE ADVISORY COMMITTEE-(Cont'd) 

At Clear Lake, California, water containing .02 
parts per million TDE produced plankton containing 
5 parts per million, which in turn produced fish with 
fat containing hundreds to thousands ppm. 

Chlorinated hydrocarbons in very small doses 
have caused liver damage to experimental animals and 
in larger doses have caused acute central nervous 
system effects, occasionally followed by death. DDT 
is somewhat less toxic to man than some related 
compounds, but it reduces the fertility and survival 
of young in birds and rats and can decimate popula- 
tions of marine inhabitants. 

Dieldrin and aldrin are many times more toxic, 
causing brain wave changes, convulsions, liver 
damage, reduction in fertility and increased mortality 
in offspring. 

Organic phosphorus compounds have high acute 
toxicities causing many fatal and some non-fatal 
poisonings in man. 

IV. PEST CONTROL WITHOUT CHEMICALS 

Biological methods of pest control have had com- 
paratively little attention in the United States. Breed- 
ing of resistant varieties of crops has worked well 
for some plant diseases. The grafting of French wine 
grapes to American rootstocks has brought about 
resistance to a root insect, Phylloxera. 

The control of insect pests by insect enemies or 
diseases is seldom complete enough to prevent eco- 
nomic damage, nor is it sufficient to prevent resur- 
gence. Furthermore, the host may become resistant 
just as it does to chemical controls. 

A new method of biological control is laboratory 
production and liberation of sterile male insects. It 
has eliminated the screw worm fly in Florida. The 
use of sex attractants to lure male insects to their 
death has great promise with certain species. 

V. THE ROLE OF GOVERNMENT 

IN PESTICIDE REGULATION 

In the federal government at present, The Public 
Health Service carries general responsibilities for 
human health, and The Fish and Wildlife Service 
for protection of wild animals. The Department of 
Agriculture (USDA) is responsible for pesticide con- 
trol. The Department of Health, Education and 
Welfare (HEW), acting through the Food and Drug 
Administration (FDA), is responsible for the safety 
of food containing pesticide residues. 

The USDA registers pesticides for use. If a 
pesticide leaves a residue on a food crop a residue 
tolerance must be determined by the FDA. However, 
by law, if a pesticide is refused registration by the 
USDA. it may nevertheless be registered "under 
protest" and marketed with no indication of its 
unsanctioned status. 

The Panel has found that decisions on safet}' 
are not as well founded as those on the efficacy of 
a product. 

Both USDA and FDA have enforcement pro- 
grams. The USDA is responsible for insuring proper 
lalselling. The FDA for insuring that tolerances are 
not exceeded. Some states control pesticide uses and 



enforce their own tolerances. 

A Federal Pest Control Review Board was es- 
tablished in 1961. However, its effectiveness is limited. 

VI. RECOMMENDATION 

The Panel feels that federal programs should be 
models of correct practice for the guidance of states, 
localities and private citizens. Every large scale oper- 
ation should be followed by a complete report which 
would appear in public literature. 

A broad educational program should be set up 
for the public, pointing out hazards of use and misuse 
of pesticides. 

The Panel feels that the Department of Health, 
Education and Welfare must (a) gather data from a 
sufficiently large number of people to give a clear 
understanding of the manner in which pesticides are 
absorbed, (b) cooperate with other departments to 
monitor residue levels in air, water, soil, man, wildlife 
and fish, and (c) assist states in regulating pesticide 
levels in food produced and consumed without cross- 
ing state lines. 

The diet studies by FDA should be expanded to 
include review of residue tolerances. 

It is recommended that HEW select a panel 
to re-evaluate current residue tolerances with the 
purpose of suggesting legislative changes. 

Even under present standards, new compounds 
should be more rigorously evaluated. 

The Panel feels that the present federal advisory 
and coordinating mechanisms are inadequate. Pro- 
posed federal control and eradication programs should 
be reviewed. The complete eradication of a pest is 
seldom possible. A control program, by contrast, 
applies a pesticide in less volume to a smaller area 
with fewer side effects, yet often with equivalent 
economic results. 

Research programs on pesticides in various fed- 
eral agencies must be coordinated. More research 
should be done to find selectively toxic chemicals, 
non-persistent chemicals and selective methods of 
application, as well as non-chemical control methods. 
More research must be done on toxicity in humans 
with respect to reproduction, chronic effect, and 
possible increased effect when used with common 
drugs. More research is also needed on toxicity in 
wildlife. 

It is recommended that "protest" registrations be 
eliminated, and that an appeal procedure be set up to 
protect manufacturers from arbitrary decisions. 

Every pesticide should carry its offical registration 
number on the label. 



Copies of the full report may be obtained by 
writing to the USDA, Washington 25, D. C. The 
Society's Library has several on hand. 



"A BLUE FOR AUTUMN. A valiant little plant is 
Plumbago larpentae, and when it begins flowering in 
September my thoughts turn Chinaward where coolies 
crowd the Shanghai street — or used to — in deep 
blue. In Shanghai it was first discovered, being among 
the treasure brought back to the Occident by that 
intrepid plant stalker, Robert Fortune." 

The Gardener's Bed Book 
by Richardson Wright 



. . . FROM THE PRESIDENT 

One of the most exciting periods in our history 
is rapidly approaching. The months of work on the 
plans for our new headquarters — thanks in great 
measure to the generosity, patience and professional 
skill of Mr. Henry Mirick — have been completed ; 
construction is under way. Mrs. Henry Breyer and 
Mrs. Van Horn Ely, working together as a newly 
formed House Committee, have given much thought 
to the decorating and furnishing of the new buildings 
so that they will be functional, attractive and dis- 
tinguished throughout. Your Executive Secretary and 
I have been hard at work on plans for expanding our 
programs and developing new ones when we are 
relocated — hopefully by next summer. We will, of 
course, be seeking additional endowment funds to 
accomplish all this, and I am sure that when you 
soon receive the details of our plans and possibilities, 
you will share with the Council, officers, staff and 
committee chairmen the great sense of anticipation 
and excitement that the future holds for every one 

of us. 

R. Gwynne Stout. 



TOUR OF ENGLISH GARDENS PLANNED 

The Society announces that it will sponsor a 
17-day Garden Tour to England in May 1964. The 
tour will be under the leadership of ^Irs. Edward J. 
Garra, who has planned the itinerary so that it will 
include some features not generally enjoyed on such 
trips. 

The tour will leave Philadelphia on Friday, May 
15 for the overnight flight to London. The weekend 
will be spent in sightseeing and a visit to the Royal 
Botanic Garden at Kew. 

Highlights of the first week will include the 
university town of Oxford, two da}s of leisurely 
driving through the story-brook villages of the Cots- 
wolds and visits to Hidcote Manor Gardens, Bodnant 
in Wales, the estate of Lord Aberconway, two Welsh 
border castles and their gardens, the American 
Museum at Bath, and Exbury with its famous 
rhododendrons and azaleas. 

R: The second week the tour will Ije in London with 
day trips to Hampton Court, the Saville Gardens in 
Windsor Great Park, Wisley, the Garden of the 
Royal Horticultural Society, Sissinghurst Castle, Pens- 
hurst Place. John Innes Horticultural Institute, Hat- 
field House and a special preview of the great Chelsea 
Flower Show. The tour will return on Sunday, 
May 31. 

A detailed itinerary is availaljle for any interested 
members. Just call and ask for it. Mrs. Garra will be 
in the Societv Rooms on the evening of October 17 
at 7:30 p.m. to discuss the tour and answer questions. 
Why not plan to come? 



GARDEN VISITS TO EXPLORE 

CHESTER SPRINGS 

Fall color in a rural setting will highlight the 
October garden visits on Sunday, October 13 in the 
Chester Springs area of Chester County. The route 
is planned to give some feeling of the delightfully 
quiet and restful atmosphere which prevails in this 
section, famous for fox hunting and farming since 
colonial days. 

Five gardens will be opened from 1 :30 to 5 :00 
P.M. T\\o routes are given, both include each garden. 

ROUTE 1 

Starting from the Dovvniiigtown e.xit of the Pennsylvania 
Turnpike, proceed south on Rt. 100 to Rt. 113. Follow 113 
north 4.9 miles to Old Rt. 113. Turn left and proceed .3 mile 
to the garden of: 

Mr. and Mrs. Lee M. Raden 

"Schytte on Pickering" 

Continue on old Rt. 113 for .8 mile to the residence of. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edmund K. Dawes 

Leaving Mr. and Mrs. Dawes' continue for 1.6 miles to 
an intersection. Cross straight over to Cold Stream road, go 
one block and turn right on Hare's Hill Rd. Follow back to 
Rt. 113 and turn right (south) for 1.9 miles to Pikeland Road. 
Turn left and proceed 2.3 miles to the residence of: 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph L. Eastwick 

"Springhead Farm" 

Leaving the farm, turn left and go back on Pikeland Rd. 
for 1 mile. Cross over intersection, bear left on Street Road, 
proceed .5 mile to the garden of: 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Bond Godshalk 

"Glen WiUow" 

Leaving here, continue on Street Rd. .\fter crossing 
Rapp's Corner, road becomes Bodine Road. 2.4 miles from 
"Glen Willow", see the garden of: 

Mr. and Mrs. George A. Reed, Jr. 

"Longview Farm" 

On leaving, go back across Turnpike to Seven Oaks Road. 
Turn left and proceed to Conestoga Rd. (401). Turn right to 
Rt. 113 and then left to return to Turnpike. 
ROUTE 2 

Approach Chester Springs on Rt. 401 from Paoli. Pass 
under Turnpike and turn right on Seven Oaks Road. Follow 
to Bodine Rd. Turn right and in .7 mile see the garden of: 

Mr. and Mrs. George A. Reed, Jr. 

On leaving, go back across the Turnpike and travel 2,4 
miles, across Rapp's Corner and on to Street Road to the 
garden of: 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Bond Godshalk 

Leaving here, continue on ,5 mile to intersection. Bear 
right on Pikeland Road for 1 mile to the residence of: 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph L. Eastwick 

On leaving the farm, turn left and continue on Pikeland 
Road for 2.3 miles to Rt, 113. Turn right and go .1 mile 
to old Rt, 113. In .3 mile see the garden of: 

Mr. and Mrs. Lee M. Raden 

Continue up this road .8 mile to the garden of: 

Mr. and Mrs. Edmund Dawes 

After returning to Rt. 113, follow to 401 and turn left 
there to reach Paoli. 



LAWN TIP 

Cool nights and some precipitation have brought 
most bluegrass and fescue lawns back to life. If your 
lawn looks terrible and you want to re-do the whole 
thing, or just part of it, we have a lawn sheet outlin- 
ing the steps you should take. It is not too late. New 
seed can be sown as late as October 15, though Sep- 
tember sowing is better. 

Several members have reported great satisfaction 
from having their new lawn sodded rather than 
seeded. While the cost is greater, the results are, of 
course, immediate. Mrs. Ballard or Miss Urian will 
be glad to advise meniljers on any lawn problems 
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GARDEN CLINICS 

See Registration Blank for reminder of the clinics 
for September and October which were described in 
detail in the September NEWS. 
CLINIC FOR NOVEMBER 

Tuesday, November 19 7:45 P.M. 

Home Grown Cut Flowers and Foliage for Indoors 

The urge to pick flowers and cut foliage for 
indoor decoration is universal. This clinic is designed 
to help members in the selection of seeds, nursery 
stock and other kinds of plants which will produce 
a year round supply of material for use indoors. Mrs. 
Ballard will instruct the clinic in the Society rooms. 
Fee $1.00. 



MORE ON THE POSTCARD 

We are learning all sorts of things about our 
members from the various fields of interest checked 
on the returned postcards. So far, less than half have 
been received. Is yours still on your desk? 

Bus reservation for Chester Springs 

A bus will leave Pennsylvania Blvd., in front of Suburban Station 
Building at 12 Noon. Sunday, October 13 for members of the Society and 
their guests. All reservations ($2.50 per person) must reach the Society 
ofEce by Wednesday, October 9. 





BUS RESERVATION 




GARDEN VISITS 




Chester Springs 




Sunday, October 13, 1963 


Name - 




•City „ „ 


Address „ 


Telephone 



DAFFODIL DAY 

The American Datf'odil Society will hold its 
Northeast Regional Meeting on Wednesday, October 
9, from 9 A.M. to 4 P.M. at the Springfield Golf 
Course and Country Club. 

Information and programs can be obtained from: 
Mrs. Francis L. Harrigan, Regional Vice-President, 
441 Maplewood Road, Springfield, Del. Co., Pa. 

8th ANNUAL SYMPOSIUM TO BE HELD 

"Plants from the Medicine Man to the Medical 
Man" is the theme of the Symposium scheduled for 
Wednesday, October 9, at Strawberry Mansion. 

Mrs. Mark E. Balis, 8000 Millman Place, Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 19118, can furnish additional information 
and programs. 



MEMBERS' EVENING: 
October 1 — 7:30 P.M. 

Members Show of Slides 

(Participants must contact Society in advance. 

LO 3-8352) 



Register by using the clip-out coupon. Please enclose check and 
mail to 389 Suburban Station, Phila. 19103. Registrations accepted 
in the order received; confirmation by return post card. 

GARDEN CLINIC RESERVATION 

Please register me for the following: 

D GARDENING INDOORS 

Sept. 26, Oct. 8 1:30 P.M. ($4.00) 

a SPECIMEN PLANTS FOR PHILADELPHIA 

FLOWER SHOW 

Oct. IS 1:30 P.M. ($2.00) 

D THE GARDEN YEAR, PART I 

Oct. 22 10:30 A.M. ($2.50) 

D HOME GROWN CUT FLOWERS AND 

FOLIAGE FOR INDOORS 

Nov. 19 7:45 P.M. ($1.00) 



Name 



Address 
City 



Telephone 



SOCIETY 



\7 PENNSYLVANIA BOULEVARD 
'PHILADELPHIA 3. PENNSYLVANIA 




ffO MARt* 



">L. IV, No. 10 



NOVEMBER, 



CITY PLANTINGS NEED CARE 

Modern architects, landscape architects and city 
planners tend more and more to incorporate plants 
in urban areas. A walk through the city will disclose 
plants in beds, pots, planters and window boxes, and 
in roof and terrace gardens. 

When successful, this is an admirable develop- 
ment. The plants themselves are pleasant to the eye 
and a welcome relief to the spirit. Their form en- 
hances the surrounding structures. Some outstanding 
examples in Philadelphia. are to be seen at the Federal 
Reserve Bank, Jefferson Hospital and Nurses Home, 
Independence National Park, the International Air- 
port and Penn Center Mall. 

Unfortunately not all urban plantings are success- 
ful, and nothing is as forlorn as an untended bed, 
filled with dead or dying material and rampant weeds. 
It is, therefore, pertinent to ask what are the factors 
that make for success. 

The first is the practicality of the design. Plants 
need light, a proper growing medium, water and 
drainage. They also need rain to wash soot and city 
dirt off their leaves. They will not grow under the 
overhang of a building and they cannot grow in a 
few inches of undrained clay. They stand a better 
chance of surviving the winter if their roots are in 
a large container that does not freeze solid. 

But design goes further than provision of a 
suitable habitat. The scale of the plants and their 
relation to the other spaces and structures are im- 
portant. This is why the tubbed trees in the Penn 
Center Mall are satisfying and the potted trees along 
Chestnut and Walnut Streets are not. 

The second factor is the selection of plant mater- 
ial. A healthy specimen of a tried and true city 
dweller like the Chinese elm, ginkgo, red oak or 
Norway maple or even ailanthus is far more attractive 
than some other species which, though charming in 
its native place, grows poorly in the fumes of city 
traffic. There is a little room for trial of new species, 
but it should be done sparingly so that an unhappy 
experiment will not spoil the total effect. 

Finally, successful gardening in the city, as 
everywhere, requires care and attention. The planners 
and owners of urban plantings must provide for 
maintenance by trained personnel who will water, 
weed, fertilize and prune as needed. They must also 

(Cont'd next page) 



EDGING AND PRUNING 

Edging and pruning are essential to successful 
gardening. No matter how well a garden is planned, 
it will look sloppy if it is not edged. No matter how 
careful the choice of plant material, the trees and 
shrubs will lose their forms and proportions if not 
pruned. Here are a few thoughts which may prove 
helpful in their management. 

1. Don't be afraid to carry the lawn all the way 
to a vertical surface. It is generally more satisfying 
to show a crisp right angle where the grass meets a 
wall or a tree than to blur the angle by planting ivy 
or pachysandra along the juncture. The key is meticu- 
lous edging. Even a few blades of long grass against 
the vertical surface will spoil the effect. 

2. If a structure is covered with vines, make 
apertures in the foliage to reveal the underlying 
surface. A wall completely cloaked in ivy is a formless 
mound of green. It recovers its character as a wall 
when the stonework shows through here and there. 
It is especially important to reveal the stones where 
they meet the ground or the lawn. 

3. If the grass tends to die or become sparse 
where the lawn runs into the shade of a wall or of 
overhanging foliage, try pulling out the scattered 
grass plants beyond the line of vigorous growth, and 
allow moss to replace them. The transition from 
grass to moss to wall is a pleasant one, and the mosses 
liverworts, ferns, selaginalla and other fern allies that 
will grow in such shady places are a constant source 
of interest. 

4. Plants that overhang the ground should not 
be permitted to touch it. Prune drooping branches 
or foliage until they lift an inch or two above the 
surface of the lawn, terrace or drive. The resulting 
clean line of demarcation will delight the eye. 

5. Keep trees and shrubs in proportion. Plant 
material can generally be kept to any specified size 
and shape by pruning. There is no need for a plant 
under a window to rise above the sill. Simply cut 
it oiif when it tries to do so. But don't cut in a 
straight line along the bottom of the sill. Go back 
to a crotch well below the desired height. This will 
produce a natural edge and leave room for a year 
or two of growth. 

6. Continuing the thought in the preceding para- 
graphs, when trees or shrubs are planted close to- 
gether, they should be pruned to keep a narrow space 

(Cont'd next page) 







Workmen on premises of 325 Walnut Street, the new 
headquarters of the Society. 

EDGING AND PRUNING-(Cont'd) 

between them. Branches may overlap, but they 
should never touch one another. By the same token, 
foliage should never be allowed to press against a 
wall. 

7. Prune trees and woody shrubs so as to par- 
tially reveal their trunks and main branches. Spaces 
between branches lead the eye back to the trunk or 
even entirely through the tree and create a sense of 
depth. This is one of the principles of bonsai culture. 
Indeed the study of bonsai is the best possible founda- 
tion for careful pruning and trimming. 

8. If you have a mature tree, the chances are 
that its trunk and roots have begun to expand at 
the surface of the ground, creating the impression 
that the tree is gripping the ground. If so, enhance 
the effect by stripping away soil and foliage so the 
base of the trunk and ground roots can be seen. 
This is another l)onsai principle that can be put to 
good use in any garden. 

9. The above rules do not apply in every case. 
Hedges and topiary, of course, should be cut to neat 
lines. Box bushes should present an unbroken billow- 
ing surface. Perhaps the only rule of general applica- 
tion i.*^ to keep constantly aware of the appearance 
of your planting. It was planned to be aesthetically 
satisfying. Your pruning and edging will keep it so. 



ANNUAL MEETING SCHEDULED 

A report from the President outlining the year's 
activities and achievements, election of Council mem- 
bers, a special program and refreshments are planned 
for the Society's 136th Annual Meeting which will 
be held Wednesday, November 20 at 3:30 P.M., 389 
Suburban Station Building. 

The governing body of the Pennsylvania Horti- 
cultural Society is its Council, elected each year at 
the Annual Meeting. Council members are elected 
for a three year period. 

To be presented for election at the 1963 Annual 
Meeting for terms expiring in 1966 are: 

Mrs. E. Page Allinson 
Dr. John M. Fogg, Jr. 
Mr. George Wood Furness 
Mrs. H. Cameron Morris, Jr. 
Mr. Frederick W. G. Peck 
Mr. Richard H. L. Sexton 
Miss Estelle L. Sharp 
Mr. John G. Williams 

Also to be presented are the names of Mr. 
William Weber and Mrs. Walter W. Pollock, Jr., who 
nominated by the Council in June to fill vacancies 
caused by resignations. The term of Mr. Weber will 
expire December 31, 1964, and that of Mrs. Pollock, 
December 31, 1965. (While the Council can fill va- 
cancies within its own body, these are valid only until 
the next annual meeting, when these names must be 
presented for election by the members.) 

The liy-laws also provide that additional nomina- 
tions may be made in writing by 15 or more members 
of the Society. 

Officers of the Society — President, two to four 
Vice Presidents, Secretary and Treasurer — are elected 
by the Council at the first meeting of the new year. 
The i)y-laws provide that no officers other than the 
Secretary and Treasurer may succeed themselves more 
than twice, so that an individual cannot hold the 
office of President or Vice President for more than 
three successive years. 



CITY PLANTINGS-(Cont'd) 

])rovide for replacement of plant material as it deter- 
iorates — which it is bound to do more rapidly in the 
city than in the country. There is no denying that 
the cost is substantial, but so is the cost of cleaning 
windows, polishing floors and otherwise preserving 
a building's appearance. If the building operation i 
cannot meet the cost of maintaining a planting, it is 
far better to omit the planting in the first place. 

The Society's staff is prepared to give advice on ' 
urban gardening in the planning stage, in plant 
selection and in the establishment of maintenance | 
procedures. 



CHRISTMAS SHOW HAS NEW LOCATION 



"Christmas in Foreign Lands" is the theme of 
the Society's annual Christmas Show to be staged 
in the lobb_v of the Western Saving Fund Society at 
Broad and Chestnut Street, opening December 11 and 
continuing through December 13. 

The schedule has been planned to make the best 
use of the spaciousness of the lobby, which is of 
open, modern design, rising two full stories in height. 

In addition to the competitive classes, a number 
of exhibits appropriate to the Christmas season will 
be staged by the Show Committee. These include a 
group of creches from foreign lands, topiary ivy, and 
a "how-to" demonstration of wreath-making. 

Mrs. H. Cameron Morris, Jr. is the Show 
Chairman. 
SCHEDULE 

1. A trimmed Christmas Tree, to be viewed from 
three sides. Trees five to six feet high will be 
supplied by the Society. Limited to 4 entries. 
Clubs or individuals may enter. 

2. A decorative Christmas wreath. Plant material 
must predominate. Outside dimension of wreath 
(diameter) to measure not less than 24" and not 
more than 36". 

3. A seasonal arrangement using a figure from a 
foreign land. Exhibitor to name country. 

4. A tall thin arrangement appropriate for Christmas 
to be staged on the main teller's counter. Ar- 
rangement may occupy a space 12" square and 
must be at least 2J/^ feet tall. 

5. A mass arrangement of greens in a bowl to be 
viewed from all sides. Berries permissible, but 
no artificial material allowed. 



6. .A. Christmas stocking. i\Iininium length 24". 
Limited to 6 entries. 

7. A Christmas package, to measure at least 8" in 
one dimension. 

8. A berried branch from a hardy tree or shrub. 

9. An evergreen branch from a hardy tree or shrub. 

10. A terrarium containing growing plants. 

11. A flowering or berried plant appropriate for 
Christmas. 

RULES 

1. All exhibits must be staged between 3 P.M. and 
5 P.M. on Tuesday, December 10, and must be 
removed between 3 P.M. and 5 P.M. on Friday, 
December 13. 

2. Only one entry per class allowed. 

3. Material in classes 8, 9 and 11 must have been 
in exhibitor's possession for at least two months. 

4. The decision of the judges will be final. 
Assistance in unloading will be provided. Exhibi- 
tors needing help please plan to use Broad Street 
Entrance between 3 P.M. and 4 P.M. No stopping 
allowed after 4 o'clock. 

AWARDS 

Awards will consist of seals : first, second, third 
and honorable mention. A special prize will be 
awarded to the most outstanding entry in the horti- 
cultural classes. The Blue and Gold award of the 
Garden Club Federation of Pennsylvania will be 
awarded, if merited, to the best of the blue ribbon 
winners in the artistic classes. 

CHRISTMAS SHOW ENTRY BLANK IS ON 
LAST PAGE. 



"There is, thank goodness, no such thing as 
a completely 'labour-free' garden." 

Will Ingwersen, V.M.H. 



MEMBERS' EVENING 

Mr. Frederick W. G. Peck, noted landscape archi- 
tect and member of the Council of the Pennsylvania 
Horticultural Society, will speak on Italian Gardens 
on November 5 at 7:30 P.M. 

Mr. Peck, who earned his degree in Landscape 
Architecture from the University of Pennsylvania, has 
studied the gardens of Italy first-hand on several occa- 
sions and is well qualified to speak about them. His 
talk will be illustrated with colored slides of the most 
outstanding, both old and new, from Naples to Lake 
Como and including such famous ones as the Villa 
d'Este. Villa Lante. Villa Farnese, Villa Aronati, and 
several around Florence. 

The library will be open at 6:00 for the conven- 
ience of members. Miss Nancy Urian. who has recent- 
Iv assumed the jiosition of librarian with the Society, 
will be on hand to greet members and help them 
select some winter reading. 



SOCIETY HONORED BY FEDERATION 

At the 33rd Annual Meeting of the Garden Club 
Federation of Pennsylvania, the Society was granted 
a Perpetual Honorary Membership. The membership 
was bestowed on the Society in appreciation of the 
long-standing association and mutual respect existing 
between the two organizations. Mrs. E. Page Allin- 
son, Vice President of the Society, accepted the 
award which was presented by Miss Mary Mitchell, 
a member of the Federation Board and a Life Member 
of the Society. 



CHRISTMAS GARDEN CLINIC 

Christmas is just not Christmas without a wreath 
or swag of fresh evergreens hung on the door or over 
the mantle. For those members who would like to 
make their own decorations this year, a wreath- 
making workshop is planned for December. During 
the class, everyone will be given materials to make 
a wreath which is then his to take home. Selection 
of evergreens, preparing cones and fruits, and other 
ways to decorate with greens will be demonstrated. 
Please bring a pair of shar]) ])runing shears. Satur- 
day, December 7. at 1:00 P.M. Fee: $5.00. Green- 
house of the Morris Arboretum, Chestnut Hill. 
Limited to 20 members. Instructor, Nancy G. Urian. 



BOOKS FOR GARDENERS 



Because the Library is our most valuable asset 
and our best source of information, we are devoting 
mucli of this issue of the NEWS to reviews of some 
of our recent acquisitions. Members are reminded 
that if they are unable to come in, a telephone call 
will bring any book from our collection to them by 
mail. Orders for new books are taken as well, and 
the proceeds help swell our Library Fund. Trade 
catalogs from plant specialists are available for use 
in the library as well as plant society publications, 
gardening magazines and reference works. 

Miss Nancy G. Urian, known to most members 
as our horticulturist, has recently been appointed 
Society Librarian. She will continue to answer your 
gardening questions and will be available for consul- 
tation. 

Look at a flower by Anne Ophelia T. Dowden. New 
York, Thomas Y. Crowell, 120 pp. Illus. $4.50. 

Anne Ophelia Todd Dowden must first have 
painted flowers and then studied botany, for her text 
is that of a captivated amateur explaining the in- 
tricacies of flowers to gardeners who have not taken 
time to notice. 

Flower parts are shown in some of their endless 
variety, and the ways in which they are pollinated 
and produce seed could not be more clearly shown. 
The botanical characteristics of ten familiar plant 
families are shown, and these include the highly 
specialized orchids and grasses. 

Particularly commendable is the design of the 
book. Mrs. Dowden has taken great care to pair 
drawing with text. Though she has used only three 
colors (other than black), these are so varied in tonal 
quality, that they seem more. 

L. B. 

Gourds by John Organ. Newton, Mass., Charles T. 
Branford Company (U. S. Edition), 1963. 189 pp. 
illus. $7.95. 

A gourd is a squash, is a melon, is a cucumber, 
is a marrow, is a pumpkin. If you are mixed up, so 
am I, and it is because this is a British book, with 
British usage of horticultural terms. 

Gourds, inclusive, have been used as food, uten- 
sils, musical instruments, toys and containers for 
thousands of years in most tropical and sub-tropical 
parts of the world. Mr. Organ's historical background 
of these plants is extensive and in many respects the 
most valuable part of the book. Culture of gourds 
is given much detailed attention from the viewpoint 
of British gardeners, who use them for decorative 
foliage i)lants both outdoors and in the greenhouse, 
as well as for their fruits as v^'e do. 

The book closes with recipes, and as a gesture 
to the United States, there is a recipe for "American 
Pumpkin Pie." 

L. W. 



The wonderful world of bulbs by Bebe Miles. Prince- 
ton, N. J., D. Van Nostrand Company, Inc., 1963. 
illus. $7.50. 

The title of this informative book is indicative 
of the author's enthusiasm for her subject. In the 
foreword, she states that the bulbs' good points are 
stressed more than their deficiences. From there, 
Mrs. Miles tells how to keep bulbs in healthy condi- 
tion (including a chart on pest controls by Cynthia 
W'estcott), lists ground rules which are practical to 
follow, and interjects chapters on groups of various 
bulbs as to their particular needs and handling. She 
also tells the interesting story of growing bulbs 
commercially. Planting charts, bulb societies and 
suppliers, and a list for flower arrangers are valuable 
appended references for the gardener. 

E. S. 

The joy of a small garden by Janet Gillespie. New 
York, Dodd, Mead & Company, 1963. 230 pp. illus. 

Simjily delightful — a truly fascinating saga of 
the development and maturing process of a female | 
gardener. An unusual and worthwhile addition is the | 
names and addresses in the text of nurseries where 
horticultural material can be purchased. ! 

D. G. B. 

Shrubs and trees for the home landscape by James 
Bush-Brown. Philadelphia, Chilton Books, 1963. 210 
pp. illus. $5.95. 

The gardener of today is too often faced with 
the problem of what tree or shrub to buy. The baffling 
array on display at both local and mail order nurseries 
is enough to confuse even the trained horticulturist. 

Mr. Bush-Brown finds something charming or 
worthwhile in almost every plant he describes, and 
makes, on the basis of his own wide experience, 
a recommendation for the use of each of the several 
hundred described. Complete cultural directions are 
included. The section on pruning is particularly good. 

E. D. B. 

Pocket guide to common wild flowers by Lawrence 

Xewcomb. Boston, The New England Wild Flower 
Preservation Society. 1963. 104 pp. 

Coupled with one of the colored picture guides, 
this book would be invaluable for the amateur wild 
flower enthusiast as well as one more skilled in plant 
identification methods. The keys are easy to follow 
and are i^receded liy clear instructions and a glossary 
illustrated by line drawings of leaf shapes, petal for- 
mations and flower cluster patterns. There is also a 
key to plant families as a guide to recognizing re- 
lated plants such as the mints, lilies, etc. The lack of 
accompanying illustrations is regrettable, but this book 
is an excellent guide for the wildflower collector. 

N. G. U. 



BOOKS IN REVIEW 



Compost for garden plot or thousand acre farm by 
F. H. Billington and Ben Easey. Boston, Charles T. 
Branford Company, 1956. 104 pp. $2.00. 

Messrs. Billington and Easey are "organic gar- 
deners" and as such are vitally aware of the import- 
ance of humus and other forms of organic matter in 
soils. The constant referrals and recommendations 
on the efTectiveness of animal manures in compost 
piles will be frustrating to most gardeners, and the 
authors' horror of chemical sprays and fertilizers may 
alienate some readers. 

Nevertheless, whether or not one is in entire 
agreement with them on the quality of naturally vs. 
chemically manured and treated crops, there is a lot 
of valuable information about soil and compost 
management in this little book. 

E. D. B. 

Miniature bulbs by Roy Genders. New York, St. 
Martin's Press, 1%3. 191 pp. illus. $6.75. 

This book is both factual and informative. It is 
detailed enough for the novice and amateur, and at 
the same time the varieties listed are comprehensive 
enough to interest and stimulate the advanced gar- 
dener. All facets of small bulb culture are covered. 

! N. S. T. 

Andre Le Notre garden architect to kings by Helen 
M. Fox. New York, Crown Publishers, 1963. 176 pp. 
illus. $7.50. 

Although Andre Le Notre died in 1700 his classi- 
cal design concepts are very much alive today. This 
well illustrated book is in some measure a biography 
of an era which saw the creation of some of the 
greatest gardens in the world. The author gives a 
vivid description of the garden fete given by Finance 
Minister Fouquet at his newly created Vaux Le 
Vicomte in honor of his King Louis XIV. 

The story of the creation of Versaille as the 
show-window of the power and glory of France is 
thrilling reading. Large trees were transplanted from 
all over France (75% of them died in the moving). 
Whole rivers were diverted through aquaducts to 
supply the lavish fountains. Regiments of royal 
soldiers were ordered away from military duty and 
put to work as garden workers to speed completion 
of the gardens. Flowers were grown by the millions 
to fill the parterres. 

But the book is not all extravaganza. There are 
clearly- drawn descriptions of the ideas which Le 
Notre perfected and which live on today as his great 
contribution to landscape design, applicable to the 
small garden as well as to city and community plan- 
ning. His clarity, his imaginative detail, his treatment 
of perspective, and above all his basic simplicity as 
expressed in his use of trees, grass, and water exem- 
plify his philosophy that art, not nature, is supreme. 

F. W. G. P. 



Flower arrangements through the year by Patricia 
Eastbrook Roberts. New York, Viking Press, 1963. 
illus. $5.95. 

This beautifully illustrated book is concerned 
mostly with arranging for the gardener who loves to 
fill her home with the flowers, foliage, and berried 
branches from garden or florist. Ideas for using avail- 
able plant materials in creative ways for each month 
of the year are prefaced by information on preparing 
and caring for fresh and dried materials and for 
preserving and forcing. Both the beginning arranger 
and the more adept will find much valuable help. 

S. C. F. G. 

The moutan or tree peony by Michael Haworth-Booth. 
New York, St. Martin's Press, 106 pp. illus. $3.95. 

A very complete book on every aspect of the tree 
peony. Particularly fascinating is the history of these 
plants, dating back to at least A.D. 536 in China in its 
wild state, through its hybridizing in Japan, Europe 
and America, up to the present. 

Propagation and cultural descriptions are clear 
and concise. Color would add a great deal. 

J. B. T., Jr. 

Plant breeding for everyone by John Y. Beaty. 
Boston, Charles T. Branford Company, 1954. 102 pp. 
illus. $2.75. 

Mr. Beaty, for some years an associate of Luther 
Burbank, has written a readable and informative book 
for amateurs. There is, perhaps, too much emphasis 
on the chance discovery and too little on the patience 
necessary for any planned program of plant breeding. 

Techniques of hybridization, evaluation and test- 
ing are emphasized, and lists of desirable and unde- 
sirable attributes are described. It contains much 
helpful information not readily available previously 
to the amateur. 

This book is an easily understood, basic text 
recommended for all who wish to try their hand at 
plant improvement. 

R. W. L. 

1001 house plant questions answered by Stanley Schu- 
ler. Princeton, N. J., D. Van Nostrand Company, 
278 pp. Illus. 

1001 questions, each with its specific answer, 
makes this book a reliable source of practical infor- 
mation not usually found in a discussion type book. 
The questions are cleverly framed and are answered 
directly and clearly : "Can I grow pittosporum in- 
doors?", "Yes, if you can provide a cool south window, 
45-55° F." 

There are three sections: general culture, specific 
problems for plants from A to Z and useful lists, such 
as plants for north, east, south and west windows, 
vines, fruiting plants, even plants that "take care of 
themselves." 

L. W. 



999Z 'ON lIKSaad 
•BJ 'emdiapeimd 

Q I V d 

asvisod s n 




CHRYSANTHEMUM SHOW AT 
VALLEY FORGE 

This year's Chrysanthemum Show, in which the 
Society is acting as coordinator for nine gardening 
groups, will take place in the cafeteria of the American 
Baptist Convention at Valley Forge on Saturday, 
November 2 from 3 to 10 P.M. and Sunday, Novem- 
ber 3, from 12:30 to 5 P.M. The building, already 
famous in the area because of its striking contemporary 
design, is located on Route 23, west of the Pennsyl- 
vania Turnpike. 

William H. Weber of Erdenheim Farms is the 
show chairman, and is assisted by representatives of 
the following sponsoring organizations : Men's Chry- 
santhemum Club of Norristown, Delaware Valley 
Chrysanthemum Society, Germantown Horticultural 
Society, Burholme Horticultural Society, Philadelphia 
and Wilmingfton Branches National Association of 
Gardeners, Norristown Garden Club and the Valley 
Forge Garden Club. 

Schedules may be obtained by writing or tele- 
phoning the Society. Admission is free. 



Register by using the clip-out coupon. Please enclose check and 
mail to 389 Suburban Station, Phila. 19103. Registrations accepted 
in the order received; confirmation by return post card. 

GARDEN CLINIC RESERVATION 

Please register me for the following: 
D THE GARDEN YEAR, PART I 

Oct. 22 10:30 A.M. ($2.50) 

D HOME GROWN CUT FLOWERS AND 

FOLIAGE FOR INDOORS 

Nov. 19 7:45 P.M. ($1.00) 

D MAKE YOUR OWN CHRISTMAS WREATH 

Dec 7 1:00 P.M. ($5.00) 



Name 



Address 
City 



Telephone 



GIFTS TO THE LIBRARY 

Newr Cyclopedia of American Horticulture, L. H. 
Bailey, 4th ed., 1906, 6 vols. Presented by Mrs. Claire 
Stevens. 

Botanic Garden, Benjamin Maund, 1826-1832, 97 
installments. Presented by Aurinda B. White in 
memory of St. Clair La Dow. 

Herb Grower Magazine, Aug. 1948- March 1%3 
complete. Presented by Mrs. Adolph A. Walkling. 

Desigtis in Nature, Tet Borsig. Presented by R. 
Gwj'nne Stout. 



THE PENNSYLVANIA BONSAI SOCIETY 

is having a combination Exhibition and SaJe 
on Saturday, October 19 through Sunday, 
October 27 at the Tyson Galleries, Playhouse Inn, 
New Hope, Pa. 



WINTER ARRANGEMENTS TO BE SHOWN 

Mrs. James C. Hornor, Chairman of the Educa- 
tional Exhibits, has announced plans for a display of 
winter arrangements made entirely from locally grown 
materials. This exhibit will be staged during the 
week of November 18, coinciding with the clinic: 
"Home Grown Cut Flowers and Foliage for Indoors", 
and with the Annual Meeting. 






r 



CHRISTMAS SHOW ENTRY BLANK 

Clip out and mail to: 

389 Suburban Station Bldg. 

by November 25, 1963 
Please reserve space for my entry in the 

following classes : 



Name 

Address 

Telephone 



THE PENNSYLVANIA 
HORTICULTURAL 



SOCIETY 



r6l7 PENNSYLVANIA BOULEVARD 
PHILADELPHIA 3. PENNSYLVANIA 




VOL IV. No. 1 1 



DECEMBER, 1963 



PLANNING THE GARDEN 



Winter is not unl}- the time to study flower 
catalogues; it is also the time to plan the garden. 
But, oddly enough, gardens are seldom planned. The 
houseowner who would not think of installing the 
dishwasher in the living room is perfectly willing 
to have his automobile as a backdrop to the children's 
playpool. Many gardens present a hodge-podge of 
conflicting interests, as anyone knows who has ob- 
served the non-gardener confronted with an acre of 
lawn or the young baseball player supervised by the 
flower-lover. The overlapping of unplanned activities 
can turn a so-called garden into a traffic jam. On the 
other hand, a quite small garden can accommodate 
numerous activities and interests if it is planned so 
that they do not bump into one another. 

The planning of a garden starts within the walls 
of the house and extends outwards as far as the 
interests of the inhabitants. How many are you and 
what ages? What does, each of you do and how much 
space will it take? How do you get from the front 
door to the seesaw, from the car to the kitchen? 
A map of the traffic pattern can eliminate many 
cross-currents. 

Among the more important facts to be taken into 
account early in the planning process is the amount 
of labor that you will or will not put into the garden. 
Many gardens look shabby most of the time because 
their owners do not do the jobs required to keep 
them presentable. A basic rule for outdoor planning 
is : never set up a requirement you don't want to 
fulfill. The non-gardener should not be faced with 
flower beds. If you have the will but not the time to 
fertilize a Merion blue lawn or prune an espalier, hire 
somebody to do it for you. If you haven't the money 
to hire somebody, find substitutes that need less care. 

When you have assembled the human facts of 
the situation, look at the physical facts. Owners of 
new houses should consider the lay of the land, soil, 
climate, water supply, proximity of neighbors, and 
existing plants, if any. The owner of an existing 
garden, besides these considerations, must weigh the 
advantages and disadvantages of maintaining the 
garden he has been presented with — on the one hand, 
the saving in construction costs, the presence of large 
plants that couldn't be bought in any nursery, the 
beauty of an old wall that could no longer be dupli- 
cated — on the other, the paths leading to nowhere, 



the specimen )-ew obscuring the best \iew from the 
house, the terrace in precisely the wrong place. All 
too often an old garden seems impossible to get rid 
of. One must remember that gardens are essentially 
personal. They can and should change with their 
owners. A gardener's satisfaction in his or her par- 
ticular garden is like Deborah Delores, who stood 
on her head 

". . . for her breakfast and her tea. 
It might do for you : 
It would never do for me." 

There are no rules to follow in the physical 
design of the garden, once the human needs and 
physical facts have been assembled. No situation 
repeats itself exactly ; no two families are alike. How- 
ever, certain tests should be passed in each case. 
One of these is appropriateness. A house full of 
children cannot a])propriately use a garden given over 
to prize rose beds. The Japanese awareness of indi- 
vidual form, their understanding of the refreshing 
quality of the accidental, their recognition of the 
value of gardens as symbols of the total landscape 
are appropriate to the American frame of mind. But 
the rigid aesthetic, social and moral values that give 
the Japanese garden its particular shape and form 
are totally alien to the average American. For most 
people a garden is fully satisfying when it reflects 
the knowledge and feelings of today, with full recog- 
nition that modern usage is built upon the past. A 
modern house in colonial style should have a garden 
which is appropriate to it in scale and feeling. There 
is no reason why this garden should not employ box- 
wood and brick. There is equally no reason why it 
should use the exact forms that were used at 
Williamsburg. 

Another test of the well-planned garden is the 
richness of its appeal to the senses. Consider a 
reading place for an adult. What does he hear — a 
fountain dripping, a clump of bamboo rustling? What 
does he see — a tree in blossom, a bronze statue 
against a green shrub? What does he smell — lavender 
in June, grapes in September? Do his feet walk on 
pebbles, grass or paving? Can he find a sassafras twig 
to chew if he so desires? 

(Cont'd next page) 



PLANNING THE GARDEN-(cont'd) 

A third test is the presence of harmony among 
the different elements of the plan. The Victorian 
placement of flower beds in lawns showed a myopic 
concentration on the part and a disregard of the 
whole. The Japanese are pre-eminent in their recog- 
nition of the subtle harmonies and disturbances that 
objects can create amongst themselves. The needs 
of your garden — the walk to the pool, the place for 
the flowers, the big and the little spaces — should 
always be thought of in relation to one another, not 
as separate and isolated objects. A permanent object, 
such as a statue or a pool, should be viewed in rela- 
tion to the rest of the garden. These relationships 
can be described in terms as simple as dark-light, 
solid-transparent, high-low, heavy-light, and planning 
in such terms will enable you to place the statue or 
the pool in the most pleasing juxtaposition to the 
trees, the grass, the sunlight or the shade. 

A garden, though composed of many elements 
and embodying a complex of emotions, will, if 
thoughtfully and feelingly planned, present in the end 
a simple and effortless effect. The unifying factor is 
often expressible in something as simple as a dominant 
feeling. A garden which fills its owners' many needs 
will be described as sunny or charming. All of 
Versailles — the fountains, walks, parterres and masses 
of trained trees — can be lumped under the term 
"grandeur." It is the aim of all creative effort to 
improve on the material at hand; it is its victory if 
the marks of the making do not show. 



"There 


is no 


sight so 


s+imulafing 


to the 


gardener as 


that 


of other 


people's 


ways of 


growing and 


group 


ng flowers 


' ' 








The Well-Considered Garden | 






by M 


rs. Francis 


King 



LIBRARY NOTES 

If you plan to give garden books this Christmas 
now is the time to order them through the Society's 
library. We have a number of interesting new 
books (see reviews in back issues of the NEWS) 
which offer a wide selection of gardening information. 
Among the other books in our collection you will find 
more gift ideas ; outstanding one-volume garden en- 
CN'clopedias, guides to plant identification, books 
geared to young gardeners, historical garden biog- 
raphies, garden design manuals, botanical text books, 
indoor gardening and greenhouse instructions, and a 
variety of illustrated flower arranging books. 

We also have a number of fine garden handbooks 
which are generally inexpensive paper-bound editions 
such as the new "Native Plants of Pennsylvania" 
issued by Bowman's Hill State Wild Flower Preserve. 
The Brooklyn Botanic Gardens have many excellent 
handbooks for $1.00 each. A recent edition is en- 



titled "Greenhouse Handbook for the Amateur." We 
have added two new Sunset books, "How to Build 
Decks for Outdoor Living" and "Basic Gardening 
Illustrated," both $1.95. There's also a superb guide 
for "Photographing Your Flowers" by the Roches. 

The journals published by the various plant 
specialist societies are invaluable to the hobbyist. 
Perhaps a membership to one of these groups would 
be a perfect gift. Our horticultural librarian, Nancy 
G. Urian, will be glad to help you select appropriate 
books and other gardening literature. Write or call 
her at LO 3-8352. 



The Gardener's Year by Karel Capek, Dover Publi- 
cations, Inc., $1.00. 

The author of this book is also the author of 
R.U.R. and The war with the newts, works which 
envision the end of humanity in regimented automa- 
tion. IVfr. Capek evidently developed his passion for 
the individual from such pastime as creating a garden. 
In The gardener's year he describes with immense 
sympathy and charm plants (whole tantalizing lists,) 
earth, weather, and the gardener himself — single- 
minded, innocent, emotionally immersed in his craft. 
The illustrations have the same simple and direct 
appeal as the text — Joan Taylor 



Selected Botanical Papers, edited by Irving William 
Knobloch, Prentice-Hall, $3.95. 

This nicely printed paperback gives the amateur 
horticulturalist considerable food for thought. The 
contents will supply bedside reading for several weeks 
— short essays on botany, ecology, plant exploration, 
morphology and physiology, radio and space biology, 
plants and medicine, horticulture, forestry, conserva- 
tion, paleobotany, cytology, genetics, evolution, and 
pure science — by authors as ancient as Theophrastus, 
as prestigious as Asa Gray, as modern as Russel 
Seibert. The intended audience would appear to be 
high school seniors or college freshmen (some of the 
pieces are marred by condescension) and the under- 
lying premise is apparently that the young mind can- 
not be applied to a serious subject more than 15 
minutes. That, at least, is the longest reading time 
for any essay. 

But aside from the passing pleasure of reading 
one of these miniatures before turning out the light, 
the reader can scarcely avoid a quickening of interest 
in one or more of the many subjects. The fact is 
that good writing on horticultural subjects is hard 
to come by. Most current publications are either as 
topical as how to grow begonias or as formidable 
as a text on genetics. The amateur who wants good 
reading between these extremes will search the book 
reviews for months without finding an attractive item. 

That is where this book comes in. It reminds 
us that horticulture is an old subject and one which 

(Cont'd last page) 



MEMBERS' EVENING 

On Tuesda)', Decemljer 3 the speaker will be 
Dr. Richard Lighty who has been a member of the 
staff at Longwood Gardens since 1960. Dr. Lighty 
is in charge of experimental work there and is present- 
ly working on the improvement of a number of genera 
including delphinium and camellia. He is well quali- 
fied to speak on lilies having studied them from a 
scientific standpoint during the course of his post- 
graduate studies. The program will begin at 7:30 P.M. 

The Society offices will be open from 5 :00 for 
the benefit of members who want to use the library 
before the meeting begins. 



NOTES ON POINSETTIAS 

Poinsettias, brought to perfection by growers in 
the Delaware \''alle\', will soon be filling florists' 
windows and shops. Few people realize the amount 
of work and skill that is required to get these plants 
ready for the Christmas season. 

The poinsettia, (the botanical name is Euphorbia 
pulcherrima) is a shrubby perennial native to Mexico 
and Central America. It was introduced into the 
florists trade by Robert Buist, who was a member of 
the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society and served as 
its Treasurer and Vice-President between 1830 and 
1875. 

The poinsettia plants which the florists sell at 
Christmas are grown from cuttings made during July, 
August and September. Most growers use stock plants 
obtained from Paul Ecke, of California, who has made 
this a life-long specialty. The cuttings root readily 
in two to four weeks, and are then potted into 2% 
pots. In late September they are "panned" into the 
6", 8", 10" or 12" pots in which they will be "finished." 

Poinsettias are very sensitive to chills, drafts, 
sudden temperature changes, and water deficiency. To 
achieve fine specimens, growers space their pans care- 
fully on their greenhouse benches so that air circulates 
freely and each plant receives the full benefit of 
whatever winter sunshine is available. Careful atten- 
tion must be paid to watering, fertilizing and insect 
control throughout the growing period. 

Nights must be twelve hours long before poin- 
settias will set flower buds. This fortunate fact 
means that the buds will begin to form shortly after 
the equinox (Septemljer 21) and that the plants will 
be in flower exactly on schedule for Christmas. As 
the buds develop, the bracts surrounding them grad- 
ually turn from green to red, or white or pink, depend- 
ing on the variety. It is these colored bracts which 
provide the displays ; the flowers themselves are 
comparatively inconspicuous. 

As the stems grow, a few of the oldest leaves 
(always at the bottom) turn yellow and fall off. 
Unfavorable conditions may cause this to ha])pen 
sooner or to a greater extent, and it is almost in- 
evitable on plants moved from controlled greenhouse 
conditions to houses, offices and public buildings. 
To counteract the resultant bare eft'ect. growers plant 

(Cont'd last page) 



GARDEN CLINICS 

In January a series of two evening clinics 
BOTANY FOR GARDENERS will be conducted in 
the Society rooms by Dr. John M. Fogg, Jr., Director 
of The Morris Arboretum and Professor of Botany 
at The University of Pennsylvania. 

Designed especially for serious gardeners who 
want to know more about how plants grow the series 
will cover the relationship between the whole plant 
and its environment. 

The first lesson will deal with roots, stems and 
leaves, their structures, functions and relation to each 
other and will also consider water absorption and 
photosynthesis. 

The topic of the second clinic will be conditions 
affecting plant growth — climate, environment, soils, 
day length, rainfall and soil moisture. 

The two clinics are a series designed to supple- 
ment one another. No separate reservations will be 
accepted for either clinic — They will be held on the 
evenings of January 9th and 16th at 7:30 P.M. Fee 
for the series : $4.00. 

In the fall Mrs. Garra held the first in a series of 
clinics planned to help gardeners with their garden 
activities throughout the year. In January the second 
part of THE GARDEN YEAR offers those interested 
in raising their own vegetables the opportunity to 
learn how to plan a home produce garden. The clinic 
will include the basic planning, preparation of soil, 
selection of small fruits and vegetables, and practical 
easy management of the plants through to harvest. 
Special emphasis will be given the proper care neces- 
sary for table quality vegetables worthy of the gar- 
dener's pride. Thursday evening, January 23, at 7:30 
in the Society rooms. Fee : $2.00 per member. Instruc- 
tor, Martha Ludes Garra. Registration form for all 
clinics appears on last page. 



THANKS - - - 

The NEWS is the voice of The Pennsylvania 
Horticultural Society. While the staff is responsible 
for editing and production, much of the horticultural 
content is contributed by the membership. 

Our sincere thanks and appreciation go to the 
following members who have contributed ideas, sug- 
gestions, and manuscrijits during the last year: 

Gearld D. Laulis 
Richard Lighty 
Miss Viola Anders 
Mrs. J. Folsom Paul 
Mrs. Edward J. Garra 
William Green 
Miss Estelle Sharp 
Mrs. John G. Williams 
Joseph B. Townsend, Jr. 
Frederic L. Ballard, Jr. 
Miss Joan Taylor 







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POINSETTIAS-(Cont'd) 

ferns in the middle of the clump of poinsettias. Some 
put the ferns in the pans at the same time as the 
poinsettias. Others save the space Isy inserting an 
empty 2^/4" pot which is later replaced by a fern. 
There is a movement in some parts of the country to 
omit this refinement, but Philadelphians are fortunate 
that Delaware Valley growers still use ferns to soften 
the bare stems and add a finished look. 

About December 15, the plants are ready for 
market. Because they have been grown in a warm, 
moist, greenhouse, green algae has probably developed 
on the pots and must be scrubbed off. Then the plants 
are carefully wrapped. The bracts surrounding the 
"flowers" are carefully bent upward and inward and 
secured with tissue paper, which is fastened with 
tape or a rubber band. After each flowering head is 
wrapped (large plants sometimes have as many as 
twenty) the whole plant is done up in paper and 
loaded into a heated truck for delivery to the florist. 

The Society of American Florists reports that 
approximately 7,000,000 are sold each year. 



Register by using the clip-out coupon. Please enclose check and 
mail to 389 Suburban Station, Phila. 19103. Registrations accepted 
in the order received; confirmation by return post card. 

■ — — — — — — — — — — — 1 

GARDEN CLINIC RESERVATION | 

D MAKE YOUR OWN CHRISTMAS WRE.\TH 

Dec 7 1:00 P.M. $5.00 | 

D BOTANY FOR GARDENERS i 

Jan. 9, Jan. 16 7:30 P.M. $4.00 ' 

n THE GARDEN YEAR — PART II | 

Jan. 23 7:30 P.M. $2.00 



Name 



Address 
City 



LIBRARY NOTES-(Cont'd) 

does not evolve as fast as some. The real message 
of "Selected Botanical Papers" is — don't forget the 
Pennsylvania Horticultural Society library. If you 
enjoy the taste of Asa Gray or Alexander Von Hum- 
boldt presented here, a visit to the Society offices will 
repay you with volumes of their works. If the snatches 
from Alfred Russel Wallace and Sir Gavin de Beer 
whet your interest in evolution, you will find a whole 
section on the subject in our library. 

In short, if you have felt an inclination to do 
some horticultural reading without knowing quite 
where to begin, try "Selected Botanical Papers," and 
follow your fancy from there. 

F. B. 



CHRISTMAS SHOW 

"Christmas in Foreign Lands" is the theme of 
the Society's annual Christmas Show which will open 
on Wednesday, December 11 and will continue 
through Friday, December 13. The show will be 
staged in the spacious lobby of the Western Saving 
Fund Society at Broad and Chestnut Streets. 

A number of interesting and instructive exliibits 
are being planned. These include a visual wreath- 
making demonstration, a special display of creches 
from foreign lands, a Mexican Christmas tree and a 
collection of topiary ivy specimens. 

In addition, there will be eleven competitive 
classes calling for both artistic and horticultural 
entries. The schedule and entry blanks appeared in 
the November NEWS. Additional copies may be 
obtained !)y calling the office LO 3-8352. 



Telephone 



i 



SOCIE 



\7 PENNSYLVANIA BOULEVARD 
THILADELPHIA 3. PENNSYLVANIA 




J^rcD MARt» 



VOL V, No. I 



JANUARY, 1964 



news 



PHYTOILLUMINATION - 
GROWING PLANTS UNDER ARTIFICIAL LIGHT 



More and more gardeners are growing indoor 
plants under artificial light. Like all techniques, this 
one has many ramifications and there are conflicting 
opinions as to what is good, what is better and what 
is best. Many factors must be considered. Tempera- 
ture, humidity, the type of container, fertilizers and 
the growing medium must all be suitable for the 
plants being grown. The installation of lights will 
not cure troubles which were inherent before the 
lights were used. 

The aim of this article is to provide some guide 
lines for those who would like to have an artificially 
lighted garden and are puzzled about how to begin. 
The information is based on the experience of 
members. 

Light from fluorescent fixtures is dull when com- 
pared, as it must be when talking about plant growth, 
to the light of the sun. The illumination provided 
by four new 40-watt standard cool white tubes at a 
point one inch below the tubes is 1800 foot candles. 
Disregarding special power tubes which are too expen- 
sive and heavy to be practical, this is just about the 
brightest light that can be attained with fluorescent 
fixtures. By way of comparison, the sun's illumina- 
tion at noon on a clear day in summer is 10,000 foot 
candles. For this reason, plants which grow naturally 
in subdued light or jungle shade are more suitable 
for phytoillumination than plants which are native to 
open, sunny plains and semi-deserts. 

Specimen gesneriads, begonias, and tropical foli- 
age plants can be produced after only a little practice 
by a conscientious gardener, whereas geraniums, 
cacti, snapdragons, carnations and similar material 
grown under tubes will not com])are favoral)ly with 
greenhouse grown plants of the same species. Seed- 
lings of garden plants started indoors in early spring 
and grown under artificial lights for their first few 
weeks are apt to be stronger and more compact than 
those grown on a windowsill. However, in most 
cases, seedlings large enough to be transplanted will 
need Isrighter light than would be available from 
artificial sources. 

A minimum of two four-foot tubes placed two 
inches apart will be needed for satisfactory results. 



Longer tul)es are brighter. Shorter tubes provide 
less light per inch and will lead to frustration. Addi- 
tional multiples of the basic four-foot double unit will 
give more growing space, but will not make the grow- 
ing area significantly ijrighter. The cost is about $20. 
for a four-foot fixture \\ith a reflector and two fluore- 
scent tubes. 

The ])lant benches should be so arranged that 
the foliage of the plants is between six and twelve 
inches from the tuljes. This is often a major dis- 
appointment for interior decorators. It is virtually 
impossible to use phytoillumination for large plants 
in large spaces because of the necessity of having 
the tubes literally on top of the foliage. Successful 
installations are confined to smaller spaces where the 
tubes can be ])ut under a shelf or overhang as in 
bookcases, kitchen cupboards, and pieces of furniture. 
Most gardeners find a special setup with lights 
and shelves arranged in tiers most satisfactory, par- 
ticularly when placed in the cellar or an unused 
hallway where the plants can be freely watered, the 
humidity can be kept high, and the temperature 
controlled. 

A variety of tubes are available. Literature on 
which to l)uy is confusing, and it is the opinion of 
our members that one gives as good results as the 
next. The names given the tubes by the manufacturers 
are descriptive of the quality of the light as it appears, 
not as it really is. Warm white, daylight, natural 
white and cool white could be called blue, yellow, 
white and oyster. Which you use is a matter of taste 
depending on whether you think the plants look 
better under a warm colored light or a cooler one. 
"Gro-lux" and "Plant-Gro" are lamps developed by 
Sylvania and Westinghouse for growing plants. They 
contain very little of the green and yellow portions 
of the spectrum and give ofif a lavender glow, dis- 
torting the colors of the plants, but glamorizing red, 
l)lue, and jnirple flowers. Their special s])ectrum is 
designed to promote photosynthesis, but any resulting 
improvement in growth is hard to detect under home 
conditions. Whichever tubes are used, frequent re- 
newal is desirable. After 200 hours, the light given 
ofl^ is diminished liy about one-quarter its original 

(Cont'd last page) 



"We have often heard wonder expressed at 
the beauty of some plant grown in the poor man's 
parlor — a beauty which those of his wealthy 
neighbor do not attain. The reason is simple: in 
the one case, the wants are well provided for; in 
the other, they are neglected or over supplied." 

Flowers for the Parlor & Garden 

Edward Sprague Rand, Jr. 1863 



GARDEN CLINICS FOR FEBRUARY 

PLANNING THE HERBACEOUS BORDER 

How to plan an herbaceous border of flowering 
plants which will provide continuous color from 
spring to fall will be the subject of a three-part 
clinic during February. 

The first session will include a discussion of 
the value of a basic plan and the mechanics of plan- 
ning the border. A problem will be assigned for the 
following session. At the second meeting these prob- 
lems will be criticized and another plan assigned. 
This final assignment will be an herbaceous border 
by each member for her own garden. At the last 
session, these designs will be discussed and corrected. 
In June, the instructor, Mrs. Edward J. Garra, will 
invite the class to her own garden. Thursdays, Fel3. 
6, 13, 27 at 10:30 A.M. Society rooms. Fee $15.00. 

A NURSERYMAN TALKS ABOUT LANDSCAPING 

Landscape Design means more than a pretty 
garden; it must meet such problems as an adequate 
driveway, entrance, and outdoor living space. These 
problems are opportunities for each garden to be 
unusual and give pleasure to the owners. William 
H. Frederick, Jr., a landscape designer and nursery- 
man from Newark, Delaware, will show pictures of 
three gardens and how their individual problems 
were solved by judicious planting. This clinic will be 
held Thursday evening, February 20, at 7:30 P.M. 
William H. Frederick, Jr., instructor. Fee $2.00. 



MEMBERS' EVENING 

On January 7th, the subject fur the evening will 
be "Gardening Indoors." Ernesta D. Ballard, Execu- 
tive Secretary of the Society will speak on this subject 
which has been her speciality for several years. Many 
members have visited her house and seen her collec- 
tion which includes large tropical trees, tiny bonsai, 
begonias, African violets, ferns, foliage plants and 
many others. Mrs. Ballard will illustrate the talk 
with colored slides and specimen plants. 

The program will begin at 7 :30. The Society 
offices will remain open from 5 :00 o'clock until the 
end of the evening so that members niav use the 
library during the dinner hour. 




Steel girders being put in place in the reconstruction 
of the Society's new offices at 325 Walnut Street. 

ABOUT THE NEW HEADQUARTERS 

Tke Pennsylvania Horticultural Society is deeply in- 
debted to the Philadelphia Society for Promoting Agricul- 
ture for our prospective new quarters in The Independence 
National Historical Park. On our own we would fall 
twenty-seven years short of the Park's requirement that 
resident organizations date from the seventeen hundreds. 
The Society for Promoting Agriculture, well rooted in the 
eighteenth century, is to be our sponsor and will give us 
the lion's share of the renovated buildings which are to be 
the joint headquarters of both societies. The following 
notes on the history of the Philadelphia Society for Pro- 
moting Agriculture were taken from a work written by 
Stevenson Whitcomb Fletcher, Dean Emeritus of the College 
of Agriculture at the Pennsylvania State University: 

Founded in 1785, the Philadelphia Society for 
Promoting Agriculture is the oldest American agri- 
cultural society in existence, and. according to Dean 
Fletcher, it has also been the most influential. 

In 1785 with the American Revolution won and 
the new nation born, a group of influential and 
wealthy gentlemen farmers founded the Society in 
order to help, not only the agricultural industry, 
which incidentally was the largest in the nation, but 
also their country. Their motives were patriotic and 
sincere. They considered it their duty to bring the 
latest scientific methods and improvements in agri- 
culture to the attention of the working farmer. 

From its founding, the Society has offered annual 
premiums and awards for agricultural papers, experi- 



meats and exhibits. In this way experimentation and 
new methods have been encouraged and notable 
achievements in the agricultural sciences recognized 
by men who were not only leaders in the politics and 
affairs of the most important city in the new nation. 
but were also the most knowledgable in agricultural 
theory and practice. 

By 1790, the Society had gained national prom- 
inence. It had established contacts and maintained 
active correspondence with similar groups, many of 
which were modeled after the Philadelphia Society in 
all parts of America and Great Britain. Its publica- 
tions had wide circulation. Working farmers however, 
were slow to accept the help being offered them by 
the rich and cultured gentlemen who gave so much 
to the Society in its first 50 years. Richard Peters, 
a charter member and President from 1805 to 1828 
complained about "those who receive everything writ- 
ten with distrust and hesitation ; and suppose that 
none are acquainted with husbandry but those who 
hold the handles of the plough." 

Because membership of the Society was com- 
posed of educated men, its lil^rary was carefully built 
and maintained. Since there was very little early 
American literature on agricultural subjects, many of 
the books were British publications. This library is 
now considered one of the finest collections of books, 
periodicals and pamphlets in early American agricul- 
ture in the United States. In 1920 the membership 
of the Society decided that the library would be de- 
voted to such volumes as pertained to agriculture in 
its earlier stages that might not be found in a general 
agricultural library. It has been housed with the 
University of Pennsylvania since 1885 and from time 
to time the University has bought rare books on early 
American agriculture for the collection with money 
provided by the Society's Permanent Fund. 

Throughout its history, the Society has been a 
leader in promoting the establishment of other agri- 
cultural societies and public agencies formed for 
education and research. In 1851 its officers and 
members \\ere responsible for the formation of the 
State Agricultural Society which in turn was instru- 
mental in the establishment of the Farmer's High 
School, now the Pennsylvania State University. With- 
out the support and perseverence of members of the 
Philadelphia Society, the organization of this great 
educational institution would never have been com- 
pleted. 

The Pennsyhania Horticultural Society, organ- 
ized in 1827, had as one of its charter members. Dr. 
James Please, an influential and loyal meml>er of the 
Philadelphia Society and its president from 18-14 to 
1846. Other officers whom the t\\o Societies have had 
in common are Nicholas Biddle, who served as Presi- 
dent of the Philadelphia Society from 1831 to 1844 
and Vice President of the Horticultural Society from 
1830 to 1832, and David Landreth v>ho served as 
President of the Philadelphia Society from 1855 
through 1856 and as Vice President of the Horticul- 
tural Society from 1829 to 1836. Throughout the 136 
years of our existence, the two Societies have had 
many mutual members. 



LIBRARY NOTES 

A Place to Live — The United .States Department of 
Agriculture, tor sale by the .Superintendent of 
Documents, Washington, D. C. 20402, price $3.00. 

Although subtitled "The Yearljook of Agriculture 
1963," this is by no means a report on the activities 
of the Department of Agriculture, or even on the 
major problems facing the Department. Instead, the 
purpose is "to inform all Americans aljout the effects 
of urbanization and industrialization on rural America 
and the need for plans and action so that people will 
have a proper place to live." 

The book takes the form of 79 short articles, most 
of them written by analysts, economists, conserva- 
tionists and other specialists associated with the De- 
partment or with other governmental units. Among 
the many topics covered, those receiving the most 
emphasis are the part-time farmer, the rural resident 
who is not a farmer, the farmer and the encroaching 
suburbs, water and air pollution, conservation, recrea- 
tion, open space, and regional planning. 

Regardless of how individual readers may feel as 
to whether such problems are a proper concern for 
the Department of Agriculture, most readers will 
agree that the volume does not provide a satisfactory 
treatment of these problems. Apparently each con- 
tributor was invited to express himself without regard 
to overlapping or contradictions. As a result, the 
articles in the various fields cover the same introduc- 
tory ground over and over again, without progressing 
to more detailed analysis. Thus, there are numerous 
references to conservation easements but no discussion 
of the legal, political and economic problems involved 
in administering them. .Similarly, several of the 
authors extol cluster subdivisions, but only one even 
alludes to the difficulty of maintaining and controlling 
the use of common ground under our system of land 
holding and local government. 

The book is, in fact, a collection of rather bland 
articles, many of which would probably not survive 
scrutiny by the editor of a first-rate periodical of 
general interest. The authors avoid expressions of 
opinion and rely heavily on statistics, which they 
present for the reader to interpret as he chooses. This 
leads occasionally to such trivial speculations as why, 
during the summer of 1%0, 53% of the people more 
than 12 years old and 549^: of metropolitan and rural 
non-farm residents went picnicing, whereas only 48% 
of the rural farm population enjoyed a picnic during 
the same period. 

One further observation may be pertinent to 
The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society. The book 
contains few, if any, references to ornamental horti- 
culture or to the potential contribution of voluntary 
organizations such as the Society to the amenities of 
life. There are, to be sure, two short articles devoted 
specifically to the activities of garden clubs and garden 

(Conf'd last page) 



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PHYTOILLUMINATION-(Cont'd) 

brilliance. Since the lights art burned for fourteen to 
sixteen hours each day, it can be understood why 
experts insist on frequent replacement. 

The Society's library contains a number of books 
and pamphlets which discuss ph_\toilluniination. Some 
of this material has been prepared by the electric 
companies which manufacture fluorescent tubes, and 
some is the result of studies and tests by researchers 
in the USDA and at state universities. There are also 
a number of books written by hobbyists and experts in 
this intriguing method of indoor gardening. 



LILY GROUP TO MEET 

The Middle Atlantic Regional Lily Group will 
meet in the Society rooms on Saturday January 25th 
at 2:00 P.M. Members of the Society who are par- 
ticularly interested in growing lilies are invited to 
attend this meeting. The program will include dis- 
cussion of lily problems and cultural information. 



Register by using the clip-out coupon. Please enclose check anil 
mail to 389 Suburban Station, Phila. 19103. Registrations accepted 
in the order received; confirmation by return post card. 

" — — — — — — — — — — — 1 

GARDEN CLINIC RESERVATION 



n BOTANY FOR GARDENER.S 

Jan. 9, Jan. 16 7:30 P.M. $4.00 

D THE GVRDEN YEAR — PART II 

Jan. 23 7:30 P.M. $2.00 

D PLANNING THE HERBACEOUS BORDER 

(3 sessions) 

Feb. 6, 13. 27 10:30 A.M. $15.00 

n A NURSERYMAN TALKS ABOUT LANDSCAPING 
Feb. 20 7:30 P.M. $2.00 

Name 

Address 

City 

Telephone 



COMING PROGRAMS OF INTEREST 

The Horticultural Coinicil of the Ambler Campus 
of Temple University has extended an invitation to 
the gardening public to attend two illustrated lectures 
of unusual interest which will be part of the Council's 
Annual Forum program. 

On Saturday evening. January 25th at 8:30 P.AL, 
Dr. John ^L Fogg, Jr., Professor of Botany at the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania and Director of the Univer- 
sity's Morris Arboretum will speak on "Exploring 
for Drug Plants." 

At 2 P.M. on Sunday afternoon. Januarj' 26th 
Miss Lynn K. Perry will give an illustrated lecture 
on bonsai, the Jajjanese art of growing miniature 
trees and landscapes. Miss Perry, who studied with 
Mr. Kyuzo iMurata of the Kyuka-en Bonsai Garden 
in Japan, will illustrate her lecture with her own 
color slides. 

Both programs will be held in Bright Hall on 
the Ambler Campus of Temple University located on 
Meeting House Road between Butler Pike and Fort 
Washington Road in Ambler. 



Garden Tip . . . from 

Mrs. James C. Hornor 

Plan ahead for next summer's tomato crop 
and save your old nylon stockings. A further 
tip on using them to tie vines to a support 
or trellis will follow in June. 



LIBRARY NOTES-(Cont'd) 

centers. But the authors who were concerned with 
other subjects appear oblivious to the existence of 
such voluntary organizations. It is clear that horti- 
cultural societies are a long way from achieving the 
recognition which their field of interest deserves. 

F. L. B. 



SOCIETY 



* 1617 PENNSYLVANIA BOULEVARD 

n 

,v PHILADELPHIA 3. PENNSYLVANIA 




VOL V, No. 2 



FEBRUARY, 1964 



Jfreo MAiX^* 



b 



PERENNIALS FOR PLEASURE 



Perennials are apt to be a problem for modern 
gardeners. They are highly recommended by knowl- 
edgeable horticulturists who extol the many species 
and cultivars with distinctive shapes and colors. Yet 
only a few are to be found at most nurseries, and far 
too often these produce unsatisfactory results in the 
home garden. 

The explanation for this unhappy situation is the 
classic vicious circle. Most perennials require a season 
of growth before they look their best. They should 
be planted months before they are expected to produce 
flowers. The gardener should buy them in a dormant 
condition, selecting and placing them on the basis 
of how they will look weeks or months later — not 
how they happen to look at the time of purchase. 
In short, perennials require planning. 

But many gardeners refuse to plan. They wait 
for a nice spring weekend and then attempt to buy 
a border ready made at the nearest roadside stand. 
They pick up petunias and pansies by the flat and 
they expect to buy perennials in the same fashion. 
The proprietors of these stands are scarcely to be 
criticised when they yield to the gardener's demands 
and ofifer the few varieties which can be sold in flower 
— spring blooming phlox, iberis, nepeta and the like. 
From the seller's point of view it is sound business 
to ofifer material for which there is a sure sale and 
which will give a more or less immediate effect. The 
trouble is that this method of selling and buying 
perennials defies all the rules of good gardening and 
limits the selection to a very few fast growing profit- 
able varieties, dooming a large number of desirable 
species to extinction. 

Fortunately both seeds' and stock of some of the 
less popular varieties are still available for gardeners 
who will take the time to plan and plant ahead, and 
there are still nurseries who will grow these plants 
on special order. Of course, perennials require care. 
Despite the name, only a very few can be put in place 
and left alone. Many need dividing every year or 
every two years. Few are free of pests and disease, 
and some of the nicest are not 'completely hardy in 
this climate. Nevertheless, the results are worth the 
trouble. 

The following list has been compiled by experts 
in the Delaware Valley. It is not by any means 
complete, but is presented here with the recommenda- 
tion that our members investigate the possibility of 



using some of these plants in their gardens. All are 
desirable and worth the expense and labor required 
to grow them. If small plants are ordered this year 
and planted in the garden in the spring or in the 
early fall, next year may bring a border of which the 
gardener can be justly proud. 

The Society stafif is prepared to answer members' 
questions about these and other worthwhile herbaceous 
plants and to recommend sources of supply. 
Achillea taygetea (Yarrow). Xeat habit. Soft yellow 
flowers on 18" stems from June to August. Full sun. 
Aconitum carmichaelii (fischeri) (Monkshood) 2j^'-3' 
dark blue flowers in late summer and early fall. Will 
grow in light shade. 

Alyssum saxcUile cv. Silver Queen or A. saxatile cv. 
Citrinum. These low growing plants with soft yellow 
flowers are identical. Bloom in May. 
Amsonia. Seldom grown perennials giving blue flowers 
in May. Will grow in sun or light shade. 

A. montana 12" -15" 

A. tabernaemontana 2^-3'. Pale blue flowers 
Anemone japonica (Japanese anemone). 2' -3', large 
pastel flowers from September to November. W'ill 
grow in light shade. Also recommended : 

cv. Queen Charlotte, pink 

cv. Marie Manchard, white, both semi-double. 
Anemone pulsatiUa (Pasque - Flower) 8" - 10" delicate 
lavender flowers in spring. Full sun and good drain- 
age required. 

AquUegia (columbine). Will grow in light shade or 
full sun. Flowers in May and June. 

cv, Helenae 15" blue and white flowers 

flabellata nana 6" - 8", dwarf white, blue gray 

foliage. 

McKana's giant hybrids. Tall, mixed colors. 
Astilhe X arendsii. 2' -3' feathery flowering spikes in 
June. Will grow in sun or shade, 

cv. Bonn — light pink ; cv. Fanal — dark red ; 

cv. Irrlicht — strong white; cv. Deutschland — 

pure white. 
Aster X frikarti cv. Wonder of Stafifa, One of the 
longest blooming perennials with blue daisj'-like 
flowers from July to frost, 30" tall. Will grow in 
light shade, but best in full sun. 

Baptisia bracteata lyi' high, soft yellow flowers in 
summer. Sun, 

Campanula persicifolia cv. Telham Beauty, Slender 

{Conf'd page two] 



PERENNIALS-(Cont'd) 

growth to 3' with 3" pale blue bells in June. Grow 
in sun or light shade. 

Cimicifuga simplex cv. Armleuchter. Slender 3' flower- 
ing spikes produced in abundance in October. Prefers 
shade. 

Dicentra eximia and its hybrids. (Fringed bleeding 
heart). Provides bloom over a long period. Will grow 
in partial shade. 

Dictamnus albus (gas plant) 3', white, late spring blooms. 
Once established will grow for years. Sun or shade. 
Epimedium X youngianum var. niveum 12", white flowers 
in May, distinctive foliage. Partial shade. 
Filipendula hexapetala var. flore-plena 15" high clusters 
of flowers in July and August, pink in bud, white when 
open. Foliage, low fern-like rosettes. Sun or partial 
shade. 

Hellcborus orientalis (Lenten rose) 12" high, dark pastel 
shades, mostly purple. Very early bloomer. Partial 
shade. 

Hibiscus Super giant 3' to 6', large flowers in shades 
of red, pink and white. Full sun. 

Lythrum virgatum cv. Morden Pink. 3' - 4', spiked pink 
flowers June to September. Vigorous. Sun. 
Linum narbonnense (Blue flax) Lacy foliage and deli- 
cate pale blue flowers from late May through the 
summer. Sun. (Superior to usually grown L. perenne.) 
Kniphofia uvaria (Tritoma) (Torch-lily) Flower stalks 
3' -4', brilliant orange-red, August and September 
blooming. Newer small-flowered cultivars 'Coral Sea' 
(rose) 'Vanilla' (light yellow) bloom in June. Full sun. 
Platycoden grandiflorum var. mariesii (Balloon flower) 
12" - 18" high, blue or white flowers in mid-summer. 
Sun or partial shade. 

Phlox suffruticosa 'Miss Lingard' 2^' to 3' tall, white 
flowers, dark green foliage. First summer phlox to 
bloom, and least susceptible to disease. Full sun. 
Salvia X superba (S. nemorosaj Tall 3' flowers, purple- 
blue with red bracts in June and early July. Full sun. 
Scabiosa caucasica cv. Blue Lady 2', beautiful lavender- 
blue flowers, June to September, cv. Constancy, 
amethyst flowers. Full sun. Likes lime. 
Stokesia laevis (Stoke's aster) 12" -24" high, huge blue 
or white flowers in July and August. Full sun. Rec- 
ommended : cv. Silver Moon and cv. Blue Danube. 
Thalictrum rochebrunianum cv. Lavender Mist. Maiden- 
hair-like foliage, lavender flowers with yellow stamens 
on stalks 4' - 5' tall in August. Sun. 
Thermopsis caroliniana. Tall with yellow lupine-like 
flowers in June. Full sun. 

Verbascum X Yellow Queen. Not to be confused with 
biennial forms, 4' tall with stalks of pale yellow- 
flowers in June and early July. 

Veronica (Speedwell). Many are desirable. Flowers 
appear in spikes of blue, white, pink and lavender 
from June through August. Especially recommended 
are V. spuria, {V. amethystina) 'Royal Blue,' and V. 
longifolia (maritima) var. subsessilis. 
Viola cornuta 'Royal Purple, Vigorous plant with purple 
flowers on 12" stems. Partial shade. Spring flowering. 
Viola odorata 'Rosina' (Sweet Violet) Blooms in spring 
and often again in late summer, Pink flowers. Shade. 



OLD PHILADELPHIA TO BE THEME OF 
1964 PHILADELPHIA FLOWER SHOW 

The facade of the headquarters of the Pennsyl- 
vania Horticultural Society will be the central feature 
of the 1964 Philadelphia Flower Show, which will 
open at noon on Sunday, March 8, and continue 
through Saturday, March 14, at the Trade and Con- 
vention Center. Many of the gardens and displays 
on the main aisle will reflect the 18th century colonial 
atmosphere of the buildings now under reconstruction 
in the Independence National Historical Park. Trees, 
shrubs and flowers appropriate to the streets and 
gardens of old Philadelphia will predominate. 

The Society's section of the Show is expected to 
emphasize the same theme in the competitive classes 
and niches. There will be two classes calling for a 
section of a garden (one in the city, the other in the 
country) showing imaginative use of steps. In addi- 
tion there will be thirty-two horticultural classes. 

In the educational field, the Ambler Campus of 
Temple University will present an exhibit titled 
"Garden Plants from Seed to Flower." A children's 
garden and an exhibition of tropical fish and plants 
suitable for home aquariums will provide valuable 
ideas and information to visitors. Members of the 
Garden Club of America will stage a comprehensive 
exhibit on conservation. 

Entries are now being received for all classes. 
The deadline for entries is Monday, February 24. 
Additional information and extra copies of the sched- 
ule may be obtained from the Society office. Mrs. 
Evelyn Hett, horticultural secretary, is in charge of 
all details pertaining to the smooth running of the 
Show. She will be glad to answer questions and help 
members and exhibitors in everj' way possible. 



MRS. ALUNSON HONORED 

Mrs. E. Page Allinson, Vice President of the 
Pennsylvania Horticultural Society has received the 
Outstanding Service Award of the William Penn 
Chapter, Soil Conservation Society of America. The 
award was presented "for devoted service to the cause 
of conservation by words and actions." 

The award was well deserved. Mrs. Allinson's list 
of jobs done and positions held is impressive, and 
the Society counts itself among those fortunate organi- 
zations to which she has given her interest and 
support. 

Mrs. Allinson was one of the Founders of the 
Brandywine Valley Association and is presently its 
President. She has served as Conservation Chairman 
of the National Council of State Garden Clubs and 
of the Garden Club Federation of Pennsylvania and 
has been on the Board of Directors of the Garden 
Club of America. She is Chairman of the Conserva- 
tion Workshop Committee, which provides scholar- 
ships for teachers at the Conservation Workshop at 
the West Chester State College, and she has been 
active on the Pennsylvania Roadside Council, 



d 



LIBRARY NOTES 

The 1964 nursery catalogs are off the press. You 
will see them advertised, mostly free upon request, in 
gardening magazines and in the garden sections of 
many newspapers. These catalogs are as much a part 
of the gardener's library as his garden handbooks, 
encyclopedia.* and favorite garden journals. 

It should be kept in mind that these catalogs are 
selling documents and not gardening manuals, al- 
though some nurseries go beyond the usual plant 
description and price lists to include cultural data. 
Their purpose is to increase the nursery's sales of 
plentiful stock, not to help the individual gardener 
with his special problem. They supplement rather 
than replace the true gardening text. 

Some catalogs are profusely illustrated. A few 
nurseries offer colorful brochures, complete with bo- 
tanical names as well as clear photographs or line 
drawings. Because of the expense of publication, these 
catalogs often cost a small fee (10c to $1.00), which 
is deducted from the customer's first order. Even if 
it is inconvenient to patronize the nurseries responsible 
for such attractive and inclusive brochures, they are 
often excellent references for plant identification and 
variety names. 

The seasoned gardener has a few favorite nurseries. 
His name is on their regular mailing lists so that 
each year he receives their new catalogs and notices 
of special sales. He avoids catalogs that lay traps 
for the unwary by offering fantastic savings and 
describing every plant in superlatives. 

Nurseries that do not solicit mail-order business 
may nevertheless maintain lists of local customers to 
whom they send notices of sales and seasonal special- 
ties. Despite their simplicity, these notices should not 
be passed over in favor of more expensive advertising. 
Local nurseries can supply fresh plant material, not 
damaged by long distance shipping. They give the 
gardener the welcome opportunity of making his own 
selection. 

The Society maintains a substantial collection of 
catalogs, which, although by no means complete, is 
representative of seed companies and plant specialists 
from both the United States and abroad. Members 
are welcome to use these catalogs and to ask the librar- 
ian for help in selecting those best suited for their 
purpose. 



A Gardener's Book of Plant Names 
By A. W. Smith 

Harper and Row, 1963, 428 pp. $5.95. 

Plant names come from many sources, and the study of 
their origins and definitions is both interesting and helpful. 
There are old books on this subject and in recent years there 
have been many short articles, but Mr. Smith has given us an 
up-to-date book, full of facts that would be very difficult to 
find elsewhere. 

An introduction dealing with the history of plant nomeri- 
clature, rules for pronunciation, etc., is followed by three divi- 
sions — The first is a brief list of botanical terms. The second, 
which is the bulk of the book, is an alphabetical list of the 
names of plants (genus) and of adjectives by which they are 
described (species). The third is merely common names listed 
opposite those of the genus. 

Part two of the three mentioned above is entitled "Mean- 
ings and Origins of Names." The name of the genus is 
capitalized and both definition and derivation are given. Often 



there are brief descriptions of the history, discovery or uses of 
the plants, and sometimes biographical items concerning the 
discoverer, or the man for whom the plant was named. These 
short accounts, which reflect a vast amount of research, are 
of very great interest. The species names, given in the same 
type (non-capitalized) are defined, but origins are not given. 
Here there is some repetition and lack of consistency. 

It is unfortunate that the introduction does not give a 
more detailed and accurate account of the binomial nomen- 
clature and of the intricate process of naming a new plant. 
These are, however, minor flaws in a book that is full of wde- 
ranging and fascinating information. 

Emily Read Cheston 
« « * 

Jane Colden, 1724-1766. Botanic Manuscript. Edited by; 

H. W. Rickett and Elizabeth C. Hall. Garden Club of 

Orang*; and Dutchess Counties, New York. 1963 - $10.00. 

"I thought that botany is an amusement which may be 
made agreeable to the ladies, who are often at a loss lo fill 
up their time." 

This quotation from Jane Colden's father (page 22) carries 
the message of this enjoyable book. Delving into the world 
of botany for pure pleasure and mental stimulation was an 
engrossing and richly rewarding pastime for Jane Colden. 

This "amusement," which Jane Colden did so well and 
with such obvious pleasure, any woman can do. Here is a 
hobby to stimulate mental processes which many of us may 
not have kept too well dusted since school days. 

Today, as in 1755, the hurdle of mastering the technical 
terms is still with us, but in a much lesser degree, for there 
are excellent, easy to use, wild-fiower books in every book store. 

Using the barest minimum of "botanical terms," Jane 
Colden wrote lucid descriptions, clear to both botanist and 
layman. "Footstalk" serves equally well for pedicel or petiole 
and "small lancet shaped leaf at the bottom of every foot- 
stalk" is clearly a bract. 

Although her drawings lack the charm and comprehen- 
siveness of her words, her keen sense of observation and 
choice of descriptive terms make the book a pleasure to read. 

Ruth McV. Allen 



Recent Acquisitions 

Gardening, Forcing, Conditioning and Drying for Flower 

Arrangements by Arno and Irene Nehrling. 
Japanese Flower Arrangement by Ellen G. Allen. 
Handbook of Wildflower Cultivation by Kathryn S. Taylor 

and Stephen F. Hamblin. 
The Shrub Identification Book by George W. D. Symonds. 
Nature, Art and Flower Arrangement by Emma H. Cyphers. 
Beckoning Desert by Edward Maddin Ainsworth. 
World Provider: the Story of Grass by Sarah R. Riedman. 
Photographing Your Flowers by John P. and Mary Alice 

Roche. 
Soil Fertility and Fertilizers by Samuel L. Tisdale and Werner 

L. Nelson. 
A Place to Live, U. S. Dept. of Agriculture Year Book. 1963. 
Philadelphia Society for Promoting Agriculture by Stevenson 

VV. Fletcher. 
Garden Design; The Principles of Abstract Design as applied 

to Landscape Composition by Marjorie S. Cantley, 
U. C. System for Producing Healthy Container-Grown Plants. 

Edited by Kenneth F. Baker. 
Introductory Horticulture by Everett P. Christopher. 
An Easy Guide to Japanese Flower Arrangement Styles by 

Lida Webb. 
Light and Plant Growth by R. van der \'een and G. Meijer. 
Things We see: Gardens by Lady Allen of Hurtwood and 

Susan Jellicoe. 
The Forest and the Sea bv Marston Bates. 
The Quiet Crises by Stewart L. Udall. 
Space Time and Architecture by Sigfried Giedion. 
Vision in Motion by L. Moholy-Nagy. 

Carolina Low Country Impressions by .Mexander Sprunt. Jr. 
Man-Made America by Christopher Tunnard and Boris Push- 

Isanev. 
Man in Nature by Marston Bates. 

Scientists Who Work Outdoors by Poole, Lynn and Gray. 
The Mind as Nature by Loren Eiseley. 
New Gardens by Ernst Baumann. 
Sander's Encyclopedia of Gardening — Revised by A. C. L. 

Hellyer. 
Blumenfenster by Paulhans Peters. 

Conservationists and What They Do bv C. William Harrison. 
The World Book of House Plants by Elvin McDonald. 
Reading the Landscape by May Theilgard Watts. 



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MEMBER'S EVENING 

A panel of experts will give information and 
advice to members on the evening of Tuesday, Feb- 
ruary 4. While each participant has been asked to 
discuss a specific subject, all are experienced horticul- 
turists and have agreed to answer questions and make 
comments on ideas put forth by the audience, other 
panel members, and the moderator. The panelists 
are as follows : 

Mrs. Edward J. Garra, garden consultant and 

lecturer. 
Mrs. Alfred S. Martin, formerly staff horticulturist 
with the Society and a member of the Plant 
Propagator's Society of America. 
William H. White. Philadelphia county agent. 
John C. Swartley, Chairman, Department of Hor- 
ticulture, Ambler Campus — Temple Univer- 
sity and partner, Bready and Swartley, Inc., 
landscape contractors. 
Moderator. Ernesta D. Ballard. Executive Secre- 
tary, Pennsylvania Horticultural Society. 



Register by using the clip-out coupon. Please enclose check and 
mail to 389 Suburban Station, Phila. 19103. Registrations accepted 
in the order received; confirmation by return post card. 

GARDEN CLINIC RESERVATION 



n PLANNING THE HERBACEOUS BORDER 
<3 sessions) 
Feb. 6, 13, 27 10:30 A.M. $15.00 

n A NURSERYMAN TALKS ABOUT LANDSCAPING 
Feb. 20 7:30 P.M. $2.00 

D THE GARDEN YEAR - PART III 

March 24 10:30 A.M. J2.00 

D ROSES - PART I 

March 31 7:30 P.M. $2.00 

Name 



Address . . 

City 

Telephone 



GARDEN CLINICS 

THE GARDEN YEAR, PART III 

This is the third of a series of clinics on seasonal 
garden activities — the season to be discussed being 
spring. The discussion will include preparing the soil, 
sowing seeds — both indoors and out — dividing 
perennials, composting and mulching, and caring for 
both new and established plants. Instructor: Mrs. 
Edward J. Garra. Society rooms, Tuesday morning, 
March 24, 10:30 A.M. Fee: $2.50. 



CULTURE OF ROSES 

This clinic is intended to teach gardeners how 
to grow healthy rose plants and produce roses. It 
will cover planting procedures, pruning, and fertiliz- 
ing, and will include roses for landscaping as well as 
those grown for show and cutting. 

The clinic instructor will be Richard Thomson, 
a recognized rose expert and author of Old Roses for 
Modern Gardens. The participants will be invited to 
visit Mr. Thomson's rose garden when it is at its 
prime in early summer. Society rooms, Tuesday 
evening. March 31, 7:30 P.M. Fee: $2.00. 



WILLIAMSBURG SYMPOSIUM 

The Society's Executive Secretary, Ernesta 
Drinker Ballard, will be one of the speakers at the 
\\'illiamsburg Garden Symposium this spring, March 
15 to March 20. The Symposium, which includes talks 
by outstanding horticulturists and landscape design 
specialists, is sponsored annually by Colonial Wil- 
liamsburg and Flower Grower Magazine. 

Anyone may attend the week-long program. For 
more information you may either call the Society or 
write directly to the Symposium's registrar in Wil- 
liamsburg, Virginia. 



THE PENNSYLVANIA 



HORTICULTURAL 



SOCIETY 



1617 PENNSYLVANlXlbUL^XTO" 
PHILADELPHIA 3, PENNSYLVANIA 



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VOL V. No. 3 



MARCH. 1964 



ffO MAI><^*^ 



I 



QUARANTINE 37 - AN IMPORTANT SAFEGUARD 



Part of the fun of traveling is bringing back 
•mementos from places visited. For many of us, this 
means the plants we admired and longed to try at 
home. How many gardeners do you know who have 
something in their garden or greenhouse which they 
smuggled past the customs inspector — something 
special, easily propagated and simple to conceal? 
The temptation to smuggle is almost irresistable, but 
we really must not do it. It is against the law to 
import plant material from foreign countries without 
a permit and without inspection by the United States 
Department of Agriculture. The prohibition applies 
to seeds, cuttings, established plants and bulbs. 

The reasons for the law — which is known as 
Quarantine 37 — are obvious. We already have enough 
destructive pests, and the introduction of any more 
must be prevented. The insects and diseases from 
foreign lands which became established here before 
the enactment of Quarantine 37 have cost us millions 
of dollars in crop loss, prevention and control. The 
list includes Japanese beetle, chestnut blight, Dutch 
elm disease, gypsy moth, oriental fruit fly and scores 
of others. All comparatively harmless in their native 
habitat, but deadly in the American environment. 

People who grow plants for pleasure would not 
purposely introduce or spread a pest. The smugglers 
honestly believe that the seeds they put in their pill 
box and the cuttings they add to the floral bouquet in 
their hats are uncontaminated. But, an hour or two 
at the USDA's Plant Quarantine Division, 209 River 
Street, Hoboken, New Jersey, would open their eyes 
and change their minds. Mr. E. A. Burns, head of 
the Permit Section there can recount many instances 
where he and his staff have intercepted destructive 
insect larvae from the tropics, eggs of the golden 
nematode from Europe and the microscopic begin- 
nings of hitherto unknown diseases. Particularly 
troublesome pests of late have been the eggs of num- 
erous species of land snails, identical in size, color, 
and shape to certain species of seed. 

What, then, are the rules, and how should garden- 
ers go about procuring the things they see abroad 
for their gardens at home? The first thing to remem- 
ber is that many of the plants being cultivated in 
gardens all over the world can be bought from nur- 
serymen in the United States. A search of catalogs 
from the appropriate section of the country will 
often solve the problem. 



If the species is not available domestically, the 
next best solution is to find a foreign nurseryman 
who handles it. From such a source it can usually be 
safely and properly imported into this country. The 
first step then, is to write to Hoboken and ask for 
circulars Q37 - 1, 2, 4 and 10 and any others that are 
applicable. These include complete instructions for 
obtaining an import permit together with instructions 
for the importer. For example, plants must be free 
of sand and soil and must be wrapped in approved 
packing material. 

The circulars also list a number of plants which 
cannot be imported from certain countries under any 
circumstances (cactus, for instance, because of a par- 
ticularly pernicious borer.) There are others that 
can be imported only under a post-entry quarantine. 

All plant material imported under any procedure 
is subject to inspection by the USDA in cooperation 
with the U.S. Custom Service. Inspection stations 
are located at Hoboken, Miami, New Orleans, Browns- 
ville and Laredo, Texas, San Francisco and San Pedro, 
California, Seattle, Honolulu and San Juan, Puerto 
Rico. 

Don't try to carry your plant material through 
the import procedures. The rules require that the 
material be transported from the point of entry to 
inspection stations by bonded carrier, and this is 
sometimes difficult for the uninitiated to arrange. 
The simple solution is the mails — airmail is best of 
all. When plants are shipped into the country by 
mail under proper ])ermit the post office takes respon- 
sil:)ility for getting them through customs and deliver- 
ing them to the addressee. 

Criticism of the handling and procedures at the 
quarantine divisions runs high. Again, a visit to 
Hoboken may convince a skeptical importer of the 
conscientious care and treatment given every ship- 
ment. Plants that arrive properly packed and in good 
health are inspected, fumigated or treated as neces- 
sary, repacked and sent on their way with reasonable 
speed. Casualties are almost always the result of 
sloppy packing, and not the effects of treatment 
received at the Division. 

If you believe that some of these procedures are 
unduly cumbersome or unwarranted, the solution is 
not to ignore them, but to work for their improvement. 
Laws can be amended if enough citizens want it. 

(Cont'd page two) 



FROM THE PRESIDENT . . . 

We have begun a three-year campaign to increase 
the Society's endowment funds, the first such drive 
in our recent history. Though we are proceeding 
without high pressure and professional guidance, I 
have no doubt that we will achieve our goal. And 
I have not the slightest doubt that the role we will 
be playing in the future will be very much greater 
than is now generally imagined. The sooner we see 
the possibilities ahead, the sooner we will reach this 
goal and be able to fulfill our larger destiny. 

No organization such as ours is any stronger 
than the endowment funds which provide the perma- 
nent foundation of its services and activities ; and 
none is stronger than the support of its members. 
We are rich in the latter respect ; financially, we 
have been too long living in a "margin of terror." 
We have performed with distinction, so the phrase 
seems exaggerated. But it has validity when we begin 
to appreciate our inability to seize the opportunities 
for growth that are before us. 

To achieve a positive attitude toward the cam- 
paign and our future, we need, I think, to dispel 
certain doubts about raising these funds. We can 
best answer the doubts by answering this basic 
question. Is $500,000 in three years too high a target? 
It is both modest and reasonable if you relate it to 
the many millions of dollars raised annually for 
charitable institutions. This sum is to add approxi- 
mately $20,000 to our income. It makes possible 
additions to our stafl^, programs and services on a 
sound and perpetual basis which will enormously 
increase our effectiveness. Is endowing to high stand- 
ards and their promulgation in the broad field of 
horticulture unreasonable or frivolous in the face of 
multiple demands from hospitals, the United Fund, 
for the battling of disease and poverty? 

Another inhibiting fact is that most of us have 
established patterns of giving to charities. Their needs 
are so clear and insistent that many do not react 
seriously to anything but the direst necessities over 
and above continuing support of their favored organi- 
zations. As a result, we tend to neglect those which 
contribute to the values of living, the very things 
we would most like to support. In horticulture, in its 
broadest sense, nature, science, and art converge. It 
is a legitimate and important part of our culture. If 
through stronger and more far-reaching programs 
we can bring to more people more knowledge, more 
education, more participation and appreciation of 
nature, science and art through horticulture, our goals 
take on genuine significance. 

Because we have been limited in finances, staff, 
programs and headquarters, the general public has. 
at best, a limited knowledge of our functions. We 
have, for example, done nothing in the field of con- 
servation and but little in public service. We have 
not done nearly enough with and for garden clubs 
and plant societies. Many hundreds of our members 
have only the vaguest concept of the range of our 
existing programs. More members and more "public 
relations" will help, but will not suffice. Does all 
this mean, then, that we must depend upon the 



exceptional vision and generosity of a few individuals 
to insure our future? Definitely not. The support of 
our membership is vital, through planned contribu- 
tions, each according to ability, and through the 
stirring up of enthusiasm for fulfillment of our poten- 
tial and understanding of its significance to the 
community. 

It is true that horticulture is not for everybody. 
But, it is also true that in horticulture, if each but 
knew it, there is something for everybody. Even 
the mildly interested will agree that plastic flowers 
are no substitute for the real thing; that treeless 
supermarket lots and look-alike housing developments 
should not replace green spaces ; that horticultural 
standards should not be debased for the sake of easier 
commercialization, and that, without strong leadership, 
we will only see more of all this, rapidly. There is a 
clear and present need to give new meaning to that 
appealing old description "Penn's Greene Towne." 

So our future is not just a new headquarters. 
Our endowment drive has implications for the entire 
community. There is no valid reason why, with 
increasing opportunities to render effective service, we 
should not accept the challenges of growth. And there 
is no valid reason to doubt the response of our mem- 
bers and friends. Broader programs reaching through- 
out the Delaware Valley so as to make continuous 
and vital contributions to our members and the whole 
community will bring to each of us new pleasures 
and renewed pride in the nation's oldest Horticultural 
Society. 

R. Gwynne Stout 



"Gardening cannot stand still. Gardeners 
should endeavor to understand better the type of 
climate in which they live, and the type of soil 
in which they work. It is easier to have good 
gardens by working with nature and growing plants 
adapted to soil and climate than to fight nature 
by trying to' grow those that cannot be made to 
thrive without the use of exceptional ability and 
energy." 

John C. Wister 
The Woman's Home Companion Garden Book 



QUARANTINE 37-(Cont'd) 

Moreover, the Department of Agriculture has the 
power under existing law to modify the quarantine 
and import regulations. An example is the special 
regulation for the importation of dwarf trees from 
Japan. Ordinarily, trees and shrubs which are ad- 
missible must be not more than two years old, which, 
of course, would eliminate anj' bonsai worthy of the 
name. If organizations like the Pennsylvania Horti- 
cultural Society agree that other changes are desirable, 
they should work together toward that end. 



LIBRARY NOTES 

The Society subscribes to some 100 periodicals, 
professional and trade publications, bulletins and 
popular magazines. These cannot be circulated, but 
members and friends are invited to come into the 
library and read them at any time. Some articles of 
exceptional interest which have appeared during the 
last six weeks are listed below. Thermofax copies 
of these and any others, made by our new and greatly 
improved machine, are available on request. Call 
Miss Urian, LO 3-8352 or LO 3-7185. 

John T. Warren, N.D.H., "Foliage Plants in the 
Greenhouse," Gardeners Chronicle Gardening Illus- 
trated, (January 4, 1964) 

James S. Wells, "Plant Propagators Discuss 
Methods Old and New," American Nurseryman, (Jan- 
uary 15, 1964) 

"Soil — How it Works," American Rose Magazine, 
Reprinted from Kingwood Center Notes, Vol. X, No. 
3, (March, 1963) 

Donald Wyman, "Tree Trunks" Arnoldia, Vol. 
23, Numbers 11-12, (December 13, 1963) 

"Extra Special — Plants in Pots," Flower and 
Garden, (February, 1964) 

"Planting Time," Gardeners Chronicle Gardening 
Illustrated, Vol. 154, No. 24, (December 14, 1963) 

W. R. Jenkins, C. M. Heald, Jr. & W. W. Os- 
borne, "Nematodes Serious Problem to Growers of 
Ornamentals," July - August New Jersey Agriculture, 
Vol. 45, No. 4 

Richard Langfelder, "Notes on Cold Frame 
Sashes," Bulletin of the American Rock Garden 
Society, Vol. 32, No. 1 

Will Ingwersen, "Old Friends," Gardeners Chron- 
icle Gardening Illustrated, (November 2, 1%3) 

Betty Brinhart, "Celery," Park's Floral Magazine, 
(February, 1964) 

Louis M. Vasvary, "Questions and Answers 
About Dormant Sprays," Flower Grower, (February, 

1964) 

* * * 

The quiet crisis, by Stewart L. Udall, New York, 

Holt, Rinehart & Winston. 1963, 196 pp. $5.00. 

This is a quiet book. Without fanaticism, or even 
emotion, Mr. Udall, Secretary of the Interior, has 
written a thoroughly researched, yet eminently read- 
able account of the history of the "Myth of Super- 
abundance," how it came to be, how its devotees 
wasted the immense natural resources of the United 
States, and how individuals and organizations have 
tried to prevent and repair such destruction. Even 
devoted conservationists will be surprised to learn 
how early a few men recognized the errors practiced 
in lumbering, mining and agriculture. For instance, 
contour plowing was urged as early as 1800. 

In covering so great a field in so small a compass, 
occasional oversimplification is inevitable. However, 
an excellent series of notes on sources can lead the 
interested reader to more detailed information. 

Physically this is a well made book, beautifully 
illustrated, fully indexed, a pleasure to handle and 
to read. 

May T. Drew 



The city gardener by Philip Truex, Alfred A. Knopf, 

New York, 1964, $6.95. 

Last summer I read an enjoyable article entitled 
"Backyards for Birds," an excerpt from The city 
gardener prior to its publication. The suggestions 
of plants, and birds attracted to each, were at once 
choice and prodigious. The completed book is literally 
crammed with detailed information about the garden 
areas found attached to city dwellings. The anecdotes 
throughout the text are valuable, and the experienced 
knowledge of the author who has his own garden in 
New York City, and who has planned and planted 
gardens for many other urban gardeners is convincing. 
The index makes it comparatively easy to return to 
particular ideas and suggestions. The illustrations 
are unfortunately small, but otherwise this is an out- 
standing and delightfully-written handbook for those 
confronted with the opportunities of city gardening. 

N. G. U. 

FREE SEEDS AVAILABLE 

The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society is a sus- 
taining member of the American Horticultural Society 
— an organization of plant societies, garden clubs, 
trade and professional associations and individual 
members. The purpose of the AHS is to "accumulate, 
increase and disseminate horticultural information." 

To these ends, the Society publishes a quarterly 
Bulletin containing original articles of exceptional 
interest and conducts an annual congress. 

One of the privileges of membership in the AHS 
is the opportunity to share in its annual seed distribu- 
tion. The list of over one hundred species is available 
to our members. Anyone wishing to see the list and 
to place an order for free seeds may contact the office. 
(LO 3-8352) 



1964 REGIONAL DAFFODIL SHOW 

The Society is planning an impressive Daflfodil 
Show to be held April 24 and 25 in the Commercial 
Museum. Held in cooperation with the American 
Daffodil Society, Inc. and with seventeen local garden 
clubs acting as sponsors, the show will be both 
educational and entertaining. 

The horticultural divisions of the show will in- 
clude both specimens and collections exhibited by 
competitors from a five-state area. Six arrangement 
classes titled "Poetic Interpretations" will feature 
spring flowers and daffodils. 

As an added attraction, The Show Committee, 
headed by Mrs. Joseph B. Townsend, Jr. has arranged 
for two special programs on Friday. April 24 to be 
held in the Extension Room of the Museum. At 
2 P.M. Anne Wertsner Wood, (Mrs. Harry Wood) 
will speak on "Spring Arrangements Featuring Daffo- 
dils." At 8 P.M. Carlton B. Lees, Executive Secretary 
of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society and for- 
merly Executive Director of the Pennsylvania Horti- 
cultural Society will speak on "Daffodils in the 
Landscape." 

Schedules are available in the office. 





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MEMBERS' EVENING 

On March 3, Cornelius Ackerson, Past President 
of the National Chrysanthemum Society, Inc., U.S.A. 
and presently Editor of the National Chrysanthemum 
Society Bulletin will speak on "Chrysanthemum Ex- 
hibitions and Places of Interest in Japan." Mr. Acker- 
son, an accomplished photographer and experienced 
horticulturist has made two recent trips to the orient 
in which he studied the intricate methods used by 
the Japanese in the culture of their national flower. 

Mr. Ackerson is the author of "The Complete 
Book of Chrysanthemums" and is a director of the 
American Gloxinia Society, Inc. His own greenhouse, 
which consists of a series of small glass and plastic 
enclosures in which various temperatures are main- 
tained, is full of well-grown plants of many genera, 
including gesneriads, orchids and, of course, chrysan- 
themums. 



Register by using the clip-out coupon. Please enclose check and 
mail to 389 Suburban Station, Phila. 19103. Registrations accepted 
in the order received; confirmation by return post card. 



GARDEN CLINIC RESERVATION 

n THE GARDEN YEAR - PART III 

March 24 10:30 A.M. $2.00 

D ROSES - PART I 

March 31 7:30 P.M. J2.00 

D RHODODENDRONS AND AZALEAS 

April 8 7:30 P.M. $2.00 

n BONSAI 

April 21 1:30 P.M. $8.00 

Name 

Address 

City 

Telephone 



-\ 



GARDEN CLINICS 

RHODODENDRONS AND AZALEAS 

On April 8, members will have the opportunity 
to learn all about the culture of rhododendrons : plant- 
ing, soil requirements, desirable exposures, winter 
protection and pruning. Also covered will be methods 
of propagation, care of young plants and recommended 
varieties for this area. Instructor: Mary Milton Mar- 
tin, Society rooms, Wednesday, April 8, 7:30 P.M. 
Fee: $2.00. 



BONSAI 

On Tuesday, April 21, Mrs. Ballard will conduct 
another of her popular bonsai clinics. Each registered 
member will receive a plant to prune, wire and plant 
in a bonsai pot. The clinic will be held at Mrs. 
Ballard's house in Chestnut Hill at 1 :30 P.M. Fee, 
including materials, $8.00. 



NEW TELEPHONE LINE 

We know that many of our members have 
been frustrated and annoyed by our over-busy 
telephone. Things are better now that an additional 
line has been installed. The number is LO 3-7185. 
Our other number is LO 3-8352. 



LANDSCAPE DESIGN SCHOOL, COURSE IV 

Sponsored jointly by the Pennsylvania Horticul- 
tural Society and the Garden Club Federation of 
Pennsylvania, this final session of a comprehensive 
course will cover conservation, evaluation of design 
and the use and maintenance of herbaceous material. 
The dates: April IS, 16, and 17. Programs and regis 
tration blanks are available at the office. 



J 



SOCIET' 



(7 PENNSYLVXfilAl^ULEVARD 
jILADELPHIA 3. PENNSYLVANIA 




VOL V, No. 4 



JfrcD M*I>t# 



THE SOCIETY'S RELATIONSHIP TO GARDEN CLUBS 

AND PLANT SOCIETIES 

by R. Gwynne Stout, President 



While it is true that many members of garden 
clubs are today amongst the most dedicated, informed 
and useful members of the Society, it is also true that 
a very large number of individuals who belong to 
garden clubs are not members of the Society. To an 
even greater degree this is true of plant societies. 

The reasons for this condition are worth analyz- 
ing. It is obvious that dual membership, i.e., member- 
ship in both a garden club or plant society and The 
Pennsylvania Horticultural Society depends upon the 
depth of interest of the individual and the desire to 
support the Society's programs and services. Some 
feel that they get all they want from their clubs 
and that the Society is outside the limits of their 
interests, their time, and their budgets. 

What should be understood is that there is neither 
conflict nor competition between us. Most garden 
clubs have active and diversified programs, as well 
as individual members who are experts in their fields. 
Their success is largely due to the fact that enthusiasm 
and knowledge are easily generated amongst friends, 
groups of individuals who know each other well and 
enjoy working together, the young and relatively in- 
experienced learning from the older members with 
proven abilities. Plant societies, on the other hand, 
are often organized on a national basis, to provide 
knowledge and stimulate interest in a single specialty ; 
and their members of widely diversified backgrounds 
are looking for guidance and new ideas only in this 
specialty, while other horticultural interests are peri- 
pheral or non-existent. 

Where does the Society fit in this picture? It 
should complement and reinforce the interests of clubs 
and plant societies, its ultimate goal, in every case, 
being to make each one more effective in its own right. 
Because of staff and financial limitations, we have 
not done nearly enough along these lines. Thinking 
be\'ond existing relationships, it seems to me that 
several things are possible. First, the Society should 
function as a catalyst in drawing together groups with 
common interests. This can be done in a number of 
ways. I cite some of these ]:)Ossibilities, but am sure 
each of vou can envision more. We welcome new 



ideas, and are planning discussions with organization 
officials along these lines. 

1. In our new headquarters it will be possible 
for groups with common interests to meet in pleasant 
surroundings. Here we will have space for demon- 
strations, panel discussions, shows, colored slides and 
movies, and even facilities for luncheons and dinners. 

2. With our new card filing system to identify 
the particular interests of all our members, it will 
be possible to design activities and services directly 
for their pleasure and interest. Similarly, special mail- 
ings can be targeted to these groups — scheduling 
activities, book reviews, cultural data, new species, 
etc. — without wasting postage and effort on the 
entire membership. 

3. Many of our existing programs and services 
such as lectures and clinics can be taken directly to 
the clubs and plant societies, and many new programs 
can be tailored to their needs. 

4. If we get our "Gardenmobile" the above 
possibilities will be greatly enlarged. This mobile 
demonstration bus could carry plant collections, 
demonstration equipment and staff experts to any 
meeting place, public or private, and could be an 
interesting adjunct to local shows. 

5. We now have funds to spend on shows other 
than the Philadelphia Flower Show. I believe that 
we will be able to give valuable help in staging, 
providing background equipment and containers, plan- 
ning and programing local shows of plant societies, 
garden clubs and other organizations. Some of these 
shows will be in our own headquarters. In any case, 
our hope would be to raise the standards and taste of 
"showmanship," as well as to relieve these groups 
of the organizational and financial burdens always 
involved. 

6. We are giving consideration to revision of 
our categories of membership to include some form 
of club membership which, in return for a reasonable 
contribution, would provide sj^ecial privileges and 
services. We will always hope fur the support of 

(Cont'd page two) 



"Garden" is a word which means something 
different to everyone. To the horticulturist it is a 
place for growing plants; to the poet it suggests 
seclusion, rest, meditation, or perhaps gaiety; to 
the landscape architect it is a definite unit of 
design with certain aesthetic and utilitarian 
junctions. 

Garden design illustrated — 

by John A. & Carol L. Grant 



TREES - A BRIEF GUIDE FOR BUYERS 

Do you plan to buy a tree this spring? The list 
to choose from is quite long and the novice horti- 
culturist may well be confused. Two points should 
be kept in mind in making your selection. 

1. Do not buy just because you have read about a 
certain variety of crabapple or hawthorne, or because 
you saw an exotic species in an arboretum. Buy 
rather because you need a tree to perform a function 
or carry out a landscape plan, to cast shade on a 
certain part of the lawn, to replace a dead tree, to 
give scale to a plan, or for some other architectural 
reason. 

2. Remember that very few trees are either inter- 
esting or beautiful when they are small. From the 
point of view of aesthetics, it is questionable economy 
to landscape with do-it-yourself sizes of trees. By all 
means plant your own shrubs, but, if at all possible, 
leave tree planting to the professionals. One good 
sized tree, which may cost as much as $150 planted, 
will in most cases do far more for a garden than ten 
$15 trees. 

Keeping these points in mind, let us divide trees 
suitable for suburban planting into three rather gen- 
eral categories and make some suggestions for selec- 
tion among them. (There are many desirable trees ; 
only a few are listed.) 

SHADE TREES 

These, of course, must be BIG to do the job. 
Some research into the growth rate of the tree you 
buy may help in the ultimate selection. For example : 
silver maples, (which we hesitate to recommend) 
grow very fast and reach maturity in twenty years, 
while oaks, one of which we list here, grow com- 
paratively slowly. 

Acer saccharum. Sugar maple. To 100' — Spectacular 
fall coloring. 

Quercus phellos. Willow oak. To 50 — Fine textured 
foliage. 

Tilia cordala. Little-leaf linden. To 90' — Slow growing. 

Ulmus parvifolia, Chinese elm. To 50 — Pest and disease 
resistant. 

CercidiphyUum japonicum, Katsura tree. To 75 — Wide, 
spreading haliit. 

Sophora juponica. Ja|)anese pagoda tree. To 75' — Sum- 
mer flowering. 



Gleditsia "Moraine," Thornless honey-locust. To 100 — 
Light, airy shade. 

FLOWERING TREES 

These are desirable because they bear showy 
yellow, pink or white flowers and, in some cases, 
brightly colored fruit. If you carefully compare the 
available specimens in the nursery sales yard or row, 
you can select one with a well sculptured branching 
structure. This quality will increase your enjoyment 
of the tree, particularly in the winter months. 
Cornus florida. Flowering dogwood. To 35' 

Always a favorite. 

Icoelreuteria pnniculala. Golden rain tree. To 30' 
Yellow flowers in summer. 

Magnolia stellata. Star magnolia. To 20' 

Very early blooming. Attractive fall coloring. 

Malus sp.. Flowering crabapple. To 30' (iVIany choice 
varieties.) 

Stewartia pseudo-camellia. Japanese stewartia. To 45 
Summer blooming. Interesting bark. 

Styrax japonica, Japanese snowbell. To 30' 

Spreading, interesting shape. Beautiful, small 
flowers. 

Syringa amurensis japonica, Japanese tree lilac. To 30 
White flowers in late June. 

EVERGREENS 

These trees are best used around the periphery 
of the lawn, as a green background for a shrub or 
herbaceous border and as a shield from neighbors or 
street. Only mature specimens are satisfactory when 
planted alone, but, in contrast to the other two groups 
discussed, buying large evergreens is seldom practical. 
Evergreens always retain some foliage and conse- 
quently they never stop losing water even in the dead 
of winter. For this reason, large evergreens are more 
difficult to transplant than large deciduous trees. 

For almost every conceivable purpose, three 
native species are unrivaled. All three can be easily 
pruned and thus kept as a formal or informal hedge. 
On the other hand, if room permits any of the three 
can be allowed to develop to maturity. None has 
serious insect or disease problems. 

Pinus strobus. White pine. To 150'. 

Ilex opaca, American holly. To 40'. 

Tsuga canadensis, Canadian hemlock. To 80'. 



RELATIONSHIP-(Cont'd) 

as many individual members as possil^le, but it is not 
realistic to expect all of the individual members of 
garden clubs and plant societies to be members of 
the Society. Some compromise plan can, I believe, 
be developed which would 1)e beneficial to all of us. 
Of one thing I am sure, more service furnished by 
the Society to clubs and plant societies, coupled with 
more interest in and support of the Societ}- from their 
membership, will mean increased stature and pleasure 
for all concerned, both as organizations and as 
individuals. 



. 



DAFFODIL WEEKEND TO INCLUDE 
GARDEN VISITS 

Members interested in daffodils will enjoy the 
varied activities planned for the weekend of April 
24, 25 and 26. Joseph B. Townsend, Jr., Chairman of 
the Garden Visits Committee has announced that four 
gardens in the Swarthmore-Media-Wawa area will be 
open to members and their guests on Sunday afternoon, 
April 26 from 2 to 5. These include the gardens of 
Dr. and Mrs. John C. Wister, Mr. and Mrs. Harry 
Wood, Mr. and Mrs. C. L. Jordan and Mr. and Mrs. 
Graham Wood. In addition, members are invited to 
a special viewing of the daffodil plantings at Drexel 
Lodge conducted by Professor Larry Mains. Detailed 
directions and additional information about the garden 
visits will appear in the May NEWS. 

DAFFODIL SHOW 

Other events scheduled for the weekend include 
the 1964 REGIONAL DAFFODIL SHOW to be held 
in the Commercial Museum on Friday and Saturday, 
April 24 and 25 and the following two programs in 
the Museum Extension Room : 

On Friday, April 24 at 2 P. M., Anne Wertsner 
Wood ('Mrs. Harry Wood) will speak on "Spring 
Arrangements featuring Daffodils." Mrs. Wood, who 
is well-known to members of the Pennsylvania Horti- 
cultural Society, served as the Society's Field Secre- 
tary for a number of years and staged all of its 
flower shows, including its section in the Philadelphia 
Flower Show. She is the author of two books, "Make 
Your Own Merry Christmas" and "The Flower Show 
Guide." She has lectured from Maine to Florida, west 
to Texas and New Mexico, and to Canada and 
Bermuda. 

On Friday evening, April 24, at 8 P. M., Carlton 
B. Lees, Executive Secretary of the Massachusetts 
Horticultural Society will present a program, "Daffo- 
dils in the Landscape." Mr. Lees, author of the book 
"Budget Landscaping," was Executive Director of the 
Pennsylvania Horticultural Society from 1959 to 1963. 
While here, he was responsible for initiating many 
new programs and brought e.xciting ideas to all those 
with whom he worked. We are glad to welcome him 
back to Philadelphia. 

Admission to these lectures is by ticket only. 
For free tickets send a self-addressed, stamped en- 
velope to: 

The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society, Inc. 
^ 389 Suburban Station Building 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19103 



1964 REGIONAL DAFFODIL SHOW 
April 24 and 25 

Schedules available on request from the office 
LO 3-7185 



CARL FENNINGER RECEIVES AWARD 

The Distinguished .Achievement Award of the 
I'ennsylvania Horticultural Society was presented to 
Carl W. Fenninger at the Annual Spring Luncheon 
of the Society on March 10 at the Bellevue Stratford 
Hotel. The award was made in recognition of Mr. 
Fenninger's outstanding service to horticulture. He 
is the President of the Board of Trustees of the Tyler 
Arboretum and serves as a Director of the American 
Horticultural Society. In addition, Mr. Fenninger 
served for ten years as Secretary-Treasurer of the 
-American Association of Botanical Gardens and 
Arboretum. 

Certificates of Merit were presented to Mr. and 
Mrs. George R. Clark for an outstanding spring gar- 
den; to Mr. and Mrs. J. Liddon Pennock, Jr. for 
effective garden illumination ; to Mr. and Mrs. Donald 
P. Ross for the excellence of their garden's design ; 
and to the Scott Paper Comjjany for effective planting 
around their Executive and Research Headquarters. 
Mr. George W. Furness, Chairman of the Society's 
Awards Committee made the presentations. 



LETTERS TO THE NEWS . . . 

Dear Mrs. Ballard: 

Is there not a mistake in the Quarantine article 
in the NEWS in which it is said that the quarantine 
applies to seeds? I have never needed a permit nor 
do I believe the growers have for the many seeds I 
get from abroad every year. If I am correct, the 
NEWS should surely make this clear. 

Doretta Klaber 

Regulation Q. 37-4 provides thai, with certain excep- 
tions, field, vegetable, jlower and other herbaceous plant 
seeds, as distinguished from seeds of trees and shrubs, are 
permitted entry without formal permit. All seeds in this 
category are nevertheless subject to inspection and treatment 
to prevent risk of pest introduction. Most tree and shrub 
seeds are enterable under permit, but there are prohibitions 
as to certain seeds from certain countries. Ed. 



ENGLISH GARDEN TOUR HAS OPENINGS 

Registrations for the Society's nineteen day gar- 
den tour to England under the leadership of Mrs. 
Edward J. Garra were made by twenty-one Society 
members within thtee weeks of the announcement 
in October. Since this was the total number planned 
for, no additional reservations were taken. Now, due 
to unforeseen circumstances, two places are available. 
The tour is scheduled to leave Philadelphia on Thurs- 
day, May 14, and to return on Monday, June 1. In- 
terested members may call the Society office LO 3- 
7185 for information and details. 



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MEMBER'S EVENING 

On April 7, Mrs. Ernest C. Drew, a knowledge- 
able horticulturist and a trained librarian with long 
experience working in specialized libraries will present 
a program titled "Books for Gardeners." Mrs. Drew 
is a member of the Society's library committee and 
regularly contributes one morning a week to volunteer 
work on the library catalog. 

Mrs. Drew is a graduate of Wellesley College 
and the Simmons library school. She is a Vice-Presi- 
dent of the American Begonia Society, Inc. and 
frequently writes articles for its publication, "The 
Begonian." 

The program will begin at 7:30. The library will 
be open between 5:00 and 7:30 for the convenience of 
members. 



Register by using the clip-out coupon. Please enclose check and 
mail to 389 Suburban Station, Phita. 19103. Registrations accepted 
in the order received; confirmation by return post card. 



CLINIC AND FIELD TRIP 
RESERVATION 

D ROSES PART I 

March 31 7:30 P.M. $2.00 

D RHODODENDRONS AND AZALEAS 

April 8 7:30 P.M. $2.00 

n BONSAI 

AprU 21 1:30 P.M. $8.00 

D FIELD TRIP - HENRY FOUNDATION 

May 10 3:00 P.M. $2.00 

D CHRYSANTHEMUM CLINIC 

May 26 1:30 P.M. $3.00 

Name 

Address 

City 

Telephone 



FIELD TRIP PLANNED 

On Tuesday, May 12, members of the Society will 
be the guests of the Henry Foundation for Botanical 
Research in Gladwyne, Pennsylvania. Mary Gibson 
Henry (Mrs. J. Norman Henry), the President, will 
conduct a tour of the gardens, which contain manj' 
rare native plants collected by Mrs. Henry on ex- 
peditions made for the purpose of discovering and 
preserving native plants. 

Mrs. Henry, who is a Research Associate, Depart- 
ment of Botany at the Academy of Natural Sciences, 
has received nine medals for her work in horticulture 
and botanical research. A recently discovered species 
of tree, Chamaecyparis Henryae. bears her name as well 
as a mountain in Northern British Columbia. 

Advance registration is required, and enrollment 
is limited. Members will be sent directions with con- 
firmation of their registration. Time 3 P.M. ; Fee $2.00. 



GROWING CHRYSANTHEMUMS FOR SHOW 

How to grow specimen potted chrysanthemums, 
exhibition size blooms and perfect plants will be the 
subject of a clinic to be conducted in May. 

Mrs. George W. Stott of Lansdowne will be the 
instructor. Mrs. Stott is the winner of many blue 
ribbons and impressive awards in both local and 
regional shows featuring chrysanthemums. 

Also included will be information on growing 
cascades and other types conforming to the Society's 
Chrysanthemum Show Schedule. 

Instructor: Mrs. George W. Stott; Place: to be 
announced in May NEWS; Date: Tuesday, May 26, 
1:30 P.M. Fee: $3.00 (includes plant and pot.) 



¥ 



THE PENNSYLVANIA 
HORTICULTUR 



SOCIB 



1617 PENNSYLVANIA BOULEVARD 
PHILADELPHIA 3, PENNSYLVANIA 



)^Q^ 




VOL V. No. 5 



MAY. 1964 



AWARD WINNER INSPIRES GROWERS 

Thousands of visitors to the 1964 Philadelphia 
Flower Show saw and admired the topiary ivy sea 
lion grown by Mrs. F. Otto Haas of Ambler. Mrs. 
Haas' methods are described below. 

We do not intend to imply that anyone can do 
this, and emphasize that although the directions are 
simple, good results cannot be expected without great 
determination, patience, a certain amount of manual 
dexterity, and close attention to growing conditions. 
If you can supply these essentials, you will find the 
effort rewarding. 

Frame Important. A sturdy frame is literally the 
backbone of the creation. Use the heaviest gauge of 
galvanized wire you can handle. Anything lighter 
than #8 will lack rigidity. The trick is to pull the 
coil of wire into a spiral, which can then be varied 
in diameter and bent or twisted to form the desired 
sha])e. Brace the spiral with ribs running approxi- 
mately at right angles and forming rough rectangles 








T^f\r\^ '^^K Topmy s^/?i 



Grown by Mrs. F. Ot+o Haas of Ambler and awarded 
the Edith Wilder Scott Award for fhe oufs+anding 
exhibit in the Amateur Horticultural Division of the 
1964 Philadelphia Flower Show. 

an inch or two on a side. Hold the junctures in place 
with adhesive tape until the desired shape is attained. 
Then cover each taped point with thin galvanized 
wire to make a strong and permanent union. 

The form must be large enough so that the shape 
will be recognizable and the details will be apparent 
when it is covered with ivy. 

Planting the Frame. Starting at the bottom, pack 
the form tightly with damp sphagnum moss, the long 
grain unmilled kind that is used for hanging baskets. 
As you pack, plant the young ivy plants in the moss, 
placing them close together and making sure that the 
root balls are surrounded with moss and that no air 
holes are left. Continue up the frame in this manner 
until the entire body is solid with moss and ivy. Use 
only young plants and avoid old ones with woody 
stems. 

Using hairpins, attach the trailing stems to the 

(Cont'd page five) 

I — 



GARDEN VISITS 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

Gardens are open from 1 :30 to 5 P M. Your 
membership card is your ticket of admission. Members 
may bring guests upon payment of $1.00 per guest. 
Guest tickets are available at any of the gardens or, 
in advance, from the office and will admit guests to 
all the gardens open for the day. Family groups will 
be admitted upon presentation of a Family, Contribu- 
ting or Sustaining Membership Card. 

Members are requested not to arrive at any gar- 
den before the scheduled opening hour and to leave 
promptly at closing time. Gardens open irrespective 
of weather. See page 6 for Bus information. 



SUNDAY, APRIL 26 

Five gardens in the Media-Swarthmore-Wawa 
areas will be opened on Sunday, April 26. 

ROUTE 

Starting from Phila. take Baltimore Ave. to inter- 
section with Sproul Rd. (Rte. 320). Turn left on 320 
through Swarthmore under railroad overpass to Har- 
vard Ave. (1.1 mile from Baltimore Ave.) right on 
Harvard Ave. to No. 735 on right, Garden No. 1, 

Mr. and Mrs. John C. Wister 

Swarthmore, Pa. 

Leaving Mr. and Mrs. Wister's continue on Harvard 
to Yale Ave., left on Yale Ave., left on Chester Rd. 
(Rte. 320, first stop light) return through Swarthmore 
to Elm Ave. (.8 mile) left on Elm Ave. to 400 Walnut 
Lane, Garden No. 2, 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Wood 

Swarthmore, Pa. 

Leaving Mr. and Mrs. Wood's, right on Walnut Lane 
to dead end, left on Swarthmore Ave. and left on 
Baltimore Pike to Providence Rd., Media. (Rte. 252,) 
turn right, cross Red Arrow trolley tracks and take 
first right. Mulberry Lane to dead end, left on Tru- 
penny Rd. to dead end at Twyckenham Rd., Garden 
No. 3, 

Mr. and Mrs. C. L. Jordan 

Twyckenham Rd. 

Bowling' Green, Media, Pa. 

Leaving Mr. and Mrs. Jordan's return to Providence 
Rd., (Rte. 320) turn right 1.6 mile to Rte. 1, left on 
Rte. 1 (toward Baltimore) 4.8 miles to Wawa Rd., 
left on Wawa Rd. to stone gate posts with rabbits on 
right, enter to "Blossom Hill," Garden No. 4, 

Mr. and Mrs. Grahame Wood 

Wawa, Pa. 

Return via Wawa Rd. and Rte. 1 to Providence Rd., 
(Rte. 252 turn left (north) for .5 miles. Continue 
straight on Providence Rd. where Rte. 252 bears right. 
Continue 4.1 miles to West Chester Pike (Rte. 3) 
turn right 1.6 miles, to enter Drexel Lodge on right. 
Garden No. 5, 

Property of Drexel Institute of Technology 

Newtown Square, Pa. 

Directed by Professor L. P. Mains 



SUNDAY, MAY 10 

Five gardens will be open un Sunday, May 10, 
in the Ardmore-Gladwyne-Villanova areas. 

ROUTE 

Starling from Philadelphia proceed through Fair- 
mount Park on Belmont Ave., etc. (Rte. 23) to Mont- 
gomery Ave., Bala Cynwyd. Left on Montgomery 
•Ave. (Rte. 23A) through Narberth to Gypsy Lane, 
Wynnewood. Turn right .3 miles to drive on left. 
Garden No. 1. 

Mrs. W. W. Philler 

129 Gypsy Lane, Wynnewood 

Leaving Mrs. Philler's continue on Gypsy Lane .6 
miles to Mill Creek Rd., (Rte. 23.) then right .7 miles 
to Righters Mill Rd., right .4 miles to Xo. 210, drive 
on right. Garden No. 2, 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. LaRoche 
210 Righters Mill Road, Penn Valley 

On leaving Mr. and Mrs. LaRoche's continue on 
Righters Mill Rd. .4 miles to Hagys Ford Rd., right 
1 mile to Old Gulph Rd., right 1.0 miles to Mill 
Creek Rd., right on Mill Creek Rd. to Righters Mill 
Rd., left (across ford) to dead end at Black Rock 
Rd. Turn left on Black Rock Rd., .5 miles to drive 
on left. Garden Xo. 3, 

Mr. and Mrs. John G. Williams 

831 Black Rock Road, Gladwyne 

Leaving Mr. and Mrs. Williams' continue on Black 
Rock Road, .1 miles to Williamson Rd., left .3 miles 
to Garden No. 4, 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas W. Sears 

400 Williamson Road, Ardmore 

Continue on Williamson Road to Youngs Ford Road, 
bear right, .5 miles to Old Gulph Rd., right (across 
Ford,) cross Morris Avenue and continue to Mont- 
gomery Ave., Rosemont, (Old Gulph Rd. becomes 
Roberts Rd.) a distance of 2.3 miles, right on Mont- 
gomery .Avenue 1.3 miles to Spring Mill Rd., (Rte. 
320,) left on Spring Mill .4 miles to County Line Rd., 
right on County Line .4 miles to Garden Xo. 5 on left, 

Mr. and Mrs. R. Barclay Scull 

741 County Line Road, Villanova 



IRIS SHOW MAY 23, 1964 

The Delaware Valley Iris Society and the Penn- 
sylvania Hor+icul+ural Society will jointly sponsor 
a one-day iris show, Saturday May 23, at St. 
Alban's Church, (Rt. 252 and Chapel Road just 
north of West Chester Pike) Newtown Square. The 
Show will be open to the public fronn noon to 
8 P.M. 

Members of the Society who have exhibited in 
past iris shows will receive this year's schedule 
automatically; others may obtain a copy by writing 
or telephoning the Society office, LO 3-8352, 
LO 3-7185. 



— 2- 



LIBRARY NOTES 
BOOKS FOR TRAVELERS IN THE U. S. A. 

The library receives many inquiries about public 
gardens and other places of horticultural interest in 
this country and abroad. Many travelers enjoy iden- 
tifying the plants in foreign countries and visiting 
famous gardens, parks, and arboretums throughout 
the world. The United States itself offers many di- 
verse growing conditions and consequently many 
kinds of plants and many interpretations of garden- 
ing. Before you set out on a vacation this year, we 
suggest you read something about the plants and 
gardens in the areas you intend to visit. Several books 
in the library will serve as guides. Some are detailed 
lists in index form ; others read like novels and others 
are pictorial guides. Here are a few which might be 
helpful : 

Enjoying America's Gardens by Joan Parry Dutton. 
As an Englishwoman touring the gardens of the 
United States, Mrs. Dutton looks beyond the gardens 
themselves to include descriptions of plants and people 
she has seen at each stopping place. This is a thor- 
oughly enjoyable book and an excellent background 
for those traveling across the county to a specific 
place . A list of gardens open to the public is included. 

A Pictorial Guide to American Gardens by Louis H. 

Frohman and Jean Elliot. 

This is our library's most complete guide to public 
gardens and arboreta. Each state's gardens are des- 
cribed, and very often illustrated, and a list of plants 
of particular interest in each is noted. Information is 
also given as to addresses, admission fees and the 
dates and times when the gardens are open. There 
is a valuable index to plant material, (i.e., if you wish 
to see displays of lilies, you look under "lilies" for 
a list of gardens featuring them). 

Treasury of American Gardens by James M. Fitch 
and F. F. Rockwell is a beautiful book devoted 
primarily to illustrating private gardens throughout 
the nation. Although not a guide to gardens generally 
available to the sightseer, it provides an indication of 
the plants and architecture to be found in the regions 
pictured. Each garden is ably described with a list of 
the plants that have been used. 

Southern California Gardens by Victoria Padilla. 

This is an essential book for anyone visiting 
Southern California, it gives the history of gardening 
from the time of the conquistadors and the earliest 
settlers, describes the native and naturalized plants, 
and tells about the people responsible for local horti- 
cultural accomplishments. This is good reading even 
for armchair travelers. 

Caroliria Gardens by E. T. H. ShafTer is another 
regional history which is outstanding in its back- 
ground information. Histories of the plantations are 
told as part of the stories of rice, indigo, and cotton 
which are after all, the reasons for the existence of 
plantations. The garden descriptions are grouped ac- 



cording to the terrains that determine the gardening 
plants and methods: coastal, pinelands, piedmont, and 
alpine. This is a book of both historical and gardening 
significance. 

Our horticultural librarian, Nancy Urian will 
gladly help you find places of horticultural interest 
or will provide lists of well known nurseries, special 
exhibits or regional plant displays in the states you 
expect to visit. 



RECENT ACQUISITIONS 

Miniature Plants for Home and Greenhouse by Mlvin Mc- 
Donald. \'an Nostrand. 

Begonias and How to Grow Them by Bessie R. Buxton. 
Oxford L'niv. Press. 194fi. 

How to Use Plants and Flowers in Church Decoration by 

John R. Scotford. Revell. 

The New Complete Book of African Violets by Helen van 
Pelt Wilson. Barrows. 

Botany, an Evolutionary Approach bv R. Darnley Gibbs. 
Blakiston. 1950. 

Man's Role in Chang^ing the Face of the Earth edited by Wni. 
L. Thomas. Univ. of Chicago Press. 

The New Small Garden by Lady Allen of Hurtwood and 
Susan Jellicoe. .-Krchitectural Press. 

On Modern Art by Paul Klee. Faber and Faber. 

The Culture of Cities by Lewis Mumford. Harcourt, Brace. 

Survival Through Design by Richard Neutra. Oxford Univ. 
Press. 

Treasures of the Shore by Marcia G. Norman. Chatham Con- 
servation Foundation. 

Garden Flowers by R. D. Meikle. St. Martin's Press. 

Shrub Roses of Today by Graham S. Thomas. St. Martin's 
Press. 

The Image of the City by Kevin Lynch. The M.I.T. Press. 

Garden Open Today by Beverley Xichols. Dutton. 

Venezuelan Orchids by Dunsterville and Garay. vols. 1 and 2. 
Andre Deutsch Museum. 

The City Gardener by Philip Truex. Knopf. 
Gardening in a Small Greenhouse by Mary Noble and J. K. 
Merkel. \'an Nostrand. 

A Christmas Letter: Some Flower Books and Their Makers 

by Moncure Biddle. Biddle, 1945. 

A Guide to the Wild Flowers bv .\lice Lounsberrv. Stokes, 
1899. 

Asparagus Culture: the Best Methods Employed in England 
and France by James Barnes. McKay, 1881. 

Mushrooms: How to Grow them bv William Falconer. Orange 
Judd, 1925. 

Humor and Humus bv the Garden Club of Wilmington. Del. 
n.d. 

Sertum Anglicum 1788 by Charles-Louis L'Heritier de Brutelle. 
(Facsimilie) Hunt Bot. Lib. 

Gardening for Profit by Peter Henderson. Orange Judd. 1887. 
Create New Flowers and Plants by John James. Doubleday. 
The Earth: a History of Husbandry by Russel Lord. New 
American Library. 

American Skyline by Christopher Tunnard. New American 
Library. 

John Lyon, Nurseryman and Plant Hunter and his Journal, 

1799-1814 by Joseph and Nesta Ewan. .•\merican Philo- 
sophical Society. 

Rustic Ornaments by Shirley Hibberd. Groonibridge, 1856. 

The Langfuage of Flowers by Robert Tyas. Routledge, 1869. 

The Art of Flower Preservation by Geneal Condon. Lane. A 
Sunset Book. 



— 3 — 



THE PENNSYLVANIA HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 



Carroll R. Wetzel 

Secretary 
Miss Estelle L. Sharp 



OFFICERS 

President 
R. Gwynne Stout 

Vice Presidents 
Frederick W. G. Peck 



J. Liddon Pennock, Jr. 

Treasurer 
John G. Williams 



Term Ending December 31, 1964 

Mrs. Van Horn Ely 
Theodore Foulk, II 
Mrs. James C. Hornor 
J. Liddon Pennock, Jr. 
Mrs. J. Pancoast Reath 
Mrs. Francis H. Scheetz 
R. Gwynne Stout 
Joseph B. Townsend, Jr. 
William H. Weber 



Mrs. Alfred S. Martin 



EXECUTIVE COUNCIL 

Term Ending December 31, 1965 

Airs. Henry W. Breyer, Jr. 
W. Atlee Burpee, Jr. 
George R. Clark 
Mrs. Franklin d'Olier 
Mrs. Edward L. Elliot 
Henry D. Mirick 
Mrs. Walter W. Pollock, Jr. 
J. Franklin Styer 
Carroll R. Wetzel 

Elected to Serve Until the Next Annual Meeting 
Mrs. Leon Sunstein, Jr. 



Jr. 



Term Ending December 31, 1966 

Mrs. E. Page Allinson 
John M. Fogg, Jr. 
George Wood Furness 
Mrs. H. Cameron Morris 
Frederick W. G. Peck 
Miss Estelle L. Sharp 
John G. Williams 



Eugene Udell 



COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN FOR 1964-1965 



Awards : George Wood Furness 
Bonsai Exhibition : Mrs. W. R. Mackinney 
Capital Fund Drive: Carroll R. Wetzel 
Christmas Show: Mrs. W. Charles Hogg, Jr. 
Chrysanthemum Show: William H. Weber 

Mrs. George W. Stott 
Daffodil Show: Mrs. Joseph B. Townsend, Jr. 
Editorial: Miss Joan Taylor 
Educational Exhibits: Mrs. Alfred S. Martin 
Executive : George R. Clark 
Finance : Carroll R. Wetzel 
Garden Clinics: Mrs. George E. DeCoursey 



Garden Visits: Joseph B. Townsend, Jr. 

Headquarters Development: Henry D. Mirick 

Horticultural Coordination : Mrs. E. Page Allinson 

Iris Show: A. Edward Murray, Jr. 

Library : Mrs. James C. Hornor 

Member's Evenings & Lectures : Frederick W. G. Peck 

Nominating: John G. Williams 

Philadelphia Flower Show: Mrs. Franklin d'Olier 

Plant Exchange: Paul Whippo 

Peter Cox 
Public Relations: Mrs. Walter W. Pollock, Jr. 



OFFICE STAFF 



Ernesta D. Ballard, Executive Secretary 
Nancy G. Urian, Horticultural Librarian 
Catherine E. Taggart, Membership Secretary 
F. Evelyn Hett, Horticultural Secretary 



Diane J. Seaman. Secretarial Assistant 
Florence Townsend, Bookkeeper (part-time) 
Elva Gerhab, Secretary (part-time) 
George Huber, Librarian (part-time) 



OFFICE TELEPHONES: LO 3-8352 - LO 3-7185 
MAILING ADDRESS: 389 Suburban Station Building, Philadelphia, Pa. 19103 

— 4 — 



ON GROWING VEGETABLES 

The home vegetable garden is the gourmet's 
garden. Here emphasis is on flavor and freshness, 
those extra dividends which make the home vegetable 
plot, however small, well worth the time and efl^ort 
it requires. The American preoccupation with size 
and mass distribution has led to the production of 
enormous fruits and vegetables bred for appearance 
uniformity, extraordinary keeping quality, the ability 
to withstand shipping and, possibly as a result, an 
almost complete lack of flavor. 

The home gardener has also the deep satisfaction 
of eating food he has grown himself, a thrill which 
few of us are to sophisticated to enjoy. 

A few guidelines are listed here to help beginners 
and remind the more experienced. 

Location: A location with at least 6 hours of sunlight 
is essential. Ground must be well drained. A south 
facing slope is ideal. 

Size: Up to the gardener, but restraint is advised. 
Most beginners undertake too large a garden. 

Soil Preparation: When the soil has dried out sufti- 
ciently to work in the spring, it should be plowed, 
or turned by hand. Additions of rotted compost, 
manure or peat moss at this time will increase the 
water holding capacity of the soil. Tests for the pH 
content should be made by taking samples (a tea- 
spoon in each of several places), to your local county 
agent for analysis. The analysis is free, and the agent 
will make recommendations for additions of lime if 
necessary. 

Planting: Small plants of many vegetables are avail- 
able at roadside stands, but unusual varieties are sel- 
dom to be found. They must be ordered in advance. 
Varieties to grow from seed planted directly in the 
garden are starred in the list given below. 

Watering and Fertilizing.: Plants grown in soil that 
dries out often are never as luscious and juicy as 
those that have been well watered. High fertility is 
essential for top quality. At least two applications of 
a 5-10-5 fertilizer will be needed for plants that take 
more than 70 days to mature. 

*Beans : Wade (green, all American Gold Medal Win- 
ner, resistant to common bean mosaic and powdery 
mildew), Tendercrop (green), Easter Butterwax 
(yellow). Royalty (purple podded), Blue Cow (pur- 
ple podded, pole). 
*Beets: Detroit Dark Red, Long season (also called 
Winter Keeper). 
Broccoli : Waltham 29 
*Carrots : Nantes, Tip Top Nantes, Tendersweet 

Cauliflower: Early Purple Head 
*Corn: Miniature, Wonderful 

Eggplant: Black Magic, Early Beauty Hybrid 
*Lettuce: Bibb (early season only), Buttercrunch, 

Manoa Special, Matchless, Sweetheart, Ruby, Salad 
Bowl. 



1964 CHRYSANTHEMUM SHOW 
SCHEDULED 

The Chrysanthemum Show will again be held in 
the American Baptist Convention at Valley Forge on 
October 31, and November 1. of this year. Ten clubs 
and organizations especially interested in growing 
and showing chrysanthemums have agreed to act as 
sponsors. William H. Weber is the show chairman. 
Schedules will be ready in April and will be mailed 
to members on request. 

RADCLIFFE CLASS 

The attention of amateur growers is particularly 
invited to the Wayne W. Radcliffe class because of 
the early deadline for entry application. 

W^hile an individual must win first place in the 
class three times for permanent possession of the 
trophy, each winner will receive a smaller annual 
trophy in recognition of his or her achievement. 

Three rooted cuttings of an unspecified variety 
will be provided to those applying for entry. These 
must be grown as disbudded bush plants, each in an 
8 inch pot (last pinch suggested August 1.) Protec- 
tion from frost is allowed. Exhibitors are required 
to show all surviving plants. 

Applications for entry must be received in writing, 
by May 1, 1964. Plants may then be obtained from 
Mr. Weber, Erdenheim Farms between May 1 and 
20. They cannot be mailed. 

A special information sheet on growing chrysan- 
themums in pots has been prepared and is available 
from the Society on request. 

Award Winner Inspires— (cont'd) 

body of the form until it is completely covered. Bare 
spots can be filled with rooted cuttings. 

As the ivy grows, continue fastening the shoots in 
place with hairpins. 

Culture is the Key to Success. Culture requires 
that the moss be kept damp at all times. Regular addi- 
tions of a soluble chemical fertilizer to the water 
will keep the ivy growing vigorously. If the topiary 
is grown in the house, it can be placed on a water- 
proof tray or dish and watered from the top. Daily 
spraying with a fog-type sprayer will help too. 

Mrs. Haas, who won the same class last year with 
a topiary rooster, reports that she started planting the 
sea lion in early January and worked on it for the 
best part of two days a week until March 1. 

The Horticultural Division of the 1965 schedule 
for the Philadelphia Flower Show will include a class 
for topiary ivy and a clinic will be held in the fall to 
help members get started. We look forward to a 
large horticultural zoo on opening day next year. 

*Lima bean: Fordhook U. S. #252 

Onions: Ebenezer sets 
*Parsley: Paramount 

Pepper : Pennwonder 
*Radish: Champion, Icicle 
'Spinach: Viking, America 
*Squash: Zucchini Hybrid, Seneca Prolific Hybrid 

Tomato : Big Boy, Sunray, Rutgers 



— 5 — 



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DATES To Mark On Your CALENDAR 

APRIL 24-25 

1964 Regional Daffodil Show 

Commercial Museum 

APRIL 24 

"Spring Arrangements Featuring Daffodils" 
Anne Wertsner Wood (Mrs. Harry Wood) 

Commercial Museum, 2 P.M. 

'"Daffodils in the Landscape" 
Carlton B. Lees 

Commercial Museum, 8 P. M. 

APRIL 26 

Garden Visits - Swarthmore-Media-Wawa 

MAY 6 

Plant Sale - Providence Garden Club 
Tyler Arboretum, Lima, Pa. 

MAY 10 

Garden Visits - Ardmore-Gladwyne-Villanova 

MAY 12 

Field Trip to Henry Foundation, 3 P.M. 

MAY 12 

Annual Spring Plant Sale 

Ambler Campus, Temple University 10-4 P.M. 

MAY 14 

Annual Herb Sale - Phila. Unit, Herb Society of 
America - Walter K. Howard's, 279 Warner Rd., 
Wayne. 

MAY 23 

Delaware Valley Iris Show 

St. Alban's Church, Newtown Square 

MAY 26 

Garden Clinic 

Growing Chrysanthemums for Show, 1 :30 P.M. 



PLANT EXCHANGE 

Members . . . plec^e nofe fhaf the date is 
Saturday, June 20. Details will appear in the 
June NEWS. 



FIELD TRIP 

On Thursday, June 4, Elizabeth M. Woodford, 
known to many for her intimate knowledge of New 
Jersey's Pine Barrens, will conduct a field trip for 
members. The excursion will take place, rain or 
shine, and members who have registered in advance 
are asked to meet Mrs. Woodford at the east end 
of the Marlton diner, located on the Marlton traffic 
circle on New Jersey Route 70. Bring a sandwich 
lunch. Time: 10 A.M. to 3 P.M. Fee: $2.00. 



Bus Reservations For Garden Visits: 

A bus win leave from the Kennedy Boulevard entrance of Suburban 
Station Building at 12:30 on April 26, and at 1 o'clock on May 10. 



BUS RESERVATION BLANK 

GARDEN VISITS 

Please check 

D April 26 $2.00 

n May 10 $1.50 

Application with payment must reach the Pennsylvania 
Horticultural Society, 389 Suburban Station, Phila., Pa. 
19103 by the Tuesday preceding the visit day. 



Name 



Addiess 



CLINIC AND FIELD TRIP 
RESERVATION 

n FIELD TRIP - HENRY FOUNDATION 

May 12 3:00 P.M. $2.00 

D CHRYSANTHEMUM CUNIC 

May 26 1:30 P.M. $3.00 

n FIELD TRIP TO PINE BARRENS 

June 4 10:00 $2.00 



Name . . . . 
Address . . 
Telephone 



— 6 — 



THE PENNSYLVANIA^ 

HORTICULTURAL i 
^^^^^^^^KL SOCIETY E 




VOL. V. No. 

J] 


6 


JUNE. 1964 


1617 PENNSYLVANIA BOULEVARD ■ 

PHILADELPHIA 3. PENNSYLVANIA W 


rr lj 



PROJECT 70 - A BRIEF REVIEW 



One of the aims of the Pennsylvania Horticul- 
tural Society is to encourage conservation. Anyone 
interested in growing plants must also be concerned 
about the preservation of trees, shrubs, and wild- 
flowers in their natural settings. Accordingly, we are 
devoting most of this month's horticultural section 
of the NEWS to a review of Project 70, Penn- 
sylvania's most recent and ambitious conservation 
venture. 

Project 70 is a project for acquiring and develop- 
ing parks and recreational areas, both large and small. 
It derives its name from the fact that it includes 
authorized expenditures of $70,000,000 by 1970. 

WHAT IS PROJECT 70 

Project 70 was passed by the voters of Pennsyl- 
vania last fall. To issue bonds and start the land 
acquisition program, the Legislature must pass an 
enabling act spelling out procedures and safeguards. 
Enabling legislation is before the House and the 
Senate as this is written, and it would be very much 
in order for Society members to write to their repre- 
sentatives in Harrisburg in support of it. (It is an 
unfortunate fact that those opposed to any measure 
tend to be more vocal than its supporters.) 

THE NEED FOR THE PROJECT 

The reader may wonder why Pennsylvania, which 
already owns extensive state forests and other open 
land, should spend $70 million for more. The answer 
is that the State's present holdings are inaccessible. 
Most of the land is located in 24 central and northern 
counties where only 9% of the state's population lives. 
In the remaining 43 counties, the balance of the popu- 
lation, 91%, is residing under increasingly crowded 
conditions. 

Project 70 would provide new opportunities for 
outdoor recreation, additional open space and scenic 
preserves in densely populated suburban and urban 
areas, and a better and more lasting supply of water to 
serve the increasing needs of people and industry. 
In addition, it will help in the preservation of Penn- 
sylvania's notable landscapes, including historical 
landmarks. New business investment and new jobs 
will result from the growth of tourism and much 
property will increase in value. 



FINANCING 

The $70 million would be spent in this way: 

1) $40,000,000 for the acquisition of land in the 
43 counties where publicly owned recreational land 
is less than 19% of the total land area, or where there 
is an urban area of 2,500 persons or more. Supple- 
mental Federal financial aid would be available up to 
30%. This portion of funds would be used for large 
regional parks and reservoirs in relatively close prox- 
imity to major metropolitan areas. 

2) $20,000,000 for grants to local municipalities 
in all counties to help provide smaller parks and play- 
fields which will be used on a day-to-day basis. These 
funds could be supplemented up to 20 or 30% in 
Federal open space grants. 

3) $10,000,000 to provide new fish and wildlife 
preserves and more access areas to our rivers in the 
43 critical counties. 

Money for these acquisitions would be raised by 
the issuance of 30 year state bonds. Development 
money as contrasted to the land acquisition money, 
would come from the State's general fund, and from 
the Federal government and from private sources. 

Project 70 is not expected to increase state taxes 
above their present level. Acquired lands would be 
taken oflf their local real estate tax rolls, but experi- 
ence with past projects shows that the loss will be 
more than ofi^set by the increase in surrounding land 
values and in tourist business. 

PROS AND CONS 

Two arguments have been raised against the 
project. The first is that, because the state can con- 
demn land for park purposes, farmers and other rural 
residents will sufifer an involuntary loss of a large 
part of their lands. The answer to this is that only 
in extremely rare cases does the Commonwealth 
resort to condemnation for conservation or recreation 
purpose. 

The second argument is that State parks in the 
rural and suburban areas will bring additional people 
to those areas. The answer here is that additional 
people are more desirable than having open space 
permanently obliterated. 

(Cont'd on page 3] 



LAWN TIP 

Though not yet obvious, crabgrass seedlings have 
germinated in most lawns. The season for applying 
pre-emergent controls is past and now the best control 
is encouragement of a vigorous and dense turf. This 
is best accomplished by the following basic practices: 
Set your mower at 2" 

Kentucky bluegrass-red fescue type lawns 

should not be cut closer than lj4" and 

2" will allow stronger growth. 

Water only if you can let the sprinkler run for 

several iiours, or until the soil is soaked to depth 

of 4 or 5". 

Light surface waterings encourage crabgrass 

seedlings, and do the desirable grasses no 

good. 

Apply a fertilizer manufactured especially for 

lawns at least three times during the growing 

season. 

Regular feeding will develop a good turf that 
leaves no room for weeds. 
Use chemicals as an aid and remember that they 
are not cure-alls. 

Lawns badly infested with crabgrass and 
other weeds may be helped by careful use of 
selective herbicides: 2, 4-D, 2, 4-5T and silvex 
for most broad leaved weeds ; disodium or 
ammonium methyl arsonate, phenyl mercury 
or potassium cyanate preparations for crab- 
grass. 
The library's horticultural file contains a number 
of excellent leaflets on lawn care prepared and pub- 
lished by the Extension Services of the College of 
Agriculture, Rutgers, the State University of New 
Jersey and the Pennsylvania State University. Mem- 
bers are urged to study them. 



DAFFODIL SHOW A SUCCESS 

Over 600 specimen dafifodils were exhibited at the 
Society's 1964 Regional Daffodil Show held in co- 
operation with the American Daffodil Society and 17 
local garden clubs. The schedule called for 28 different 
classes of blooms. Each class was divided into two 
sections — one in which a single blooming stem was 
shown and one in which a group of three were 
required. 

The Gold Ribbon of the American Daffodil 
Society awarded to the Best Daffodil in the Show, 
went to a small-cup bicolor 'Corofin' grown by Dr. 
Walter M. Andress of Bethel, Delaware. Dr. Andress 
also won the ADS Silver Ribbon for winning the 
most blue ribbons in the show, and the Pennsylvania 
Horticultural Society's Sweepstakes Bowl for earning 
the greatest number of svl'eepstakes points. 

The Carey E. Quinn Award for a collection of 
24 named varieties, representing not fewer than 5 
divisions was won by Dr. W. A. Bender of Chambers- 
burg, Pa. Dr. and Mrs. John Wister received the 
Special Achievement Award from the Garden Club 
Federation of Pennsylvania for their exhibit of "SO 
Old Daffodils." 




PLANT EXCHANGE - JUNE 20 

The annual plant exchange will be held on Satur- 
day, June 20, in the barn at the residence of Mr. and 
Mrs. Frederic L. Ballard, Northwestern Avenue and 
Thomas Road, Chestnut Hill. The date has been 
changed to June to put the activity at a time when 
garden work is less pressing. The later date will also 
allow participants to dig outdoor plants now and 
get them firmly established in a container or in a 
good ball well wrapped in burlap or plastic (with 
drainage holes, of course) by June 20. Plants so 
prepared should be kept in the shade until the time 
of the exchange. In the past we have been presented 
with a distressing amount of poorly packed material 
which could not be expected to survive. 

Plants for exchange must be received before 10 
A. M. They will then be classified according to type, 
(indoor plants, hardy perennials, trees, shrubs, annuals 
and so forth) and graded as to condition and avail- 
ability. The choicest material will go to the Connois- 
seur's Corner, less desirable items to the Main Floor 
or to the Bargain Basement. (Bargain Basement 
material will limit the donor to trading in that de- 
partment only.) All plants must be labeled. The 
committee will help out in cases where genus and 
species are unknown, but cannot, of course, identify 
varieties. 

Trading will begin at 10:45. A special exhibit is 
planned for traders to study while waiting for the 
starting bell. 

A new innovation this year will be a special 
award for the member bringing the greatest number 
of well-established plants. 

Peter Cox and Paul Whippo are co-Chairmen for 
this year's exchange. They are signing up volunteers 
to help between 8:30 A. M. and 11:30 on the day of 
the exchange. Interested members should contact the 
Society office for more information. 



LIBRARY NOTES 



Members are reminded that they can get books 
from the Society library by mail. Current books on 
all garden subjects are available and a telephone call 
or a post card will bring them to you if you are unable 
to come into the library. Trade catalogs from plant 
specialists are also available for use in the library as 
well as special plant society publications, magazines 
having to do with gardening, and reference works 
pertaining to horticulture. The rare book collection is 
available for special studies or if you are interested 
in a topic in which it can be helpful. 

The peonies, edited by John C. Wister, The .American Horti- 
cultural Society, Washington, 1952. 

This is a manual by a distinguished committee of American 
peony specialists, headed by Dr. Wister, and is an authoritative 
work in two sections: the Herbaceous Peonies and the Tree 
Peonies (the second section is a virtual reprint of an older 
publication). 

Each section covers botanical classification, horticultural 
groups, history of culture, and the best descriptions yet pub- 
lished of hybridists and their work in the genus. Lists of the 
better varieties are given along vifith their culture, propagation, 
and breeding. 

The most remarkable feature of this book is its clearly 
stated pleas and horticultural argument for the conservation 
of the botanical name of Paeonia albUjlora for the common 
Chinese peonies. These are generally considered a single 
species. An earlier name Paeonia lactijlora, discovered and ac- 
cepted by Stern has caused much dissention among peony 
experts and in this book the rejections of the horticulturists is 
heard through several chapters. Interwoven among these 
controversial notes is a very fine handbook on peony culture 
and history. 

J. Franklin Styer 

The camellia treasury by Mrs. Paul Kincaid, Hearthside Press, 
New York 1964. 

Here is a storehouse of information from which camellia 
growers, particularly new enthusiasts, can gather a concise 
background about camellias, from growing them in a garden 
or greenhouse to exhibiting specimens in a show. 

The first part of the book deals with camellia culture and, 
although Mrs. Kincaid knows her subject well, there is a 
deficit of instructions and illustrations of techniques, the serious 
gardener will want to read further, through the references of 
H'ume, Chidamian, and others. Mrs. Kincaid gardens and, 
for the most part, writes for gardeners living in the relatively 
mild-winter areas. However, she does mention those varieties 
of camellias that do well in colder climates such as confront 
gardeners in Philadelphia, New York, and lower New Eng- 
land. Those who have greenhouses will welcome the list of 
recommended varieties and how to grow them under these 
conditions. 

Perhaps, the best part of this book is the last for here 
Mrs. Kincaid has given into her ability as a skilled arranger. 
She apparently loves the camellia and has included many fine 
illustrations of its adaptability of both Oriental and Western 
arrangements: one is a moribana of sasanquas clumped at the 
base of airy heavenly bamboo and woodland ferns. The details 
for handling and exhibiting horticultural specimens as well 
as arrangement classes will be quite useful to flower show 
committees and exhibitors. 

Nancy G. Urian 

Shrub roses of today by Graham Stuart Thomas, St. Martin's 
Press, N. Y., 1962. 

This is a fine illustrated reference to the shrub roses which 
are once again returning to the gardener's favor. Mr. Thomas 
is one of Great Britain's experts on the culture and history 
of the old shrub roses. He believes that commercialism has 
pushed the beautiful hybrid teas and floribundas, but has 
neglected the others, thus denying gardeners the satisfaction 
of knowing the whole genus. He traces the shrub roses back 
to very early descriptions and points out their outstanding 
landscaping assets; unusual and striking foliage forms, autumn 
coloring, and rose hips or fruit. 

The author not only writes about old roses, he grows them 
in a nursery in Surrey. He also advises the National Trust 



about its gardens. The illustrations in this book, as in its 
predecessor. Old shrub roses, are exquisite, especially the 
delicate pencil drawings. It is a work of great merit. 

L. M. W. 

The care of the earth, by Russell Lord. New .\merican Library, 
Mentor Books, N. Y., 1962. 

Sometimes we forget that gardening as we practice it is 
a small segment of the much larger subject of man's relation 
to the earth. The word "care" in the title intrigued me, for 
at first it seemed poorly chosen. Yet, it is the correct word 
and explains the scope of the book's siubject: the nurturing of, 
the watching over, and the welfare of, the soil. 

This is a history of husbandry, beginning with the dawn 
of civilization and moving forward to present day .America. 
The breadth of the author's knowledge is vast. He has drawn 
not only from the Bible, Lavoisier, Malthus, Mendel, Darwin 
and others of the past whose contributions to soil conservation 
are noteworthy, but also from contemporary Americans such 
as L. H. Bailey, Bromfield, Tugwell and Wallace. In addition, 
the importance of the land grant colleges, the AAA and the 
CCC of the Roosevelt .Administration, and the policies of 
Ezra T. Benson during Eisenhower's presidency give the book 
an up-to-date viewpoint. 

Mr. Lord makes the reader understand that all of our 
technical knowledge and skill are of no avail if our soil is 
abused and mistreated. He recalls the lessons of the dust 
bowl of the 1930's and what we must do to prevent a recur- 
rence. Most of all, he succeeds in conveying a real sense of 
fear and misgiving about our future if we fail to care properly 
for our soil. Directly or indirectly the earth provides the 
food we must have for our existence. 

D. L. Taylor 

RECENT ACQUISITIONS 

The camellia treasury by Mrs. Paul Kincaid. 

The new field book of American wild flowers by Harold 
William Rickett. 

Orchids by John W. Blowers. 

The court-garden house by Norbert Schoenaiuer. 

Knowing your trees by G. H. Collingwood. 

For better gardens by Roland A. Browne. 

Bonsai for Americans by George F. Hull. 

The flower show Minnesota State Horticultural Society. 

Flowers in Glass by Julia S. Berrall. 

Plants of colonial days by Raymond L. Taylor. 

The secret life of the flower by Anne O. Dowden. 

The home book of herbs and spices by M. Miloradovich. 

Back of history by William Howells. 

The New York Times book of home landscaping ed. by Joan 
Lee Faust. 

The New York Times book of lawn care ed. by Joan Lee 
Faust. 

The New York Times book of trees and shrubs ed. by Joan 
Lee Faust. 

Colonial Williamsburg, its buildings and gardens by A. Law- 
rence Kocher & Howard Dearstyne. 

Hardy garden bulbs by Gertrude S. Wister. 

Gardening without poisons by Beatrice Trum Hunter. 



PROJECT 70-(Cont'd) 

In carrying out Project 70, the State will work in 
close cooperation with public and private prograins 
now underway or being planned. The largest specific 
programs now under consideration call for develop- 
ment of three recreational areas of national signifi- 
cance, two completely, and the third largely financed 
by the Federal Government. All will feature man- 
made lakes over 30 miles long. The Tocks Island 
Reservoir, proposed for construction immediately 
above the Delaware River Gap, is one of these areas. 



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BONSAI EXHIBIT 

On June 27 and 28 the Society, in cooperation 
with the Pennsylvania Bonsai Society, will stage 
a bonsai exhibit, the first of its kind in the Philadel- 
phia area. The exhibit is to be held in the Graff 
mansion (at the site of the old waterworks and 
aquarium just below the Art Museum) in Fairmount 
Park. It will be open from 10 to 6 on Saturday and 
from 11 to 5 on Sunday. Public admission will be 
25c and all members of both Societies will be admitted 
free of charge. 

This exhibit will provide an opportunity to learn 
more about the training and culture of dwarfed trees 
and shrubs. Mrs. W. R. Mackinney, Chairman of the 
Exhibit, has arranged to have growers on hand 
throughout both days to give information to interested 
visitors. There will be an educational exhibit showing 
some of the techniques involved in wiring, pruning 
and root pruning, and all the plants shown will be 
clearly labeled and accompanied by a brief history. 

In addition, the Philadelphia Chapter of Ikebana 
International will stage an exhibit of Japanese flower 
arrangements. 

Members wishing to show plants or to help with 
staging and staffing the exhibit are invited to contact 
Mrs. Hett, horticultural secretary, at the Society office, 
LO 3-7185. While no competition is planned, the 
committee must be prepared in advance for all ex- 
hibits, and none can be accepted without prior 
registration. 



IRIS SHOW MAY 23, 1964 

The Delaware Valley Iris Society and the Penn- 
sylvania Horticultural Society will jointly sponsor 
a one-day iris show, Saturday, May 23, at St. Alban's 
Church. (Rt. 252 and Chapel Road just north of West 
Chster Pike) Newtown Square. The Show will be 
open to the public from noon to 8 P. M. 



PINE BARRENS TRIP 

Attendance is linnitecl and 
advance registration is required. 
Members only, no guests. 



Register by using the clip-out coupon. Please enclose check and 
mail to .^89 Suburban Station. Phila. 1Q103. Registrations accepted 
in the order received; confirmation by return post card. 



r 



Application with payment must reach the Pennsylvania 
Horticultural Society, 389 Suburban Station, Phila., Pa. 
19103 by the Tuesday preceding the visit day. 

CLINIC AND FIELD TRIP 
RESERVATION 

Please check 

D CHRYSANTHEMUM CUNIC 

May 26 1:30 P.M. $3.00 

D FIELD TRIP TO PINE BARRENS 

June 4 10:00 A.M. $2.00 

Name 

Address 

Telephone 



THE 



PENNSVLVANinP 



HORTICULTURAL 



SOCIETY 



1617 PENNSYLVANIA BOULEVARD 
PHILADELPHIA 3. PENNSYLVANIA 



HORr/£v 




maro* 



VOL V. No. 7 



JULY, 1964 



GARDENING WITH CHILDREN 



Gardening with children is essentially gardening 
with beginners. What the adult can do for the six 
to sixteen-year old, is to engage his interest in the 
natural world and to steer him towards fruitful 
results. Teen-agers are so sadly at the mercy of 
group fads that they can be extremely difificult to 
work with — unless one can make gardening a cult 
or fashion which "everyone does", or unless one can 
devise a way of relating the garden to school courses. 
With youngsters, who start by simply wishing to 
get into the act, it is much easier to collect little 
helpers. In fact, the little ones are so very eager that 
it can be a problem to keep up with them ! 

KEEP THE GARDEN SMALL 

The most constructive help one can give to any 
gardening child is a small plot — a very small plot 
of his own. Six by six feet is plenty big enough. 
Too much work can discourage anyone of any age. 
It is important that a beginner's garden should be a 
joy and not a wearisome burden. If the first garden 
year is a fruitful and happy one, the memory of that 
success will tide over the inevitable discouragements 
of later years. So when you are choosing a location 
for a child's garden, find him a place in the sun. That 
blank spot under the Norway maples is not for 
beginners! 

THE RIGHT TOOLS 

Good, sturdy tools — well-made ones that will 
stand up to hard work — are another essential. For- 
tunately, the basic tools — fork, rake, trowel and 
watering can — are made in youth sizes. Garden 
supply stores can order these for you if they do not 
have them on hand. And if you keep a plentiful 
supply of old newspapers, you can teach children to 
clean their tools after each use, so they will always be 
free from mud and rust. Groups of small children 
always quarrel over a tool if only one ; so it pays, 
wherever possible, to have separate tools for each 
child. The diflferent sets can be initialled or painted 
different colors. 

WHAT TO GROW 

Each spring, thousands of gardening children 
plant millions of radish seeds. And this is a good start- 
ing choice, for the seeds germinate in a few days, and 
in a matter of weeks there is the pride of being able 
to admire and eat "what I grew!" 

The great advantage of starting younger children 
on vegetables is that most vegetable seeds are com- 
paratively large and there is less danger of losing the 



seed by planting too deep or by excessive watering. 
Also, vegetables carry a direct appeal to the appetites 
of small children. The more food coming out of the 
garden the better. Onion sets, beans, peanuts (be sure 
to get unroasted peanuts from a seedsman) are easily 
handled by little fingers. Plants such as peppers and 
tomatoes (especially the small fruited tomatoes like 
red cherry, tiny Tim and yellow pear) are even easier, 
but no child should be denied the fascination of watch- 
ing seeds germinate. Leaf lettuce and Swiss Chard 
grow quickly, anl like mint and parsley, will give a 
child something to nibble on. 

The older child, who has begun to grasp after 
beauty, will want a "pretty" garden. Here, pansy 
plants will give immediate effect. Of the flower seeds, 
marigolds and zinnias are nearest to fool-proof. They 
will produce cut flowers after the pansies have passed. 
For late season bloom, dwarf dahlias are recommend- 
ed. Nasturtiums, with their very large seeds, are ideal 
for sandy seashore soils ; but they may be difificult 
where the soil is richer. 

OTHER PROJECTS 

The child who has already had vegetable and 
flower gardens may become interested in growing 
other things — such as pumpkins for Halloween (these 
take space), sunflowers for birdseed, gourds from 
which to make little bowls and dippers, and lavender 
and roses for a pot-pourri. He may want to try the 
plants he has heard of in his school geography — rice, 
wheat, cotton. He may research the origin of every 
tree, shrub and flowering plant on the family property. 
Or he may bring his rabbit hutch into the garden and 
start growing carrots and clover. Some of his ideas, 
such as putting corn and lima beans into the same 
row to grow succotash, will seem unorthodox — until 
you remember that that may be the way the Indians 
did it. 

For the teen-ager who has started science in 
school, the garden can afford a variety of practical 
applications. The child who has sniffed astronomy 
may construct a sundial. The geometry student may 
lay out a pattern garden or map the home grounds. 
The youthful biologist may attempt to dose the family 
with herb teas, or to grow sensitive plant and gas 
plant for experimental work. He might try grafting 
or hybridizing — what one of the Society's youthful 
members used to call "high-breeding" when he asked 
for information over the telephone. The child who 
keeps asking "Why?" can make soil tests and experi- 

(Cont'd on page 3) 



HOLLY SOCIETY SPONSORS 
NEW CHECK LIST 

Holly culture since World War II has made re- 
markable strides. Hundreds of growers find hollies 
in demand and in many cases have introduced their 
own varieties. Landscape designers and home garden- 
ers are understandably bewildered over the many 
varieties available today. To simplify this state of 
affairs, the Holly Society of America is supporting the 
compiling of a directory of all names applied to hollies. 

Assembling accurate information and checking 
sources will require two years, according to Jackson 
M. Batchelor, Holly Society President. Already pre- 
pared is a card file containing more than 1,000 names. 
This is an increase of 150% above the out-of-print 
list published by the Holly Society in 1953. 

Work is progressing on three fronts ; at the U. S. 
National Arboretum in Washington, at the Bailey 
Hortorium at Cornell University, and at the Massa- 
chusetts Horticultural Society in Boston. The exten- 
sive nursery catalogue files of these horticultural cen- 
ters are being scrutinized for historical data on holly 
culture from Colonial times to the present day. 

Aside from the half dozen imported varieties of 
the "evergreen European holly" (Ilex Aquifolium), 
the first holly variety offered in this country seems 
to have been the littleleaf Japanese holly, Ilex crenata 
microphylla, listed by Parson's Kissena Nurseries of 
Flushing "near New York", in the 1880's. A fine hedge 
of this variety, planted at about that time, is still to be 
seen at Rohallion, the home of Dr. and Mrs. A. J. 
Pisani of Rumson, N. J. 

Nurserymen who have introduced new holly va- 
rieties into commerce are urged to notify Robert B. 
Clark, Bailey Hortorium, 467 Albert R. Mann Hall, 
Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14850, so that 
their holly introductions may be correctly reported 
in the new holly list. This list will benefit nurserymen 
and plant buyers because it will be a complete, au- 
thoritative alphabetical directory of hollies, as well 
as a listing of nurseries that originated, introduced 
and grew hollies. Dr. Clark is the vice chairman of 
the Committee on the Holly Check List. 



TOMATO TIP . . . 

If you saved your old nylons as we advised in 
January, use them now to tie up your tomato plants. 
Mrs. James C. Hornor, who gives this tip, recommends 
cutting the nylons into strips and, using a slip or 
granny knot, attaching the main stem and branches to 
the support. 



SUMMER FIELD TRIPS PLANNED 

The opportunity to visit two places of exceptional 
horticultural interest becomes available to members 
in July. The first trip will be to the Brooklyn Botanic 
Garden, where a tour will be conducted by Miss 
Elizabeth Scholtz, a member of the staff of the 
Garden's Education Department. 

The tour will include the Phipps and Holsten 
bonsai collections, the Fragrance Garden, the lily 
pools, the Rose Garden, the Japanese Garden and the 
newly built replica of the famous 500 year-old Ryoanji 
stone garden in Kyoto. 

The trip will be made in a chartered bus, which 
will leave from the Kennedy Boulevard entrance of 
the Suburban Station Building at 9 A. M. on Saturday, 
July 11. The return trip will arrive in Philadelphia at 
about 8:30 P. M. Luncheon will be available at the 
Brooklyn Museum. Advance registration is required. 
Members may bring guests. Travel fee: $6.00 
(Guests $8.00) 

The second trip will be to the Duke Gardens in 
Somerville, New Jersey. It is scheduled for Thursday, 
July 30. 

The gardens, which were opened in February, 
are among the largest under glass in the United 
States. Covering a full acre, they are divided into 
separate sections in a huge rectangular greenhouse 
with doors and partitions between to insure mainte- 
nance of proper temperatures required for the plant- 
ings in each. Italian, French, English, Indian, Chinese, 
Japanese and Hawaiian gardens are among those that 
make up the whole impressive display. 

The bus will leave the Suburban Station Building 
at 10:30 A.M. and will return by 4:30. Bring box 
lunch. Fee: (including admission to the gardens) 
Members $4.00, Guests $6.00. 

Please use the reservation blank on the back page 
of the NEWS if you plan to go. 



"A full history of noxious insects hurtful in the field, 
garden and house, suggesting all the known and 
likely means of destroying them, would be allowed 
by the public to be a most useful and important 
work. What knowledge there is of this sort lies 
scattered, and wants to be collected; great im- 
provements would soon follow of course. A knowl- 
of the properties, economy, propagation, and in 
short of the life and conversation of these animals, 
is a necessary step to lead us to' some method of 
preventing their depredations." 

Letter #34 by Gilbert White of Selborne, 

March 30, 1771 

(quoted in Gardening IVitfiouf Poisons 
by Beatrice Trvm Hunter) 



1965 FLOWER SHOW 

HORTICULTURAL CLASSES 

March 7-13, 1965 



SUNDAY 
Class 

600 



TRUMPET NARCISSUS (Division Ic), Beersheba, 
forced and shown in an 8 inch bulb pan. 

601 SMALL CUPPED NARCISSUS (Division Illb), 
Aflame, forced and shown in an 8 inch bulb pan. 

602 HYACINTH, Queen of the Blues, forced and shown 
in an 8 inch bulb pan. 

603 HANGING BASKET with flowering plant(s), con- 
tainer not to exceed 12 inches. 

604 BONSAI, medium sized, vertical dimension including 
container over 6 inches but not exceeding IS inches, 
a. Evergreen b. Deciduous 

605 ESPALIER, a pot grown woody plant, trained on a 
portable frame or trellis. Space allowed, 3 feet wide by 
4 feet high. 

606 STRAWBERRY JAR, planted at least thirty days prior 
to show with exhibitor's choice of plants (of one or 
more kinds). 

607 BROMELIADS, one or more permitted. To be ex- 
hibited on their own mounting. May not be hung. Space 
allowed, 3 feet wide by 4 feet high. 

608 SPECIMEN FERN, tropical or subtropical species, 
container IS inches or less if pot grown. If grown on 
bark or wood, support should not exceed 12 inches in 
width. 

609 A LIVING EXHIBIT OF HORTICULTURAL 
MERIT OR INTEREST containing one or more plants 
grown by the exhibitor and not exceeding 4 feet in 
height or 3 feet in width. 

610 MINIATURE ORCHID, total height of plant and con- 
tainer, 6 inches or less, excluding inflorescence. 

WEDNESDAY 
Class 

700 LARGE CUP NARCISSUS (Division Ila) Scarlet 
Elegans, forced and shown in an 8 inch bulb pan. 

701 CYCLAMINEUS NARCISSUS (Division VI), Peeping 
Tom, forced and shown in an 8 inch bulb pan. 

702 HYACINTH, LTnnocence, forced and shown in an 
8 inch bulb pan. 

703 TULIP, Orange Nassau, forced and shown in an 8 
inch bulb pan. 

704 HANGING BASKET, container 8 inches or less, with 
foliage or flowering plant (s). 

705 BONSAI, over IS inches high including container, 
a. Evergreen b. Deciduous 

706 WINDOW SILL COLLECTION, a group of indoor 
plants suitable for a window garden, grown and shown 
by one to three exhibitors. To be staged at standard 
sill height. Space to be filled 3' 10" wide, 12" deep, 4' 
high. 

707 TOPIARY SPECIMEN, not to exceed 3 feet in width. 
Planted and trained by exhibitor. (Rooted plants to fill 
in may be bought up to one week before show.) 

a. Animal or bird form, 

b. Other than a. 

708 SPECIMEN AZALEA, any variety forced into bloom, 
pot size not to exceed 12 inches. 

709 SPECIMEN GESNERIAD, in bloom, container 8 
inches or less. Hanging baskets not permitted. 

710 MINIATURE LANDSCAPE OR GARDEN, contain- 
ing three or more plant species, largest dimension not to 
exceed 2-% feet. 

711 SPECIMEN ORCHID 

a. Cattleya b. Phalaenopsis c. Vanda 

712 SEMI-DWARF GERANIUM, ut to 8 inches not in- 
cluding container. 

FRIDAY 
Class 

800 TRIANDRUS NARCISSUS (Division V), Thalia, 
forced and shown in an 8 inch bulb pan. 

801 LARGE CUP NARCISSUS (Division lib), Mrs. R. O. 
Backhouse, forced and shown in an 8 inch bulb pan. 



Gardening With Children— (Cont'd) 

ment with the effect of different fertilizers. For the 
meticulous child, there is the busy job of recording 
weather data and blossoming dates, as those eminent 
gardeners Washington and Jefferson did in their 
diaries. For the mechanically inclined, there is always 
the fascination of constructing water gardens. At 
quite an early age the child who is keenly observant 
can begin to collect dried herbarium specimens. And 
there is no reason why such a collector should not 
learn to mount his specimens correctly on museum- 
sized sheets from the very beginning. Such a collector 
may also wish to grow many species and varieties of 
one particular genus. 

NAMES CAN BE FUN 

It is always worth encouraging the young horti- 
culturist to learn the botanical names for plants, and 
to make labels for the family place. The really en- 
thusiastic linguist may even want labels in French or 
German as well as in Latin and English. 

Between what goes into the garden and what 
comes out of it, the pace for grownups can be dizzy. 
But to maintain a child's interest, the garden must 
grow and change with the child. Childrens' attention 
spans tend to be short. Alternation of short projects 
maintains interest without boredom — a bit of weed- 
ing, a bit of flower arranging, a bit of raking the 
garden paths and a bit of herbarium collecting, then 
finally back to the weeding. And changing the job 
helps when very small children start squabbling. Above 
all the important thing when working with young 
beginners is to keep the projects small, so that they 
can be finished without exhaustion. 

To the adult gardener — who struggles ever 
towards the ideal of what the garden should be — it 
can be a joyful relaxation to pause and participate in 
a child's vision of what a garden could be. The wise 
adult will prepare for the varied questions which pop 
and hop by keeping on hand a garden encyclopedia. 
Then, he can always answer, "Let's look it up!" 



802 HYACINTH, Pink Pearl, forced and shown in an 8 
inch bulb pan. 

803 MUSCARI (Grape Hyacinth), Armeniacum, forced and 
shown in a 6 inch bulb pan. 

804 HANGING BASKET, with foliage plant(s), container 
12 inches or less. 

805 STANDARD, a woody plant trained as a standard. 

806 SPECIMEN BEGONIA, rhizomatous, in container 8 
inches or less. 

807 SUCCULENT GARDEN, collection, to be planted in 
a container the largest dimension of which must not 
exceed 18 inches. 

808 FLOWERING PLANT suitable for indoor culture in 
container 8 inches or less. 

809 PLANT(S) FOR TERRACE DECORATION, in a 
single container not to exceed 3 feet in any dimension. 
Must be assembled at least one week before the show. 
To be judged for suitability and decorative effect. Plants 
need not have been grown by exhibitor. 

810 MINIATURE BONSAI, largest dimension, including 
container, not to exceed 6 inches. 

811 ORCHID COLLECTION, two or more species to 
cover an area 3' x 2'. Ferns and foliage plants may be 
used. 



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LIBRARY NOTES 

Let's Grow Lilies! An illustrated Handbook of Lily Culture 

by the North American Lily Society — 1964. Pictures and 

Text by Virginia Howe. 

If you are intrigued by the beauty of lilies, yet have n^ever 
grown them successfully; if other lily books seem too formid- 
able, technical or pedantic, try Virginia Howe's new booklet 
"Let's Grow Lilies!" prepared for the North American Lily 
Society. In only fifty pages, all the information the amateur 
both accurate and complete, this authoritative handbook is also 
readable and instructive. The style is lucid, the illustrations 
copious and to the point. 

In this excellent book all aspects of lily culture are clearly 
set forth. There is also a good brief bibliography as well as a 
clear glossary of terms so that the reader can become readily 
familiar with "lily language". This is a much needed, invaluable 
book. 

George R. Glark 

The new small garden by Lady Allen of Huntwood and Susan 

Jellicoe, Architectural Press, London 1956. 

Tbis little book, in scale with the size of the gardens it 
describes, is so full of ideas that even the most imaginative 
gardener will be prodded into creative gardening planning. 
The introduction is exceptional", it points out the qualities 
which make one garden look like tbe work of inspiration and 
the next one look haphazard. 

The authors have used some 20 actual gardens to show 
the many diverse ways in which a small area can be used to 
satisfy each owner's use and pleasure in his garden. A fore- 
warning: the illustrations are black-and-white and minute and 
it takes real squinting to catch all the details. But even this 
hinderance does not take away the excitement of a small garden 
that these two English ladies have ably conveyed. 

N. G. U. 

Hardy garden bulbs by Gertrude S. Wister, Dutton, New York 
1964. 

The beginning gardener and even the advanced gardener 
who wants to proceed further than King Alfred daffodils and 
Red Emperor tulips can profit from Mrs. Wister's book. It is 
direct, factual and decidedly practical. The drawings, and 
photographs too, are clear and helpful. From the introductory 
chapter, "A First Lesson on Bulbs", to the bibliography en- 
titled, "Good Winter Reading", all the essentials of growing 
brulbs indoors and in the garden can be found. 

The author is a well-known plantswoman. Those who 
visited Dr. and Mrs. Wister's garden with the Society early 
in th€ spring will doubly enjoy this useful book. 

E. L. S. 



Recent Acquisitions 

Alpine Plants by David Wooster. 1874. 

Gardening with Native Plants. Brooklyn Botanic Garden 
Handbook No. 38. 

Gentians for Your Garden by Doretta Klaber. 

Garden Plants in Japan by Fumio Kitamura and Yurio Ishizu. 

Catalogue of an Exhibition of Contemporary Botanical Art 
and Illustration, 6 April to 1 September 1964, at the Hunt 
Botanical Library, Pittsburgh. 

Huntia, No. 1. A Yearbook of Botanical and Horticultural 
Bibliography, Hunt Botanical Library, Pittsburgh. 



Chrysanthemum Show Schedules 

are available upon request to anyone interested in the 
1964 Show, to be staged at the American Baptist 
Convention, King of Prussia Park, Valley Forge, on 
October 31 and November 1, 1964. 



r" 



FIELD TRIP RESERVATION 

Please accept my reservation for the following field 
trip (s) : 

Saturday, July 11, 1964 
D BROOKLYN BOTANIC GARDEN 
MemberB $6.00; Guests $8.00 

Thursday, July 30, 1964 
D DUKE GARDENS, Somerville, N. J. 
Member $4.00; Guests $6.00 

Name 

Street 

City & State 

Telephone 

Register by using the chp-out coupon. Please enclose 
check and mail to The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society, 
389 Suburban Station Bldg., Phila. 19103. 



THE PENNSYLVANIA^ 

HORTICULTURAL . 
SOCIETJftwi 1 




VOL V. 

^1 


N 


0. 8 

m 


AUGUST, 1964 


I6i7 PENNSYLVANIA BOULEVARD 1 
PHILADELPHL^ 3, PENNSYLVANIA H 


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BONSAI SHOW A SUCCESS 



Bonsai are trees and shrubs pruned, trained and planted to resemble natural specimens . . . a juniper in the high 
Sierras, gnarled and tivisted by the mountain storms; a cypress from the seacoast swept by the ocean gales; an elm in 
a peaceful valley, stately and symmetrical. While some suggest saplings in the spring, most are designed to create the 
impression of venerable age. Above all, they should be balanced, pleasingly proportioned and beautiful ... a form of 
living sculpture. 

The practice of bonsai began in China about 1000 A.D. and tvas Utter taken up and perfected in Japan. Now 
countless Americans are becoming interested in the ancient art. 

Explanatory Statement 
displayed at Bonsai Show 



The bonsai show sponsored jointly by the Penn- 
sylvania Horticultural Society and the Pennsylvania 
Bonsai Society on June 27 and 28 attracted gratifying 
attention from exhibitors and spectators alike. More 
than 175 bonsai were displayed by growers, most of 
whom were residents of the Delaware Valley. Approx- 




Mrs. J. J. Willaman and Mrs. Otto F. Haas, admiring some 
of the exhibits at the show. 

imately 1200 visitors paid a modest admission fee 
to see the display. 

The show was held in the Grafif Mansion at the 
site of the old aquarium in Fairmount Park. The 
plants were exhibited in the ballroom of the Mansion, 
and commercial booths were set up on the porch 
overlooking the Fairmount dam. There was an edu- 









Mrs. W. R. Mackinney of Media, show chairman, directing 
placement of labels. Mr. Mackinney and Mrs. Ballard are 
on hand. 

cational exhibit prepared by Robert E. Montgomery, 
President of the Bonsai Society and also a display 
by the Philadelphia chapter of Ikebana International. 

The growing public interest in bonsai was appar- 
ent not only in the attendance but also in the numer- 
ous requests for information and advice with which 
the hosts and hostesses were besieged. While some 
questions reflected no more than casual curiosity, 
most indicated that bonsai can be expected to play 
a large part in the Society's activity in the years to 
come. 



LAWN MAKING TIME HERE 

August is the time to redo lawns. There are two 
important reasons for this. By August, most weed 
seeds have germinated, among them crabgrass, one 
of the most persistent of annual weeds. Thus, there 
will be a minimum of competition for the seedling 
grass. Also grass seed germinates quickly in the 
autumn nights. It is then well-established by the 
following spring when competition with weeds be- 
comes keen. 

The Society library contains much reliable and 
accurate information on lawn-making. Extension 
service booklets, USDA pamphlets, and numerous 
books describe the procedures in detail, set forth the 
pros and cons of various techniques and seed mixtures, 
and give recommendations for the control of pests 
and diseases. A summary of this material is presented 
below. 

Preparing the seed bed 

The seed bed should be thoroughly prepared. 
This is the key to lasting success. All the work need 
not be done in a day, or even a week, but it should 
be completed by September 1. The first step is to 
remove all traces of bent grass, quack grass and 
nimblewill, and the roots and rhizomes of perennial 
weeds. (This material makes excellent compost). 
Then test for lime requirement. We recommend using 
your County Agent — his test is reliable and free. A 
complete test will determine fertilizer requirements 
and will indicate the amount of organic matter present. 
If the content is low, the tester will recommend addi- 
tions. (Extension bulletins suggest reed sedge or moss 
peat, rotted sawdust or manure.) Testing kits are avail- 
able from the County Agent for a small fee. When the 
ground has been cleared of all growing plants, apply 
superphosphate (0-20-0) or phosphate-potash (0-20-20) 
at the rate of 50 lbs. per thousand square feet. Apply 
powdered limestone, if needed, at the recommended 
rate. Also, if needed, organic matter should be added 
at this time. 

Next, roto-till or cultivate to a depth of 6 inches. 
Most garden supply stores have suitable machines 
for rent, or a contractor can be engaged to do the job. 
After the ground is thoroughly loosened, rake out all 
stones, plants and debris and level the area with a 
long board or ladder to assure a smooth surface. 

Seeding or sodding 

Most people know whether they want a quality 
lawn, uniform and weedfree, or a utilitarian lawn, neat 
and practical. The kind of grass determines the 
appearance and how difficult it is to maintain. 

If your lawn is sunny, well drained and important 
to you, there can be nothing finer than a pure stand 
of Merion bluegrass. But it requires a maximum of 
care. On the other hand, if your lawn is shaded, or 
if you have a lot of pets and children, or if you just 
don't want to spend the time and money to maintain 
Merion bluegrass, a mixture of bluegrass and Penn- 
lawn fescue is more practical. (The Extension bulle- 
tins give specific recommendations for these mixtures 



to suit various situations.) If your specifications call 
for a rough and ready field, Kentucky 31 fescue should 
be your choice. For instant results on a small area, 
buy Merion blue sod. 

Whichever grass is chosen, fertilizing and plant- 
ing procedures are the same. A starter fertilizer (10-6-4 
non-organic) should be spread over the entire area at 
the rate of 25 lbs. per thousand square feet. It will be 
needed immediately by the germinating seeds. Seed 
should be sown promptly, preferably the same day, 
and in any event, not later than three days after the 
fertilizer is applied. If Merion blue is used, 2 lbs. per 
thousand square feet is plenty. It germinates slowly 
and unevenly but will soon cover the area. Other 
varieties should be seeded at the rate recommended 
on the package. Seeding at an excessive rate does no 
good and can waste a good deal of money. After seed- 
ing, roll lightly, or stamp the area to press the seed 
into contact with the soil. Then water to wet the top 
one inch of soil. 

Mulching 

A very light mulch of clean straw or salt marsh 
hay may make the difference between success and 
failure. It protects the germinating grass from fatal 
drying out, and is thought to be well worth the extra 
trouble. One bale should be sufficient for five 
thousand square feet. 

Watering 

After it is once established, Merion bluegrass 
(and indeed most varieties of grass) does not need 
to be watered, except in times of serious drought. 
However, a new lawn from initial planting until the 
first frost, must never be allowed to dry out. Keep 
the soil surface damp. Deep watering is not necessary. 

Fall Care 

About three weeks after the grass has germinated, 
make another application of the 10-6-4 fertilizer at the 
rate of 10 lbs. per thousand square feet, and mow the 
grass to a height of two inches when it is three inches 
high. 

When the grass is well established, apply a slow- 
release turf fertilizer, following the manufacturer's 
directions. Apply this material again in early spring 
and again in late May. 

Costs 

Do-it-yourself gardeners are often unaware of the 
total cost of remaking a lawn. Estimates are apt to be 
based on the price of grass seed, without taking into 
account the larger cost of fertilizer. If labor is en- 
gaged at a rate of $3.00 an hour to help with the 
cleaning and raking, you will find that out-of-pocket 
costs come to about $40.00 a thousand square feet. 
If the entire job is handled by a landscape contractor, 
the cost will, of course, be very substantially higher. 

The cost of sodding will probably run two or 
three times as high. If you decide to use sod, it is 
important to buy it from a reputable dealer who will 
provide only the specified grass and will handle and 
plant it properly. 



A UNIQUE DEMONSTRATION GARDEN 

In the spring of 1963 the Neighborhood Garden 
Association of Philadelphia, in cooperation with the 
Extension Service, began the development of a 
Demonstration Garden, located at N. 38th and Mt. 
Vernon Streets in West Philadelphia. 

The garden is now completed and it has become a 
vital and constructive force in stimulating an interest 
in neighborhood improvement. People from every 
section of the city have visited this teaching garden 
and many have gone home with the thought, "We 
could do that on our block," or "I could have a garden 
like that." 

Half of the area is devoted to a series of small 
gardens, many being designed by the Garden Clubs 
which have worked with the Association since its 
founding in 1953. The other section is devoted to 
4-H Club Demonstration Projects. 

One of the Back Yard Gardens (The Gardeners) 
has been planned for a family with children and a 
dog. Railroad ties have been used to make a raised 
bed for flowers and shrubs and a dogwood tree. 
Another Back Yard Garden (Four Counties Garden 
Club) features a bird feeder and an evergreen vine 
trained as a tree. 

The Front Yard Gardens (Bala-Cynwyd, Mantua 
and Twin Valleys Garden Clubs) ofifer many practical 
suggestions for creating beauty along city streets. In 
the Shrub Garden (The Planters Garden Club) there 
are well chosen, carefully labeled shrubs suited to 
city conditions. 

The Rose Garden (Huntingdon Valley Garden 
Club) contains many lovely varieties. The attrac- 
tively designed Perennial Garden (The Weeders) con- 
tains an excellent collection of perennials suited to the 
city, and the little Herb Garden (Philadelphia Unit of 
the American Herb Society) is full of pungent herbs 
and attracts much attention. 

The terminal feature at the end of the long, 
flower-bordered path is surrounded with flower boxes 
(Providence Garden Club) and hanging baskets (The 
Evergreens). 

A Garden in a Box has been designed for the city 
dweller who has a small, paved back yard, and the 
Shady Garden ofifers many possibilities for the gar- 
dener who is faced with the problem of what to 
grow under such conditions. The Window Boxes on 
Parade feature plants suited to many locations and 
the Patio has an interesting array of plants in pots 
and containers. The Vacant Lot Garden shows what 
an asset a trash-filled lot can become when made into 
a community garden. 

In the area developed by the Extension Service 
there are 4-H Club Garden Projects : flower garden, 
vegetable garden, cut flower, turf and landscape 
projects have been demonstrated, and there is a straw- 
berry planter and even a pumpkin patch. 

As one of the visitors remarked, this unique 
demonstration garden is like a Flower Show which 
is not taken down at the end of the week. It is a 
garden which holds much of interest for lioth city 
and suburban gardeners. Visitors are always welcome. 



HORTICULTURIST JOINS STAFF 

Miss June M. Vail will join the staff of the Society 
on August 1, 1964. Her duties and responsibilities will 
be largely with members, whom she will serve by 
phone, mail and special consultation. 

Miss Vail graduated from the Pennsylvania 
School of Horticulture (now Ambler Campus of 
Temple University) in 1942. The following three 
years were spent in plant propagation at Ambler 
Nurseries. 

In 1945 she joined Miss 
Elizabeth C. White to work 
in the selection and propa- 
gation of holly and blue- 
berries. There at Whites- 
bog, New Jersey, her knowl- 
edge of native plant material 
became greatly enriched. 

In 1947, Miss Vail became 
a charter member of the 
Holly Society of America, 
Inc. and served on the Board 
Miss June M. Vail of Trustees from 1959 to 

1962. In 1951 she accepted the position of Secretary- 
Treasurer with the newly organized Holly-Haven, Inc. 
and also directed propagation in four greenhouses and 
four sash houses. Native plants, along with blue- 
berries and holly, were propagated there. 

Miss Vail has been vvith the W. Atlee Burpee 
Seed Company since February 1957 as a Horticultural 
Technician in the Customer Service Department 
answering gardening questions, giving garden club 
lectures, and noting flower and vegetable trials at the 
Fordhook Farm in Doylestown. 




HORTICULTURAL CONGRESS TO BE HELD 

The 19th American Horticultural Congress of the 
American Horticultural Society will be held Septem- 
ber 30 through October 3, 1964, at the Hotel Commo- 
dore in New York. 

The Congress will bring together leaders in the 
field of professional, educational, commercial and 
amateur horticulture for interchange of ideas, prob- 
lems and projects and for the improvement and benefit 
of the entire field. 

Special tours have been arranged to the New 
York Botanical Gardens, Brooklyn Botanic Gardens, 
Queens Botanical Gardens, Old Westbury Gardens, 
Planting Fields, Sterling Forest and the World's Fair. 

At the meetings, luncheons and dinners, talks 
will be given by prominent leaders on many popular 
and scientific subjects and exhibits of horticultural 
interest will be staged by member organizations. 

Additional information and registration forms are 
available from the office, LO 3-7185. 



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LIBRARY NOTES 



AUGUST BOOK SALE 

Extra copies of books in the Society's library 
that are not in use will be on sale during August. 
All members are invited to come in and look through 
the collection. The library is open daily, Monday 
through Friday, from 9:00 A.M. until 5:00'P.M. This 
is a good opportunity to enlarge your own gardening 
library at very reasonable prices. 

In general, these books date from the early part 
of the century up to the 1950's. Many contain land- 
scape and garden plans and ideas, lists of plants, and 
garden practices which might be adapted to today's 
gardens. Others are plant monographs which collec- 
tors will be interested in: iris, daffodils, hollies, del- 
phinium, azaleas, exotics and alpines. 

For 25c there is such entertaining reading as 
Herbst's New green world, Wright's The gardener's 
bed book, Mrs. Francis King's The little garden, and 
Bailey's How plants get their names. 

Others, ranging from $1.00 to $3.00, include The 
practical book of garden structure and design, Gardens 
— a notebook of plans and sketches. Patio gardens. 
Rock gardens, how to make and maintain them, Four 
seasons in the garden, Color planning of the garden. 
The world was my garden, and Camellias in America. 

The income from the book sale will be used to 
increase the Society's library which is valuable not 
only to our members but to all who seek the informa- 
tion of our specialized collection. 



Fruit and vegetable arrangements by Emma Hod- 
kinson Cyphers, Hearthside, New York 1963. 

This is a revised edition of the original book 
which Mrs. Cyphers wrote in 1955. It contains in- 
formation about suitable containers for arranging fruit 
and vegetables in, how to groom and prepare these 
materials for arranging, and how to compose them. 
The illustrations supplement the text and show the 
author's imaginative use of fruits, vegetables and 



grains. The glossary contains interesting legends and 
lists seasonal and keeping qualities of the fresh 
materials. 

Mrs. Ja mes C. Hornor 

Garden plants in Japan by Fumio Kitamura and Yurio 
Ishizo, the Society for International Cultural Rela- 
tions, Tokyo 1963. 

The descriptions and photographs of the 209 
selected plants included in this book are excellent. 
Each plant is clearly and concisely described to in- 
clude its habitat, character, ornamental value, and 
propagation. Many of these plants are, of course, avail- 
able in the United States and well-known to garden- 
ers. Not only travellers to the Orient but those inter- 
ested in plants here will find this a useful reference. 

Printed on the front end paper is a map of Japan 
which shows the various districts cited in the text 
and gives the climatic conditions relative to each 
district. 

Mrs. James C. Hornor 

Gentians for your garden by Doretta Klaber, Barrows, 

New York 1964. 

This is the first book about gentians to be written 
for American gardens. It is probably the most 
thorough covering of the species and has been written 
with enthusiasm and charmingly illustrated by the 
author. 

Mrs. Klaber has had vast gardening experience 
with gentians and assures us that they are easy to 
grow in cultivation. But even after her lucid and 
diagramatic cultural suggestions, those who have tried 
and failed will not be too convinced. Other gardeners 
who are willing to gamble with these lovely blue 
flowers or those who want to add to their own knowl- 
edge of plant material will be intently interested in 
these descriptions of gentians. A wide choice of 
species and varieties is offered and. what is greatly to 
the point, where to buy plants and seeds of them. 

Mrs. E. Florens Rivinus 



^'IBER, 1%4 




LIBRARY NOTES 

As a special introduction to the library in our 
new headquarters, we extend an invitation to you to 
borrow a book or two from the present location at 
the Suliurban Station Building between August 24 
and September 10. Any books taken out during that 
period will not he due until the second week of Oc- 
tober \\hen we will be established at 325 Walnut 
Street. Thus, when you return the books you will 
have an opportunity to visit our new library, browse 
through the collection, and read at one of the com- 
fortable study tables. Members are reminded that 
they may take out library books by telephone or 
letter as well as making selections in person from 
the open stacks. 



Hardy heaths; and some of their nearer allies 
Rev. ed. by A, T. Johnson, 1956. 

The heaths and heathers are largely terra incog- 
nita to the average gardener — unfamiliar, untried 
and underrated. Several seasons back this reviewer 
became interested in them through a chance encounter 
with A. T. Johnson's Hardy heaths. Since that time 
there has been a chance to try out a large group of 
these plants in the garden. They are beautiful, have 
a year-round range of bloom, are evergreen and varied 
in foliage, color and form. Finally, the heathers otTer 
a great variety of landscape uses. Some forms pro- 
vide good facing for azaleas, rhododendrons and other 
acid-loving plants. Some make lovely ground-cover 
or carpeting plants in sun or shade and they are in 
some ways superior even to box for hedges or edgings 
from 3" to 3', furnish a variety of miniature land- 
scape forms for the rock garden, look well as accent 
shrubs in a mixed border, and can substitute for turf 
in walks and lawns. All this amounts to a consider- 
able landscaping palette for gardeners with acid soil. 

The book by Mr. Johnson is a full and reliable 
guide to heaths and heathers. During the past year 
or so I have felt it necessary to reread this book three 
times — which is twice more than usual for me. Each 
time something new makes its impression. This time 
it is the heath walk (I am installing one) ; last time 
it was the colored-leaved, exotic and "tree" heaths 
(which I am looking for). Do allow yourself the 
pleasure of acquaintance with this fine book, and 
with the tribe of plants which are its subject. 

R.L.C. 



PHS SCHEDULE OF EVENTS - 1964-1965 

Other field trips and special meetings may be 
arranged from time to time. All clinics will be de- 
scribed in detail two months in advance and will 
require registration. Where more than one session 
in a day is scheduled, the additional sessions are 
repeats of the first. 

Sept. 23 Clinic: Forcing Bulbs for Home and Show 
10:30 A.M. and 7:30 P.M. 
30 Dedication of New Headquarters: Open 
House: 2:30 P.M. 



Oct. 6 Member's Evening: "Treasures from garden, 
field and forest; can they be saved?" Ruth 
Mc V.Allen: 7:30 P.M. 
7, 14 Propagation Clinics: Gordon Tyrrell 
2:00 P.M. and 7:30 P. M. 
1 1 Garden Visits 
21, 28 Bonsai Clinics: Robert E. Montgomery 

10:30 A. M., 2:00 P. M., 7:30 P. M. 
15,22,29 Eight Part Course: Plants & Environment 
Dr. John M. Fogg, Jr. 10:00 A.M. 
31 Chrysanthemum Show 

Nov. 1 Chrysanthemum Show 

3 Member's Evening: "The Art of Training 
Plants" Ernesta D. Ballard 7:30 P.M. 
5,12,19 Course: Plants and Environment 
10:00 A.M. 
4, 11 Bonsai Clinics: 10:00 A.M., 2:00 & 7 :30 P.M. 
10 Clinic: Topiary Ivy - Ernesta D. Ballard 

10:30 A.M. 
18 Annual Dinner Meeting - Edmund Bacon, 

guest speaker: 6:30 P.M. 
21 Field Trip: New Jersey Silica Sand Co., 
Holly Orchard, Millville, New Jersey 

Dec. 1 Christmas Wreath-making Clinic : 
June M. Vail: 10:30 A.M. 
1 Member's Evening: "More Plants For Man" 
Dr. Walter H. Hodge: 7:30 P.M. 
2, 9 Propagation Clinic: Dr. John M. Swartley 

10:30 A.M. 
3, 10 Course: Plants and Environment 

10:00 A.M. 
9-11 Christmas Show 



LIBRARY NOTES (cont'd) 

This View of Life - George Gaylord Simpson. Har- 
court, Grace & World, 285 pp. $5.95. 

Professor Simpson's view is that of a biologist 
and an evolutionist. His purpose is to give the lay 
reader an understanding of the implications of the 
modern life sciences, much as Eddington and Jeans 
tried a generation ago to popularize the meanings of 
modern physics. And though there is nothing as 
dramatic in biology as e=mc^, the developments in 
the last 30 years in our knowledge of the tiny world 
of the cell and the infinitely larger world of the 
species are radical and important. 

The book will be of unusual interest to Society- 
members. Of all lay readers, horticulturalists are 
probably best equipped to understand what Professor 
Simpson is talking about. The so-called "synthetic 
theory" which today's evolutionists have built on 
genetics and statistics draws heavily on concepts 
familiar to any gardener. Variation, i.e., differences 
bet\\Ten individuals, is seen as the result of recombin- 
ation of genes (a commonplace in hybridizing) and 
of mutation (an everyday example is 'Merion' blue- 
grass). Adaption is viewed as a consequence of 
natural selection, the survival of the fittest. But the 
modern emphasis is not on the survival of individuals 
but of populations, and by survival is meant not the 
longevity of a single generation, but the ability of 
each generation to reproduce itself. These ideas will 
be readily assimilated Ijy anyone who has had expe- 
rience in sowing seeds by the package. 

The text is loosely organized (actually it is simply 
a series of papers originally written for separate pre- 
sentation, and its middle chapters bog down a bit in 
the author's zeal to expose and discredit anti-evolu- 
tionists. But the opening chapters, which explain 
evolution, and the closing ones, which deal with the 
possibility of life on other planets and with the 
evolutionary failure of man, are engrossing reading. 
Professor Simpson is not as concerned as many 
authorities over the genetic "load" (the number of 
harmful genes) which man is accumulating by medical 
progress. What worries him is the thought that if 
natural selection means the survival of those popula- 
tions which reproduce most successfully, the Latin 
Americans, the Africans, and above all the Chinese 
will inherit the earth. And in his view it may well 
be an earth where everyone is on the verge of 
starvation. 

F. L.B. 



"There were large exhibits of grapes. In 
native grapes the following varieties were staged: 
Isabella, Bland, Powell, Catawba, Edinborough, 
and Norton's seedling. In foreign grapes, outdoor 
culture: Black Hamburg, Hansteretto, Golden 
Chasselas, White Gascolgne, Muscat of Alexan- 
dria." September 1844. 

A history of the Penna. Horticultural Society. 



Jan. 5 Member's Evening: Home Greenhouse Sym- 
posium: 7:30 P. M. 
13, 20, Herbaceous Border Clinics: Mrs. Edward 

27 J. Garra: 10:30 A.M. 
12, 19 Propagation Clinics: June M. Vail 
10:30 A.M. 
14 Espalier Clinic : Benjamin Palmer 
7:30 P.M. 



Feb. 2 Member's Evening: "Wild Flowers of Bow- 
man's Hill & Pennsylvania" - David Benner 
7:30 P.M. 
3, 10 Herbaceous Border Clinics: 10:30 A.M. 
9 Phytoillumination Clinic : Ernesta D. 
Ballard: 10:30 A. M. and 7:30 P. M. 
15 Alpines Clinic: Rex Murfitt: 7:30 P.M. 
17 Cooperative program with Women's Com- 
mittee University Museum : "Floral decora- 
tions inspired by Museum Treasures" 
Julia S. Berrell: 10:30 A. AI. 
23 Propagation Clinics : Roy Kersey 
10:30 A.M. and 7:30 P.M. 



Mar. 2 Member's Evening: Conservation Film, 
"The City and the Pond": 7:30 P. M. 
3 Propagation Clinics: Roy Kersey 

10:30 A. M. and 7:30 P.M. 
9 Indoor Plants Clinic: Ernesta D. Ballard 
10:30 A.M. and 7:.30 P. M. 

23 Spring Luncheon 

24 Holly Culture Clinic: June M. Vail 

7:30 P.M. 



Apr. 6 Member's Evening: "Insect and Disease 
Control on Ornamentals" - Dr. Wallace 
H. Windus: 7:30 P.M. 
20 Chrysanthemum Clinic: Mrs. Geo. Stott 
1 :30 P. M. 
7, 14, Bonsai Clinics : Robert E. Montgomery 
21, 28 10:30 A.M., 1 :30 P.M. & 7:30 P. M. 

23. 24 Daffodil Show 

27 Bowman's Hill Field Trip 



May 5 Wild Flower Gardening Clinic: 
Mrs. Jesse Vodges: 10:30 A.M. 

10 Irish Garden Tour 

13 Field Trip to Henry Foundation 

18 Field Trip to Bowman's Hill 

23, 24 Iris Show 

25 Chrysanthemum Clinic 



June 3 Field Trip to Pine Barrens 

8, 15, Lawn Symposium in cooperation with Penn. 

22. 29 State Extension Service: 7:30 P.M. 

19, 20 Bonsai Show 

26 Plant Exchange 

26, 27 Lily Show 



GARDEN CLINIC SCHEDULE 
FOR FALL AND EARLY WINTER 

The clinics committee, headed this year by Mrs. 
George E. De Coursey, has completed arrangements 
for the year's program. Eight series are scheduled 
in order to give greater coverage to the subject. Most 
of the clinics will involve member participation and 
will stress techniques and methods. Unless other- 
wise stated, all the clinics will be held in the basement 
classroom of the new building at 325 Walnut Street. 

Bulb Forcing — Wednesday, September 23, 10:30 
A.M. and 7:30 P.M. 

This clinic will include discussion and demonstra- 
tions of bulb forcing. The instructors, each of whom 
has been outstandingly successful in forcing bulbs for 
both show and home enjoyment, will tell about their 
methods and facilities for storing and forcing pans. 
Special emphasis will be given to producing specimens 
for the 1965 Philadelphia Flower Show, and each 
])articipant will plant a pan of tulips, a pan of daffo- 
dils, a pan of hyacinths and a pan of muscari con- 
forming to the schedule of the 1%5 Show. The in- 
structors will be Mrs. Edward M. Cheston, Mrs. J. 
Pancoast Reath, and Mrs. W, R. Mackinney. Fee. 
including materials : $8.50. (The evening session is 
a repeat of the morning clinic.) 

Propagation of woody plants — Wednesdays, October 
7 and 14, 2:00 P. M. and 7:30 P. M. 

A series of two clinics covering methods for 
propagating woody plants, both deciduous and ever- 
green, will be presented in October by a well-known 
horticulturist. Time, selection of cutting wood, mak- 
ing of cuttings, rooting media, chemical treatments, 
insertion, care and handling after potting will be 
covered. Following a demonstration, each partici- 
pant will prepare a flat of cuttings under the super- 
\ision of the instructor. Flats, medium, and cuttings 
will be provided, and proper knives will be available 
at additional cost. Instructor: Gordon Tyrrell, Direc- 
tor of Gardens, Winterthur, Delaware. Fee: $4.00. 
(The evening sessions are a repeat of the afternoon 
clinics.) Registrations accepted for the series only. 

Plants and Environments — Thursdays, October 15, 
22, 29, November 5, 12, 19, December 3 and 10, 10:00 
A. M. 

Consideration of the principal factors such as 
temperature, rainfall, light, soil, etc.. which determine 
the distribution of plants in the wild state as well as 
their successful cultivation in our gardens. Emphasis 
will be given to an analysis of those events in the 
history of our planet which have brought about the 
present complex i)attern of plant distribution. The 
major vegetational divisions of North American and 
other continents will be descril)ed from the point of 
view of their adaptation to their environment as well 
as their contribution to our horticulture. 



The series of eight clinics will be conducted by 
Dr. John M. Fogg, Jr., Director of the Morris Arbor- 
etum. Registration for the series only. Fee: $16.00. 

Theory and technique of Bonsai — Wednesdays, Oc- 
tober 21, 28, November 4, 11, 10:30 A.M., 2:00 P.M. 
and 7:30 P.M. 

This course on the fundamentals and special 
techniques in the art of growing miniature potted 
trees and shrubs will come as a welcome innovation 
in the Society's program. Offered in answer to many 
requests, it is expected to be very popular, and mem- 
bers are urged to register early. The morning series 
is planned for beginners, the afternoon and evening 
series (which are identical) are for members with 
some knowledge of the art. Each participant will 
train one tree and make a group planting which will 
then be his or hers to take home. Registration for 
the series only. Instructor: Robert E. Montgomery, 
President. Pennsylvania Bonsai Society. Fee: (in- 
cluding materials) $12.00. 



Register by using the clip-nut coupon. Please enclose check 
and mail to 38Q Suburban Station Building, Phila. 10103. 
Registrations accepted in the order received: confirmation by 
return post card. 



GARDEN CLINIC RESERVATION 

(Please circle time for which 
registration is being made.) 

n BULB FORCING 

Wednesday, September 23 10:30 A.M. 

7:30 P.M. $8.50 

D PROPAGATION OF WOODY PLANTS 
Wednesday, October 7, 14 2:00 P.M. 

7:30 P.M. $4.00 

D PLANTS AND ENVIRONMENT 
Thursday, October 15, 22, 29 
Thursday, November 5, 12, 19 
Thursday, December 3, 10 10:00 A.M. $16.00 

D THEORY & TECHNIQUE OF BONSAI: 
BEGINNERS 
Wednesday, October 21, 28 
Wednesday, November 4, 11 10:30 A. M. $12.00 

D THEORY & TECHNIQUE OF BONSAI 
Wednesday, October 21, 28 
Wednesday, November 4, 11 2:00 P. M. 

7:30 P.M. $12.00 

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Multi-flora tuberous begonias growing in a location 
which gets full sun for five hours each day. Tubers were 
started in flats of peat and sand indoors in April. This 10" 
pot contains four plants. 



PHILADELPHIA FLOWER SHOW 

The Philadelphia Flower Show will not be held 
in the spring of 1965 and probably not in 1966 
in the form we have known it in the past. The 
Exhibition Hall adjacent to the Comnnercial Mu- 
seunri, the traditional site for the show, is being 
rebuilt, and the Philadelphia Flower Show, Inc. 
has decided to suspend it until the work is done, 
probably in 1967. 

During the suspension, the Society will make 
every effort to afford its membership an oppor- 
tunity to visit a major show. Possible locations and 
occasions for the exhibits and competitions which 
traditionally make up the Society's section of the 
show are being studied. Members and clubs 
planning to enter any of the classes for the 1965 
show are earnestly asked to continue with their 
preparations pending further developments. 



MEMBER'S EVENING 

The first member's evening of the 1964-1%5 sea- 
son will be held on Tuesday, October 6 at 7:30. The 
guest speaker will be Ruth McVaugh Allen (Mrs. 
C. J. Allen, Jr.) whose subject will be "Treasures 
from the garden, field and forest: can they be saved?" 

Mrs. Allen is well-known to botanists and gar- 
deners in the Delaware Valley, and many will re- 
member her fascinating presentation at the Spring 
Luncheon in 1962. 

A graduate of George School, Bucks County, Pa., 
Mrs. Allen was a professional photographer before 
her present consuming interest in nature and con- 
servation took charge of her life. .She serves as 
President of the Ponipeston Creek Watershed Asso- 
ciation, Inc., and, in her own words, spends her life 
"fighting bulldozers and pollution". 



MOVING DAY AT HAND 

The Society's new headquarters at 325 Walnut 
Street in the Independence National Historical Park 
are just about ready. The move will be made in 
September. 

Members are cordially urged to visit the building 
at their earliest opportunity after the move and to 
inspect our greatly improved facilities. 

Dedication ceremonies, followed by an Open 
House will be held on September 30 at 2:30 P.M. 
Members will receive a special invitation to this im- 
portant event early in September. 



HARVEST FAIR 

The Annual Harvest Fair, sponsored by the 
horticulture and landscape alumni will be held on 
the grounds of the Ambler Campus of Temple Univer- 
sity on Saturday, September 26. from 10:00 A. M. 
until 3:00 P.M. This is a fine opportunity to see 
the campus and its facilities for horticulture and 
landscape design educations. 



>BER, 1964 



! PENNSYLVANIA HORTICULTU 




THE PENNSYLVANIA HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY, 1827-1964 



BACKGROUND 

The organization of the Pennsylvania Horticul- 
tural Society in 1827 was a reflection of the times. 
The early members were men and women of substance 
in a prosperous and stable community, members of 
families with roots in colonial and revolutionary days. 
The organizers included George Pepper, Matthew 
Carey and Joseph Hopkinson. The first president was 
Horace Binney. Among his successors were Joseph 
R. Ingersoll, George Vaux, Caleb Cope, Robert 
Patterson and Matthias W. Baldwin. 

Citizens such as these had a natural interest in 
horticulture. They owned houses on ample tracts, 
which they expected to pass to their children and 
grandchildren. They planted seedlings around their 
grounds, enjoying the thought that their descendants 
would appreciate the mature trees as part of their 
inheritance. They were people of affairs with foreign 
contacts through which they could import new and 
interesting species. 

In organizing the Society, they were building on 
a rich horticultural past. In 1685 Francis Pastorious 
had laid out Germantown with a careful eye to the 
"many oak, walnut and chestnut trees and also good 
pastorage for cattle." In 1739 James Logan had pub- 
lished an essay on his experiments with Indian corn. 
From 1728 to 1777 John Bartram had collected, ex- 
changed and planted specimens in the first botanical 
garden in this country. There were scientific agricul- 
turalists such as Judge Richard Peters, collectors of 
exotic plants such as the second William Hamilton, 
introducers of important commercial species such as 
Benjamin Franklin (broom corn) and Lawrence 
Seckel (the Seckel pear). 

THE EARLY YEARS 

The Society was formed "for the purpose of 
promoting and encouraging horticulture by improving 
the growth of vegetables, plants, trees, fruits and 
flowers, and of introducing into our country nevi' 
varieties and species." This was the legal description. 
A less formal statement was "to inspire a taste for 
one of the most rational and pleasing amusements 
of man, and to facilitate the means of cultivating that 
taste." 

— I 



Membership of the Society during its early years 
was small by today's standards, but included leaders 
in many walks of life. The list of officers contains 
such well-known Philadelphia names as Biddle, Pep- 
per, Carey, Longstreth, and Price. The membership 
included proprietors of great seed and plant businesses 
such as Landreth, Buist, Dreer, and Meehan. 

From its founding until the Civil War, the 
Society flourished, progressing to ever larger exhibi- 
tions, with great emphasis on new plants. A descrip- 
tion of the show held in May of 1830 lists such 
exotics as dragon's blood tree, date palm, tea, coffee 
in flower and fruit, pepper, banana, mahogany, olive, 
crassula, a great variety of cacti, pandanus and be- 
gonias. Thousands of spectators visited the show, 
and a reporter was so impressed as to exclaim, "we 
know not how men of adequate means could resist 
the temptation of becoming associates, when they see 
so brilliant an earnest of the manifold good to be 
achieved." 

There were special exhibits of new strawberries, 
roses, camellias, fruits and vegetables. Efforts were 
made to make the Society a scientific body, with 
professorships in horticultural chemistry, botany and 
entomology. Delegates were sent to meetings all over 
the world. By 1850 there were 850 volumes in the 
library. 

PERIOD OF DECLINE 

With the financial and political unrest of the 
1860's came a decline in the Society. For several 
years there were insufficient funds and public interest 
to warrant the annual fall exhibitions. Membership 
fell from a high mark of 800 in 1844 to 150 in 1861. 

Following the Civil War came changes in the 
horticultural life of Philadelphia and in the Horti- 
cultural Society. In the 1880's and 1890's the wealth 
generated by the industrial revolution manifested 

(Cont'd on page 2) 

* Historical portions of this article are based on the history of the Society 
from 1827 to 1927 by James Boyd, a supplement by John C. Wister 
carrying the history forward to 1952, and further supplementary material 
by George R. Clark. 



HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY-(Cont'd) 

itself in large estates, tended by gardeners trained 
in Great Britain. These professionals produced the 
magnificent exhibits displayed in flower shows under 
the estate owners' names, and they became an in- 
creasingly important force in the conduct of the shows 
and in the other affairs of the Society. Also, during 
this period classes for commercial growers appeared 
for the first time on schedules for exhibitions. 

In 1867 the Society obtained the use of the first 
Horticultural Hall, a building at Broad and Lardner 
Streets which was destroyed by fire and rebuilt twice 
— the second time in 1896. By then, professional and 
commercial gardeners were in full control. Their 
interests centered on exhibits and shows, to the vir- 
tual exclusion of other activities. Membership declined ; 
the library was neglected ; meetings became less im- 
portant ; there were no more of the learned discussions 
which had marked the early years. Moreover, the third 
and most elaborate Horticultural Hall proved to be 
an intolerable financial drain. The Society fell to a 
low ebb. 



THE TURNING POINT 

The turning point came in 1917, when Horticul- 
tural Hall was sold, yielding sufficient proceeds to 
pay off all debts and provide a fund which forms a 
major part of the Society's endowment today. Thus, 
the Society traces its present financial stability in 
large measure to ihe generosity of William L. Shaffer, 
president from 1868-1884, who left the Hall in trust 
for the Society, and his sister Elizabeth, who assisted 
in its disposition when it had become more of a 
liability than an asset. 

In 1919, under the leadership of James Boyd and 
C. F. C. Stout, a new program was mapped out to 
include all groups in horticulture — teachers, archi- 
tects, florists, nursery men, garden consultants, pro- 
fessional gardeners, but above all amateurs. From 
then on, the story has been one of continued evolution. 
Membership has greatly increased to the present figure 
of 4700. The gift from her sons in 1947 of Mrs. 
Horatio Gates Lloyd's extensive collection of rare 
horticultural books added new distinction to the li- 
brary, which now includes some 9,000 volumes and 
a wide range of horticultural and botanical magazines, 
bulletins and other publications. The Society's staff 
has increased in size and professional competence, and 
the present table of organization calls for two trained 
horticulturists and a trained librarian in addition to 
secretaries, bookkeeper and receptionist. 

Recent decades have brought changes in the So- 
ciety's program. Horticultural and agricultural re- 
search now centers in The United States Department 
of Agriculture and in those land grant universities 
with large horticultural departments, leaving little 
scope for activity by a group such as the Society. 
The popularity of lectures has waned, bringing an 



end to the long series of distinguished talks delivered 
before the Society starting as early as 1885. The 
management of Philadelphia's largest flower show 
has passed to a separate organization founded by 
florists and nurserymen. The Horticultural Society, 
cooperates closely with the Philadelphia Flower Show 
through mutual officers such as J. Liddon Pennock, 
Jr., and VV. Atlee Burpee, and has responsibility for 
the section of the Show devoted to amateur horti- 
culture. The high standards evident in this section 
have, to a large extent, influenced the tone of the 
whole show, giving it unquestioned superiority over 
all others in this country. 

At the same lime, new fields of horticultural 
interest have developed. Thousands of suburban 
homes have been built, and their owners comprise a 
large segment of the Society's membership and ac- 
count for many of the questions which are answered 
by the Society's staff each month. The garden club 
movement, which began in the Philadelphia area in 
the early 1900's, has grown spectacularly. These 
clubs provide audiences for many talks and demon- 
strations by the Society's staff each year, and the 
Society leans heavily upon them for successful and 
stimulating flower shows. 

Another important development has been the 
organization of specialized plant societies, only a few 
of which were in evidence before 1927. While these 
societies have to a large extent monopolized interest 
in the particular plant families with which they are 
concerned, the Horticultural Society has an important 
part to play in helping specialized organizations to 
stage their shows, in providing library material for 
them and in working with them to secure experts for 
lectures and clinics. 

Garden clubs, plant societies and individual gar- 
deners do not exhaust the Society's constituency. 
As early as 1849, the Society concerned itself with 
municipal problems of a horticultural nature and 
appointed a committee to advise City Council as to 
the eradication of objectionable trees and the planting 
of desirable ones in public squares. In connection 
with the celebration of its 125th Anniversary, the 
Society, then headed by Dr. John B. Carson, presented 
Fairmount Park with the azalea garden adjacent to 
the Art Museum. With the revival of interest in 
the jjeautification of our cities and towns, civic asso- 
ciations, city planners and other groups are expected 
to use the Society's services in increasing numbers. 

THE PROGRAM TODAY 

The backbone of the Society's membership is 
and will remain the individual who is interested in 
horticulture. Increasingly, the Society sees its role 
as service to individuals in all walks of life — providing 
sound information to those who cannot otherwise 
obtain it or who do not know where to look for it, 
affording a meeting place where knowledgeable per- 
sons can discuss their mutual interests and problems, 

(Cont'd on page 5) 



— 2 — 



GARDEN VISITS 

On Sunday, October 11, four gardens in Chestnut 
Hill will be open to members and their guests between 
2:00 and 5:00 P.M. They belong to Mr. and Mrs. 
Schofield Andrews, Mr. and Mrs. Richard T. Nalle, 
Mr. and Mrs. Loring Dam, and Mr. and Mrs. George 
D. Widener. 

The directions for reaching each garden all as- 
sume that the starting point will be Germantown 
Avenue which bisects Chestnut Hill. Gardens may 
be visited in any order, and your membership card 
is your ticket of admission. Members may bring up 
to three guests on payment of $1.00 per guest. Family 
groups will be admitted upon presentation of a Family 
Membership Card. 

Members are requested not to arrive at any gar- 
den before the scheduled opening hour and to leave 
promptly at closing time. The gardens will open re- 
gardless of the weather. As usual, a bus will be pro- 
vided for those wishing it. See page four. 

Garden No. 1. Mr. and Mrs. Schofield Andrews, 
155 Bethlehem Pike. 

A dramatic setting on a steep hillside gives visi- 
tors a view of a wooded valley which should be very 
colorful on this date. 

Go northwest on Bethlehem Pike from 8700 block 
on Germantown Avenue .4 mile to 155. Parking on 
Lynnebrook Lane. 

Garden No. 2. Mr. and Mrs. Richard T. Nalle, Bell's 
Mill Road. 

A small walled garden and a large open area lead 
the visitor down to Mr. Nalle's interesting hobby 
greenhouse. 

Located on Bell's Mill Road one half mile from 
the 9200 block of Germantown Avenue and 100 yards 
from Stenton Avenue. 

Garden No. 3. Mr. and Mrs. Loring Dam, 520 Telner 
Street. 

This enchanting garden, built for two, shows a 
marked Japanese influence. 

Go west on Willow Grove Avenue from the 8000 
block of Germantown Avenue Y^ mile to St. Martin's 
Lane. Turn left and go .3 mile to Mermaid Lane. 
Bear right and travel .2 mile to Huron Street. Turn 
left and go .1 mile to Telner Street. Turn right on 
Telner. 520 is the second house on the left. 

Garden No. 4. Mr. and Mrs. George D. Widener, 
"Erdenheim Farm." 

The greenhouses, cutting garden, fountains and 
borders will be open for visiting. 

Take Germantown Avenue west from Chestnut 
Hill to Thomas Road. (Whitemarsh Country Club). 
Turn right and go .3 mile to Farm. Please follow 
directional signs posted for parking and visit. 

— 3 



FLOWER SHOWS SCHEDULED FOR FALL 
AND EARLY WINTER 

The Society's annual Chrysanthemum Show will 
be held on October 31 and November 1 in the cafeteria 
and hallways of the striking building of the American 
Baptist Convention at Valley Forge. William H. 
Weber of Erdenheim Farms is Chairman, and Mrs. 
George Stott of Lansdale is serving as Co-Chairman. 

The Christmas Show will be staged in the lobby 
of the Western Saving Fund Society at Broad and 
Chestnut Streets. It will open on Wednesday, Decem- 
ber 9 and will continue through Friday, December 11. 
Mrs. Charles Hogg, Jr., is Chairman and has an able 
committee working under her direction. 

In the interests of economy, schedules of these 
two shows have not been mailed to all the member- 
ship. However, they are available and a card or tele- 
phone call to Mrs. William Hett of the Society staff 
requesting either or both will receive her prompt 
attention. Mrs. Hett will be handling entries and 
other arrangements for both shows. 



MEMBER'S EVENING 

Ernesta D. Ballard, Executive Secretary of the 
Pennsylvania Horticultural Society will speak to 
members on "The Art of Training Plants" on Tuesday, 
November 3 at 7:30 P.M. The subject, which is based 
on material covered in her book of the same title, is 
one in which many amateurs are becoming interested. 
It deals with the growth of well-trained plants ; growth 
that has been guided, encouraged, controlled and 
managed with care and skill by the grower. 

In her talk, Mrs. Ballard will give practical advice 
on the techniques employed in training all kinds of 
container-grown plants, including woody plants grown 
in bonsai style and herbaceous plants like African 
violets and begonias. Both live material and colored 
slides will be used to illustrate her presentation. 

Members are reminded that the library will be 
open between 5 :00 and 7 :30 on Member's Evenings. 
They are invited to browse during that time. 



BROMELIAD FANS PLAN MEETING 

Members interested in the organization of a local 
group concerned with the growing of bromeliads are 
invited to the new home of the Society, on Saturday, 
October 17th, at 2:00 P.M. Since most of the avail- 
able literature on the culture of this interesting group 
of plants is written entirely for growers in the warmer 
and moister climates, a local group organized to ex- 
change experiences and suggestions for growing better 
specimens in this area would be helpful. At the meet- 
ing there will be a display of representative bromeliads 
from the most easily grown and readily available to 
some of the more unusual plants. 



DAHLIAS IN THE USA 

This month the Society salutes the American 
Dahlia Society on the occasion of its Golden Anni- 
versary Exhibition and World Dahlia Congress being 
held on September 19 and 20 in the Hotel New Yorker 
in New York City. 

The Dahlia, a tuberous rooted, tender perennial, 
native to the high plains of Mexico, was cultivated by 
the ancient Aztecs and has been popular ever since. 
It is a versatile plant which provides color and interest 
in the herbaceous border from mid-July to frost. It 
is available in fifteen different hybrid forms or type 
classifications and in all colors except blue. Dahlias 
range in height from 18" to 7' with flowers of J/2" to 17" 
in diameter. Their native mountain habitat — a place 
where it rains frequently, where the soil is rocky and 
the temperature is moderate — gives the clues to suc- 
cessful culture, which requires good drainage and 
plenty of water. They will grow better in summers 
that are not too hot. Since the roots are not hardy in 
the Philadelphia area, they must be lifted and stored 
before frost and replanted in the spring. 

Specimen plants are raised from seeds, cuttings, 
single tubers, or root divisions. There are many 
named varieties which are, of course, propagated 
vegetatively. At least two English seed firms list two 
dwarf kinds which produce separate, predetermined 
colors. Among the local favorites are Bishop of 
Landoflf, a low (3') peony flowered type with attrac- 
tive dark foliage and clear, deep red flowers, and the 
Coltness hybrids, dwarf doubles which may be grown 
from seed. 

The plant was named by Cavanilles to honor 
Dr. Andreas Dahl, a famous Swedish botanist and 
student- of Linnaeus. 

There is an active, local branch of the American 
Dahlia Society, the Greater Philadelphia Dahlia 
Society. Its president is Stanley Johnson, a grower 
of national reputation. The organization publishes a 
quarterly bulletin. 

* * * 

Bus Reservations for Garden Visits: 

A bus will leave from the Kennedy Boulevard entrance of 
Suburban Station Building at 1:30 P.M. on Sunday, October 11. 
All reservations and accompanying payment must reach the Society 
office by Wednesday, October 6th. 



r 



Bus Reservation - Garden Visits 
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 11th 

$1.50 per person - (Guests $2.00) 

Return with check to: 

325 Walnut St., PhUa., Pa. 19106 



Name 



Address 



City 

I Telephone 



GARDEN CLINICS 

Topiary ivy — Thursday, November 10th, 10:00 A.M. 

Growing topiary ivy is becoming horticulturally 
stylish. It presents a challenge to the artistic ability, 
technical skill and imagination of the horticulturalist, 
and produces decorative items for the garden, house 
and terrace. 

In the clinic planned for November, Mrs. Ballard, 
Executive Secretary of the PHS, will show how to 
make, plant and grow a topiary specimen like those 
displayed in the 1964 Philadelphia Flower Show. 

Wire, plus the necessary tools and material will 
be available at additional cost for making and planting 
a specimen. Instructor: Ernesta D. Ballard. Fee $2.50. 

Members are asked to check the September 
NEWS for descriptions of the October clinics. 



LILY AUCTION 

The Middle Aflaniic Regional Lily Group !$ 
having a bulb auction on Saturday, October 3, at 
2:00 p. m. It will be held at 2828 Line Lexington 
Road, Hatfield. Pa. This is 1/3 mile west of 
Bethlehem Pike at Line Lexington. All gardeners 
and members of the PHS are welcome. 



Register by using the clip-out coupon. Please enclose check 
and mail to .32.'i Walnut Street. Phila., Pa. 19106. Registrations 
accepted in the order received; confirmation by return post card. 

GARDEN CLINIC RESERVATION 

(Please circle time for which 
registration is being made.) 

n PROPAGATION OF WOODY PLANTS 

Wednesday, October 7, 14 2 :00 P. M. 

7:30 P.M. $4.00 

n PLANTS AND ENVIRONMENT 
Thursday, October 15, 22, 29 
Thursday, November 5, 12, 19 
Thursday, December 3, 10 10:00 A. M. $16.00 

D THEORY & TECHNIQUE OF BONSAI: 
BEGINNERS 
Wednesday, October 21, 28 
Wednesday, November 4, 11 10:30 A. M. $12.00 

D THEORY & TECHNIQUE OF BONSAI 

Wednesday, October 21, 28 

Wednesday, November 4, 11 2:00 P. M. 

7:30 P.M. $12.00 
D TOPIARY IVY 

Tuesday, November 10 10:30 A.M. 



Name 



Street 



City & State - 



Telephone 



— 4 — 



LIBRARY NOTES 

GARDEN LITERATURE 

The Society subscribes to over 110 national and 
regional periodicals on gardening and horticultural 
subjects. A few are magazines, some are trade journals 
and the bulk are publications put out by local, region- 
al and national plant societies, clubs, horticultural 
organizations, arboreta and botanical gardens. The 
staff of the Society scans them all and makes every 
effort to bring articles of exceptional quality or interest 
to the attention of members who are on the look out 
for particular information. From time to time, articles 
of general interest will be reprinted in the NEWS. 

IRIS BOOKS BY W. R. DYKES 

Dykes is a famous name to iris enthusiasts. His 
writings have brought about a greater interest in 
growing different iris. 

Irises was released in 1912 and gives horticultural 
requirements in raising iris. This book is short and 
surpassed by more recent works of others. 

The Genus Iris of 1913 is a huge folio edition 
which is rather technical as well as expensive and 
difficult to obtain. The sequel to this botanical mono- 
graph is more useful to most horticulturists and is 
recommended as a guide to the species. 

Handbook of Garden Irises was offered in 1924 
to give the combined usefulness of having good identi- 
fication keys to all the species as well as their horti- 
cultural demands with descriptions and interesting 
facts concerning each species. A discussion of garden 
hybrids is out-of-date, but no contemporary work has 
been found which presents all the species horticul- 
turally and botanically as William R. Dykes did in 
1924. It is suggested as his most useful volume. 

All three books are available in the library. 

Edward Murray 



SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR 
TO BE SPEAKER AT DEDICATION 

It is with great pleasure that we announce to 
our membership that the main speaker at the cere- 
monies noting the dedication of the Society's new 
headquarters will be the Honorable Stuart L Udall, 
Secretary of the Interior. 

During his four years in office, Mr. Udail has 
proved himself a lover of nature and a staunch 
defender of the country's remaining open spaces. 
He is the author of The Quiet Crisis, an eloquent 
plea for conservation. 

As Secretary of the Interior, Mr. Udall is re- 
sponsible for the National Park Service which has 
renovated the 18th century building the Society 
will occupy in the Independence National Historical 
Park. 



HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY-(Cont'd) 

serving as a clearing house for the latest and best 
information at a time when gardeners are overcome 
with widely advertised new developments, maintaining 
standards of taste and beauty in a field which will be 
of increasing importance in an affluent society. 

In fulfilling this role, the Society has continued 
to supply its traditional consultative, reference and 
library services ; to arrange garden visits ; to stage 
seasonal shows and exhibits, and to present lectures. 
It has also developed a number of new programs — 
an annual plant exchange where members can barter 
plants and trade information ; clinics where members 
can practice techniques with the help of a skilled 
instructor ; members' nights, when members can share 
one another's horticultural experiences and informa- 
tion ; the PHS NEWS, a monthly bulletin devoted 
to items of interest to the membership ; field trips to 
points of horticultural interest in the vicinity; and 
more extended trips conducted by the Society's staff, 
including a highly successful trip to England in the 
spring of 1964. 

Carrying out these programs involves cooperation 
with, and service to, many other organizations — local 
garden clubs, local and regional conservation groups, 
educational institutions with departments of horticul- 
ture and landscape design, and the extension services 
of both the Pennsylvania and the New Jersey State 
Universities. The Society also maintains close rela- 
tions with the Massachusetts and New York Horti- 
cultural Societies and is a member of the American 
Horticultural Society, the National Council of State 
Garden Clubs and the Garden Club Federation of 
Pennsylvania. A subscription to the magazine "Horti- 
culture" published by the Massachusetts Society is 
provided for each member of the Pennsylvania Society. 

At this time, when the Society is broadening 
the base and scope of its activities, it has been fortu- 
nate to obtain new headquarters in Independence 
National Historical Park, for which it is heavily 
indebted to the vision and leadership of past Presi- 
dents Henry Mirick and George R. Clark and to Mrs. 
Richard D. Wood, chairman of the committee which, 
after long study recommended that the move be made. 
These headquarters, consisting of two 18th century 
buildings renovated by the National Park Service to 
meet the specific needs of the Horticultural Society 
and the Philadelphia Society for Promoting Agricul- 
ture, will provide better accommodations for the 
library, better facilities for displays and exhibits, con- 
venient "lecture halls and meeting rooms, a garden 
and greenhouse for practical work, and above all, an 
atmosphere much more conducive to horticultural 
interests than the rooms in the Suburban Station 
Building which the Society has occupied in recent 
years. More than this, it is hoped that the new loca- 
tion in the heart of renascent Philadelphia will facili- 
tate the new role of public service which the Society 
is undertaking. 
•5 — 



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ABOUT THE NEW HEADQUARTERS 

Appropriate dedication ceremonies, an official 
"ribbon cutting," and an "open house" for members 
and the public are being arranged to celebrate the 
formal move of the PHS into its new headquarters in 
Independence National Historical Park on Wednes- 
day, September 30, at 2:00 P.M. 

The Society's new home will have 325 Walnut 
Street as its official address, although the location 
actually will consist of what originally were three 
adjoining 18th century dwellings. We will share the 
site with our older sponsor-companion organization, 
The Philadelphia Society for Promotmg Agriculture, 
founding of which in the year 1785 provides proper 
historic justification for our Society's inclusion in a 
National Park Service project limited to commemorat- 
ing the 1774-1800 era. 

Announcement of final details of the dedication 
program itself must await word on whether national, 
state, and city officials who have been invited will 
be able to fit the event into their busy schedules. 
Nevertheless, it is expected that we will have repre- 
sentatives in attendance from the U. S. Department of 
the Interior, the National Park Service, the State De- 
partment of Agriculture, and the City of Philadelphia. 

William L. Day, president of the Old Philadelphia 
Redevelopment Corporation, will preside at the dedi- 
cation and introduce officials who will talk briefly. 
President R. Gwynne Stout and Dr. Mark Allam, 
President of the Agriculture Society, will close the 
program with an invitation to the audience to inspect 
the new headquarters after the official "cutting" of 
a floral garland at the Walnut Street entrance. 

M. O. Anderson, Superintendent of Independence 
National Historical Park, has furnished us with a 
summary explaining the agreement between the Na- 
tional Park Service and the two Societies, and this 
may be the appropriate moment for advising our mem- 

— 6- 



bership of its terms and conditions. Mr. 
said: 



Anderson 



"In conjunction with the Philadelphia Society for 
Promoting Agriculture, the Pennsylvania Horticul- 
tural Society will occupy the historic Kid-Fling 
Houses in Independence National Historical Park. 

"Nearing completion, the exterior facades of the 
structures have been restored to their original appear- 
ance in the early Nineteenth Century. 

"The interiors, especially redesigned to accom- 
modate the expanded needs of the two Societies, re- 
tain surviving portions of the original buildings. 

"Shortly, the Service and Societies will design 
and construct an Eighteenth Century Garden to the 
west of the Kid-Fling Houses, on the site of the 
historic Hamilton Garden, which the Societies will 
then maintain and interpret. 

"The agreement between the two Societies and the 
National Park Service came about after several years 
of careful planning. The Park Service sought to pre- 
serve the existing Kid-Fling Houses by locating suit- 
able tenants whose names would be intimately con- 
nected with the historic years which Independence 
National Park commemorates." 

Charging the two Societies with responsibility 
for preserving the historic atmosphere and interpreta- 
tion of the buildings and gardens and maintaining a 
high level of public relations therein, the agreement 
also states : 

"The historic structures cwrcupied by the Societies 
will serve as a. center of horticultural and agricultural 
meetings, symposiums, and activities, for horticultural 
displays and exhibits which are historical or cultural 
in nature, and to conduct the normal and routine 
affairs of the associated Societies." 



iBER, 1 



OLUME V, No. 




ELPHIA, PA. 191C 



CHRYSANTHEMUMS ARE FALL FAVORITES 



Fall is the chrysanthemum season, and the immi- 
nence of the Eastern Pennsylvania Chrysanthemum 
Show, to be held October 31 and November 1, makes 
the subject all the more timely. 

Chrysanthemums are a versatile genus, offering 
an almost unlimited variety of shapes, sizes and colors. 
A recent text lists more than 100 hardy garden 
varieties, over 50 exhibition types, two dozen pompons, 
an equal number of dual purpose kinds, and 50 or 
more classified as "out-of-season." Every year new 
varieties are developed. 

The diversity in shape is also striking. The 
simplest are the single types resembling daisies — a 
central disc with a single row (or at most a very 
few rows) of petals. If there are more than five 
rows around a central disc, the bloom is called semi- 
double or duplex. Other categories include decorative 
(aster flowered), anenome, buttons, and pompons, 
whose names are descriptive of their shapes; reflex 
types with irregular curving petals ; exhibition and 
commercial varieties with fully rounded balls of in- 
curved petals, sometimes as much as nine inches in 
diameter, exotic kinds such as spiders, quills and 
spoons; and finally the catch-all "novelties". 

All these manifold varieties trace their origin 
through hybridization and mutation to a handful of 
single-flowered perennial species in the Composicae 
(daisy) family — of which the most important were 
C. morifolium, a native of Japan, C. indicum from China, 
and C. arcticum from Mongolia. Confucius may have 
been looking at chrysanthemums when he took note 
of "masses of yellow daisies in the fields", and unmis- 
takeable chrysanthemum blooms are depicted on 
ancient Chinese pottery. 

Since the tenth century, the chrysanthemum has 
been the national flower of Japan, and despite the 
popularity of the genus in the United States and 
Great Britain, the Japanese remain the foremost hy- 
bridizers and growers. Not only do they excel at 
producing exhibition blooms and sprays, they also 
train their plants as standards and cascades of in- 
credible size and symmetry as well. Their annual 



chrysanthemum shows are among Japan's biggest 
tourist attractions. 

The culture of chrysanthemums is dominated by 
day length. The formation of flower buds is triggered 
when the days become noticeably shorter than the 
nights (about August 15th in this latitude), and this 
once meant that chrysanthemums were in flower only 
in the fall. However, it is now possible to produce 
blooms throughout the year by shading the plants 
with heavy black cloth to shorten the day in summer, 
and using lights to lengthen the day in winter. Most 
commercial chrysanthemum catalogs give schedules 
for producing out-of-season bloom. 

Chrysanthemum shows in this country usually 
feature blooms, a single flower to a stem produced by 
removing all flower buds but one, and sprays, a group 
of flowers on a single stem. The Eastern Pennsylvania 
Show, for example, lists 38 classes of sprays and 25 
classes of blooms for amateurs plus 10 classes of 
sprays and 62 of blooms open to all. The definition 
of sprays has become so technical that an entry 
which would be rejected at one show may well be 
accepted and awarded a prize at another. 

A more recent development in American shows 
— doubtless as a result of the interest generated by 
visits to Japan — is classes for trained chrysanthemum 
plants. Again the Eastern Pennsylvania Show is an 
example. Its schedule includes classes for specimen 
bush plants, standards, cascades and bonsai. 

Producing chrysanthemums in these forms re- 
quires great horticultural skill and, above all, time 
and patience. The plants must be watered frequently 
and fed often during the growing season and there 
is no way to cure the harm caused by mistake or 
neglect. The results that can be achieved may be 
seen during the fall season at Longwood Gardens in 
the form of magnificent cascades and hanging baskets 
which rival the best the Japanese can offer. Penn- 
sylvania Horticultural Society members interested in 
learning how it is done should watch the Society's 
schedules for talks and clinics on the subject, which 
are presented nearly every year. 



DEDICATION OF NEW HEADQUARTERS 




The dedication of the Society's new headquarters 
took place on Wednesday, September 30. Nearly 700 
people heard the principal address, given by the 
Secretary of the Interior in the Old Customs House. 
More than 1000 came to the Society's open house 
after Secretary Udall's talk. 

In addition to the Secretary, distinguished partici- 
pants and visitors included Mayor James H. J. Tate. 
Frederic R. Mann, Chairman of the Fairmount Park 
Commission, who presented President R. Gwynne 
Stout with an official proclamation of September 30 
as City of Philadelphia Horticulture Day; Judge Edwin 

O. Lewis, Chairman of 
the Independence Na- 
tional Park Advisory 
Commision; Ronald 
Lee, Director of North- 
east Region, National 
Parks Service w h o 
introduced Secretary 
Udall ; William L. Day. 
President of the Old 
Philadelphia Develop- 
ment Corporation, who 
presided at the cere- 
mony ; and Dr. Mark 
W. Allam, President of 
the Society for Promot- 
ing Agriculture, who 
„ . , presided at a lunch 

Secretary Udall and President , . ,, 

Stout on library staircase. before the ceremony. 

Members of the Society responsible for the ar- 
rangements were: Mrs. James C. Hornor, coordinator 
for the Dedication Ceremony and Open House ; Mrs. 
Edward L. Elliot, in charge of food and refreshments ; 
Mrs. H. Cameron Morris, Jr., who took responsibility 
for all flower arrangements; Mrs. W. R. Mackinney, 
who recruited the hostesses ; Mrs. Walter W. Pollock, 
Jr., Chairman of the Public Relations and Member- 
ship Committee; and Mrs. Harold L. Haines, who 
entertained the press. 

The following are highlights of the proceedings: 
Citation to Secretary Udall, presented by Mr. Stout 
"In deep admiration for his scholarly presentation 
of "The Quiet Crisis" as it afifects every American 
today and in the years to come, the Pennsylvania 
Horticultural Society now presents to the 
Honorable Stewart L. Udall, Secretary of the 
Department of the Interior of the United States 
of America, the Society's highest tribute — our 
Distinguished Achievement Award — for out- 
standing leadership in conservation." 
Introduction to Dedication Ceremony — Mr. Day 

"This is not an ordinary event. It is part and parcel of a 
deeply significant movement here in Philadelphia to restore to 
economic health areas in our central core which have been 
neglected and unappreciated for decades. 

"For years, several hundred historic structures intimately 
associated with the founding of our covmtry have been condemned, 
through neglect, to the bulldozer. It would have been only a 
matter of time before most of them would have disappeared. 
Happily, today, over 400 structures have been identified and 



will be restored to their original condition. Additionally, new 
town houses are being built and lovely park areas and greenways 
are taking shape. Birds are singing where a few years ago we 
heard only the clanging and banging of metal presses or work- 
mens' tools. This should be a source of great pride to Philadel- 
phians. A lot lies ahead but we should not forget that a lot 
has been accomplished. We are on our way towards a realizable 
goal — the complete restoration and economic rehabilitation of one 
of the most historic areas in our country. 

"What could be more appropriate than to have The Penn- 
sylvania Horticultural Society move its headquarters here. A 
venerable society, with great traditions on the one hand and 
vigorous and forward looking policies and activities on the other, 
will bring life and purpose to the area. Each year, the Independ- 
ence Hall area is visited by missions from all parts of the world. 
It is one of Philadelphia's great showcases. This new headquarters 
and the 18th century garden, which is planned, will do a lot to 
enhance the total scene. This dedication is a happy event for all 
of us and a proud moment for our city," 

Address by the Secretary of the Interior (excerpts) 

"The new role of public service being undertaken by the 
Horticultural Society stems naturally from your past. Your pro- 
grams have beautified and enriched your community and they 
have fitted the needs and demands of the times. Today, environ- 
mental changes are so swift as to be almost kaleidoscopic. The 
opportunity for public service is enormous. Your record of per- 
formance leaves no doubt as to how you will handle this current 
opportunity. 

"President Johnson spoke only last week in Oregon of the 
three forces of change which are at work constantly upon our 
environment and with which we must cope if we are to preserve 
its quality. The first of these forces is population. By the year 
2000, more than 300 million Americans will need 10 times the 
power and 2 Vz times the water we now use. Increasing demands 
will tax our resources — increasing leisure will tax our recreation 
facilities. 

"The second force is technology. The bright, triumphant 
face of this coin is backed by a darker side. Eventually, unless 
we act decisively and creatively, the waste products of this vigor- 
ous technology may prove the deadliest of all threats to nature. 

"The third force is urbanization. With more and more of our 
people clustering together in cities, access to natural beauty is 
denied and ancient values are lost sight of. More attention is 
needed to provide within cities the kind of gracious touches of 
nature which the Horticultural Society so splendidly achieved for 
Philadelphia with establishment of the azalea gardens next to the 
Art Museum. More such deeds to upgrade the quality of our 
urban society are desperately needed today. 

"I would like to share with you today the five-point conserva- 
tion program outlined on his Western trip by the President — 
a program big enough and bold enough to challenge the mind 
and spirit, visionary enough to take in the entire problem, and 
detailed enough to do the job. 

"First, we propose to guarantee our children a place to learn 
about their out-of-doors in natural surroundings. With outdoor 




Secretary ot the Interior, Stewart L. Udall, presenting keys to 
Dr. Marl W. Allam, President ot the Philadelphia Society for 
Promoting Agriculture, and R. Swynne Stout, President PHS. 
recreation demands doubling every decade, we have to be ready 
to meet the developing needs. This is what we are getting 
ready to do right now. A national program of scenic parkways 
and scenic riverways is on the horizon. We are working with 

(Continued on page 4) 



MEMBER'S EVENING 

Walter H. Hodge will be the speaker on Tuesday, 
December 1st. Dr. Hodge, well-known to many Phila- 
delphians because of his recent association with Long- 
wood Gardens, is planning an illustrated talk entitled 
"More Plants for Man". He has provided the follow- 
ing summary: 

"The introduction of plants from one region to another, from 
the wild into cultivation, is as old as agriculture itself, and it will 
continue as long as man moves about the surface of the earth. 
The curious, the beautiful, and the useful plants that have been 
found in all comers of the globe have been carried by man from 
place to place, some to find a new home and some to die either 
because of man's ignorance as to their needs or the plant's in- 
ability to adjust to a new environment. The success of man's plant 
introductions has been amazing and is typified by such well known 
cultivated species as wheat, potato, coffee, rubber . . . the centers 
of production of all of which are now far removed from the native 
homeland of the parent species. The same is true of most of 
our commonly planted ornamentals. 

"The need for plant introduction is a continual one. This 
talk will deal with the romance and the how and why of foreign 
plant exploration as it has been carried on during the past quarter 
century and primarily by plant explorers of the United States 
Department of Agriculture." 



EDMUND BACON TO BE SPEAKER 
AT ANNUAL MEETING 

A reception and dinner will precede the Society's 
137th Annual Meeting, which will be held on Wednes- 
day, November 18th. Following a report from the 
President and the election of Council members, 
Edmund N. Bacon, Executive Director of the City 
Planning Commision, will present an illustrated talk, 
"Horticulture in Renascent Philadelphia". 

The Council is the governing body of the Penn- 
sylvania Horticultural Society. Council members are 
elected for a three year period. 

To be presented for election at the 1964 Annual 
Meeting for terms expiring in 1967 are: 

Alfred H. Campbell, Jr. 
Mrs. Van Horn Ely 
Theodore Foulk, II 
Mrs. James C. Hornor 
J. Liddon Pennock, Jr. 
Mrs. J. Pancoast Reath 
Mrs. Francis H. Scheetz 
R. Gwynne Stout 
Joseph B. Townsend, Jr. 
William H. Weber 

Also to be presented are the names of Mrs. 
Alfred S. Martin, Mrs. Leon Sunstein, Jr. and Eugene 
Udell, who have been appointed by the Council to 
fill vacancies caused by resignations. The terms of 
Mrs. Martin and Mrs. Sunstein will expire December 
31, 1966 and that of Dr. Udell, December 31, 1967. 

The by-laws provide that additional nominations 
may be made in writing by 15 or more members of 
the Society. Officers of the Society are elected by the 
Council at the first meeting of the new year. 

Members will receive an invitation to the Dinner 
meeting in late October. Mrs. Edward L. Elliot is 
Chairman and is responsible for the arrangements. 



FALL FIELD TRIP 

On Saturday, November 21, members and their 
guests are invited to join our staff horticulturist, June 
M. Vail, on a trip to the holly orchard of the New 
Jersey Silica Sand Company in Millville, New Jersey. 
This orchard of American hollies is particularly inter- 
esting for the maturity of the plants and for the differ- 
ences in fruiting, foliage and growth habits which 
become evident only when a great many varieties are 
brought together. Mr. David Fenton, horticulturist 
at the orchards will guide the group. There will be 
time for browsing in the orchard and for examining 
the displays in the Holly House. Bring a box lunch. 

The bus will leave the Society building, 325 
Walnut Street, at 9 A.M. and will return by 5 P.M. 

Bus Reservation - Holly Orchard 
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 21 st 

$2.50 per person • (guests $3.75) 

Return with check to: 

325 Walnut St., Phila., Pa. 19106 



Name 

Address . . 

City 

Telephone 



GARDEN CLINICS 

Christmas Wreath Making 

Tuesday, December 1st — 10:30 A.M. 

Wreath inaking is of timely interest this coming 
month. A wreath-inaking clinic will be held in the 
basement classroom of the new building at 325 Walnut 
Street on December 1st. After a demonstration each 
member of the class will be supplied with materials 
and supervised in making a wreath to take home. 
Extra materials will be available at cost for those 
who wish to make additional wreaths or other decora- 
tions. Registrants must bring a pair of sharp pruning 
shears. Fee $1.50. Instructor, June M. Vail, staff 
horticulturist. 

Grafting Techniques 

Wednesdays, December 2, 9 — 10:30 A.M. 

A series of two clinics in which the theory and 
techniques of grafting will be discussed and explained 
is planned for December. 

Dr. John C. Swartley, Chairman, Department of 
Horticulture, Ambler Campus of Temple University, 
will be the instructor. The clinic series will be held 
at 10:30 A.M. on the mornings of Wednesday, De- 
cember 2, and Wednesday, December 9, in the base- 
ment classroom of The Society's new headquarters. 
They will consist of discussion and demonstration. 
Dr. Swartley will provide material on which partici- 
pants may practice. Suggestions for equipment and 
suitable plants will be made. Fee for series - $5.00. 



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DEDICATION-(Cont'cl) 



the States and local communities to encourage and make possible 
open space programs and to help clean up pollution and sweep 
away blight. 

"Second, we propose to control the waste products of tech- 
nology. Chemical pollutants, radiation, discarded automobiles, 
cardboard containers, tin cans — all the litter that lies behind the 
glitter of modem life — these are one of the gravest threats to the 
quality of our life, and President Johnson last week declared his 
intention to work with local government and industry to develop 
national policy for control and disposal of technological and 
industrial waste. 

"Third, we propose to increase our mastery over our environ- 
ment by using the marvels of this new technology. Specifically, 
this means rapidly increasing emphasis on comprehensive river 
basin development — regional power interties — desalting of sea 
water — new methods foi extracting minerals and fuels — better 
understanding and even control of weather. It means encouraging 
the development of the genius of man to unlock the secrets of 
the earth. 

"Fourth, we propose to prevent urbanization from ravaging 
the land. Policies are even now under development which would 
apply the cooperative efforts of local governments and private 
industry to this problem. Their goal will be to insure that suburb- 
an building, highway construction, industrial spread, are conducted 
with reverence and the proper regard for the values of nature. 

"Fifth, we propose to conduct conservation on a global scale. 
Such developments as the recently concluded Canadian Treaty for 
full international development of the Columbia River's great 
water and power potential — the Antarctic Treaty — weather and 
fishery agreements — these are only a few of the ways in which 
conservation is becoming planet-wide. 

"The event we celebrate here today is in keeping with the 
conservation quest for quality. You have a rich understanding of 
what is at stake and have demonstrated your willingness to add 
significantly to the quality of your environment. It is groups such 
as yours, each with its special approach or field of interest, which 
will help us give substance to our dreams for a safer, a healthier, 
a more beautiful America. I congratulate you." 



SPRING FLOWER SHOW 

As reported in the PHS News for September, The 
Philadelphia Flower Show will not be held in the Spring 
of 1965. The reason for the suspension of this, the finest 
show in the country, is the rebuilding of the Exhibition 
Hall of the Trade and Convention Center. Since The 



Flower Show is, and has been for many years, one of the 
Society's most important activities, the Council and staff 
have spent many weeks studying ways and means of 
staging an interim show. 

We are pleased now to inform our members that a 
location has been chosen for The Society's first Spring 
Flower Show. It will be held in the Armory of The First 
City Troop at 23rd and Ranstead Streets. The Show 
will open on Saturday, March 13, 1965 and will run 
through Thursday, March 18th. Mrs. Franklin d'Olier, 
the Chairman has formed a committee which is prepar- 
ing the schedule. It will be mailed to members in the 
near future. 



Register by using the clip-out coupon. Please enclose check 
and mail to .92.'> Walnut Street. Phila.. Pa. 19106. Registrations 
accepted in the order received; confirmation by return post card. 

GARDEN CLINIC RESERVATION 

(Please circle time for which 
registration is being made.) 

□ TOPIARY IVY 

Tuesday, November 10 10:30 A.M. $ 2.50 

n CHRISTMAS WREATH MAKING 

Tuesday, December 1 10:30 A.M. $ 1.50 

D PROPAGATION 

Wednesday, December 2 

Wednesday, December 9 10:30 A.M. $ 5.00 

Name 

Street 

City & State _ 

Telephone 



NEW HEADQUARTERS, EXHIBITS AND MEETINGS 



The Society's first weeks in its new headquarters 
have added new dimensions to its program in exhibits 
and meetings. Both these activities were of lesser 
importance before, because the setting in the old rooms 
was not conducive to attractive displays or comfort- 
able accommodations for meetings. The new building 
has already proved popular with garden clubs, plant 
societies and other horticultural groups, as well as 
with sightseers in the Independence National Park 
and members of the .Society who drop in to browse 
in the library or discuss a horticultural problem with 
a member of the staff. 

The presence of so many people who share the 
Society's field of interest makes it appropriate, almost 
obligatory, for the Society to provide continuous 
horticultural exhibits. Indeed, the agreement with the 
National Park Service calls for exhibitions to be open 
to the public at all times. Arranging for these displays 
has proved stimulating and educational for staflf and 
members alike. A whole new field of activity has 
opened up — one which requires imagination and 
research in planning the exhibits and practical in- 
genuity in staging them. 

THE FIRST EXHIBIT 

The first exhibit in the new headquarters was 
staged by the Society and the Philadelphia Society 
for Promoting Agriculture in connection with the 
opening and dedication of the building. The idea was 
to show some of the plants, tools and written material 
that were available and might have been exhibited 
in the period between 1785 and 1830, when the two 
Societies had their beginnings. 

The Society for Promoting Agriculture obtained 
from the Pennsylvania Farm Museum some repre- 
sentative farm tools — a grain cradle, a pitch fork 
and a plow — constructed almost entirely of wood. 
It also displayed early pictures of prize cattle and 
early records and memorabilia of the Society. 

The Horticultural Society also showed some of 
its historical records, including the minutes of the 
organization meeting, plant exploration reports by 
Bartram and Michaux. and one of Humphrey Repton's 
elaborately illustrated volumes on landscape design. 



In addition, it assembled a selection of the fruits, 
wines and tropical plants which were listed in the 
accounts of the Society's first show held in 1829. 

These exhibits were well received. It was fas- 
cinating to see the contrast between the nineteenth 
century fruits, most of which have disappeared from 
twentieth century gardens and markets, and the nine- 
teenth century tropical plants, virtually all of which 
are still available and regarded as choice exotics today. 
But the interest of the viewers was by no means the 
sole benefit of the project. The challenges it presented 
to those who staged it and the pleasure of meeting 
those challenges were equally important. 

CHALLENGES IN MATERIAL AND DISPLAY 

First there was the overall problem of display 
equipment. This was solved by Abstracta, a simple 
and infinitely flexible system of structural framing 
designed by the Swedish architect, Paul Cadovius. 
Also, it was necessary to design and build glass cabi- 
nets to hang in the Abstracta frame. Along the same 
lines, decorative wooden backgrounds were developed 
for the display of photographs and the like. 

The substance of the exhibit was as challenging 
as the display technique. After the researchers had 
compiled a list of the fruits and plants to be shown, 
the question still remained where to get them. Ex- 
tensive inquiries turned up Lady Apples from the 
orchards of the Virginia Polytechnic Institute; grapes, 
apples, pears, mulberry leaves and black Mexican 
sweet corn from the New York State Agricultural 
experiment stations; Belleflower, Wolf River, Spitzen- 
berg. Golden Pippin, Rhode Island Greening, Dominie, 
Winter Rambo, King David and other old time varie- 
ties of apples at the orchard of Daniel Brubaker, 
Ephrata, Pa., and dandelion, elderberry, cherry, peach 
and grape home-made wines from an interested mem- 
ber. Mr. Clement B. Newbold, a member of the So- 
ciety, supplied Seckel pears and also such romantically 
named species as Beurre Rose, Beurre d'Anjou, 
Klapp's favorite, Bosc, KeifFer and Sheldon. 

THE FIRST MEETINGS 

One of the first group meetings at the new build- 

(ConVd next page] 



NEW HEADQUARTERS-(Confd) 

ing was equally stimulating. Registrants in the An- 
nual Symposium on Pennsylvania Gardens gathered 
in the Society's auditorium for a round of tea-tasting 
after a morning session at Strawberry Mansion. Dr. 
George H. M. Lawrence, Director of the Hunt Bo- 
tanical Library, had addressed the morning session 
on the "History and Romance of our Herbals". Await- 
ing the group on their arrival at the Society's head- 
quarters was a collection of many of the important 
and historical- volumes mentioned by Dr. Lawrence, 
all obtained from the Society's library : 

Dioscorides, two herbals, one printed by Claudio 
Mace in Valencia in 1651, the other by Claudius 
Marnus in Frankfurt in 1598. 

Rempert Dodoens, a volume printed by Christo- 
pher Plantin in Antwerp in 1583. 

Leonhard Fuchs, two volumes, one printed by 
Isingriniana in Basil in 1542 and the other by 
Balthazar Arnolletus in Leyden in 1551. 

John Gerarde, three editions of "The herball or 
generall historic of plants", printed in London 
in 1597, 1633 and 1636. 

Nicholas Culpepper, "The English physitian" 
printed by Peter Cole in London in 1652. 

John Parkinson, "Theatrum botanicum" printed 
in London by Thomas Cotes in 1640. 

Also displayed was a modern reprint of the famous 
Badianus manuscript, an Aztec herbal of 1552. 

In these days of miracle drugs, herbals are of 
more than passing interest. They contain descriptions 
of real and imaginary plants known or thought to 
have curative properties. Their development illus- 
trates not only the stagnant state of horticultural 
knowledge in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, 
but also the gradual improvement in printing and the 
fascinating interplay of textual borrowings and fresh 
observations by the various authors. 

FUTURE ACTIVITIES 

The exhibition for November centers around dried 
material and will illustrate both the techniques of 
drying leaves and flowers and the methods of arrang- 
ing and displaying them. In December, the subject 
of the exhibit will be Christmas trees and Christmas 
decorations of natural materials. There will be speci- 
mens of most of the available material and information 
as to its lasting quality in the house and techniques 
for minimizing the fire hazard. 

The exhibit committee is headed by Mrs. Alfred 
S. Martin, and Mrs. John H. Archer. Miss Joan Tay- 
lor, a landscape architect practicing in Philadelphia, is 
professional consultant to the committee. Members 
who have ideas or material for future exhibits are 
invited to sulimit their suggestions. Volunteers to 
work on the exhibits will be welcomed. 



... If you wish to make anything grow yo\i 
must understand !t, and understand it in a very 
real sense. "Green fingers" are a fact, and a 
mystery only to the unpracticed. But green fingers 
are the extensions of a verdant heart. A good 
garden cannot be made by somebody who has 
not developed the capacity to know and love 
growing things. 

The Education of a Garden 
by Russell Page 



GARDEN CLINICS FOR JANUARY 

Planning the Herbaceous Border — a series of 
five sessions — Wednesdays, January 13, 20, and 27, 
February 3 and 10, 10:30 to 12:30 a.m. 

Because of its great popularity, this course is being 
oflfered for the third consecutive year, but with two 
added sessions to allow for study of additional prob- 
lems. 

Each member of the class will be assigned four 
separate problems progressing from a single two-color 
plan to a multi-color, all-season border design. These 
problems will illustrate the value of a plan, the use 
of color and texture, the succession of bloom and the 
importance of scale. Each plan will be discussed and 
analyzed by the instructor and the class, which is 
limited to six students. Reservations accepted for the 
series only. Instructor: Martha Luddes Garra. Fee: 
$35.00. 

Growing Espaliers — Thursday, January 14, 7:30 
p.m. 

This clinic will give members a chance to prune, 
trim and fasten a plant in espalier form. The discus- 
sion will cover not only espalier technique, but also 
subsequent care and maintenance. 

In order to make the clinic as comprehensive as 
possible, several species of plants will be used. Among 
them will be Hicks yew, Laland firethorn, Deils coton- 
easter and several varieties of fruit trees. 

Each participant will take home the plant he 
has worked on. Sharp clippers required. Instructor: 
L. B. Palmer of Rose Valley Nurseries. Fee : (includ- 
ing materials) $8.00. 

Propagation of Herbaceous Materials from seed 
and cuttings — Tuesdays, January 12 and 19, 10:30 
a.m. 

A series of two clinics illustrating methods of 
sowing seed and making cuttings for your spring 
garden. Selection of varieties, soil or rooting media, 
and the handling of seedlings will be discussed. Fol- 
lowing a demonstration, each participant will prepare 
a seed pan and a flat under the supervision of the 
instructor. Seed, cutting material, containers and 
media will be supplied. Sharp knives will be provided 
at additional cost for those who do not bring their 
own. Registrations accepted for the series only. In- 
structor : June M. Vail, staff horticulturist. Fee for the 
series: $4.00. 



IRISH GARDEN TOUR SCHEDULED FOR MAY 

Following last spring's highly successful tour of 
England and Wales, the Society is planning another 
garden tour next spring under the direction of Mrs. 
Edward J. Garra. This 21 day trip will be to Ireland. 
The itinerary has been planned for discriminating 
travelers whose main interest is plants and gardens. 

The group will leave Philadelphia on Monday 
evening May 10th for the flight to Shannon. After 
a day of leisure at Dromoland Castle, three days will 
be spent in Killarney enjoying the lakes and visiting 
the Muck'ross Estate, Dorreen House Gardens and 
Garanish Island in Bantry Bay. Annesgrove, Birr 
Castle and the Rock of Cashel are other highlights to 
be seen before going north to Dublin. 

The second week will be in Dublin with time 
for sightseeing, including the Botanic Garden, Trinity 
College and Phoenix Park and day trips to Pamers- 
court, Malahide Castle, Russborough House and the 
Vale of Glendalough. There will also be ample oppor- 
tunity for shopping and individual pursuits. 

The last week will include two days in Belfast 
visiting the famous National Trust gardens. Mount 
Stewart and Rowallane, and several small private 
gardens ; a day's drive around the coast of Antrim ; 
and visits to Castle Coale, Florence Court and Glen- 
veagh Castle, with its dramatic setting. The tour will 
return on Monday, May 31st. 

A postcard requesting the detailed itinerary and 
registration form will bring this information to mem- 
bers by return mail. 



325 WALNUT STREET 
HEADQUARTERS BUILDING 

Now that we are settled in our splendid new 
building in The Independence National Historical 
Park, we wonder how we managed without it. Those 
who work here, as well as Council and Committee 
members who are frequent visitors are enthusiastic 
about the spaciousness of the facilities, the attractive- 
ness of the area and the ease of parking. 

The headquarters building is at 325 Walnut 
Street. It is on the north side of Walnut about two- 
thirds of the way from 3rd Street to 4th Street. For 
the benefit of members who are apprehensive about 
visiting this part of the city we are pleased to provide 
the following information : 

Approach by car : Vine Street to 6th ; south on 
6th to Chestnut ; east on Chestnut and park at 4th and 
Chestnut or continue to 2nd Street ; south on 2nd to 
Walnut ; park at temporary lot between 2nd and 3rd 
on Walnut or turn right on 3rd to large parking lot 
between Walnut and Chestnut. There is also a con- 
venient lot on 4th Street between Walnut and Locust. 
No one has reported difficulty in getting space in any 
of these lots. 

After 6:30 p.m., parking is permitted on the south 
side of Walnut directly in front of the entrance to 
the building. 



Approach by public transportation: The 10c loop 
bus travels from the Suburban Station, across 17th 
to Chestnut, down Chestnut to 5th, across 5th to 
Market and back to the Suburban Station. It runs 
between 7:20 a.m. and 6:13 p.m. daily. On Wednes- 
day night it runs until 9:17 p.m. 

The D bus travels down Chestnut to 4th, turns 
south on 4th and goes back up Walnut Street. It 
stops on 4th in the middle of the block and on Walnut 
after it has turned the corner — either stop is within 
J4 block of the building. 

Other buses to Front and Chestnut and to 2nd 
and Chestnut stop just in front of Carpenters' Hall to 
discharge passengers. Members using these buses can 
walk through the Park to our back door. 

For the reassurance of members who come to 
the building at night, we would like to remind you 
that because we are in the Independence National 
Historical Park, our property is patrolled by 
uniformed guards 24 hours a day. 



MEMBERS' EVENINGS 

The program on Tuesday evening, January 5, 
1965, is planned for those who have — or wish they 
had — a greenhouse. A group of expert panelists will 
speak on what they grow and how. There will be 
a short film prepared by the Department of Horticul- 
ture at Penn State and slides of unusual and colorful 
greenhouse plants. 

The panelists are Mrs. John Knorr, Mrs. Sidney 
Keith, and Dr. and Mrs. J. J. Willaman. Ernesta D. 
Ballard, Executive Secretary of the Society, will act 
as moderator. Since the panelists and the moderator 
have, among them, grown just about everything that 
can be grown under glass, the evening should be most 
informative. 

The program will begin at 7:30 p.m. As usual, 
the library will be open throughout the late afternoon 
and evening for the convenience of members who are 
not able to visit the building during the day. 

It has been suggested that a simple buflfet supper 
be served between 6:00 and 7:00 p.m. We are pleased 
to invite all who can to make a reservation IN 
ADVANCE to join us at that time. 



MEMBERS' EVENING BUFFET SUPPER 

$2.00 per person 

Please accept my reservation for Tuesday, January 5, 1965. 
Return with check by December 31 to: 

MRS. F. E. GODSHALK 

P.H.S. 325 Walnut Street 

Philadelphia, Pa. 19106 

Name 

Address 

City 

Telephone 

I enclose my cheek for $ fo cover reservations. 



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ABOUT THE ENCLOSURE 

A year ago the Society installed a mechanized 
file to sort our members according to their special 
interests and skills. Information obtained from these 
cards helps us plan programs, arrange activities and 
send you notices and information in your fields of 
interest. 

The file can accomplish its purpose only if mem- 
bers will cooperate by checking appropriate headings 
and dropping this post card in the nearest mailbox. 



THANKS . . . 

The NEWS is the voice of the PHS. While the 
staff is responsible for editing and production, much 
of the horticultural content is contributed by the 
membership. 

Our sincere thanks go to the following members 
who have contributed ideas, outlines and manuscripts 
during the last year: 

Mrs. J. Folsom Paul 

Mrs. Edward J. Garra 

Miss Viola Anders 

Mrs. James Bush-Brown 

Miss Mary S. Green 

Thomas Dolan, 4th 

Charles Becker, Jr. 

John C. Wister 

Frederic L. Ballard, Jr. 



Frances E. Godshalk of Chester Springs has 
joined the staff as Administrative Assistant. She 
will have primary responsibility for staging of shows 
and exhibits in the rooms and in the field and will 
work with members and committees in presenting 
the Society's service to the community. 

Mrs. Godshalk is past chairman and a member 
of the Philadelphia Unit of the Herb Society of 
America and a member of the Conestoga Garden 
Club. 



CHRISTMAS GIFT SUGGESTION: 




A YEAR'S MEMBERSHIP 
IN THE P.H.S. . . . 



ASK FOR OUR SPECIAL GIFT CERTIFICATE 



Register by using the clip-out coupon. Please enclose check 
and mail to 32S Walnut Street. Phila.. Pa. 19106. Registrations 
accepted in the order received; confirmation by return post card. 

GARDEN CLINIC RESERVATION 



n CHRISTMAS WREATH MAKING 

Tuesday, December 1 10:30 A.M. 


D PLANNING HERBACEOUS BORDER 

Wednesday, January 13, 20, 27 10:30 A.M. 
Wednesday, February 3, 10 10:30 A.M. 


n PROPAGATION 

Tuesday, January 12, 19 


10:30 A.M. 


D GROWING ESPALIERS 
Thursday, January 14 


7:30 P.M. 


Name _ 




Street 


Citv & State 


Telephone „ ~ 



PEi,,,o(LVANIA HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 



3 1827 00017431 7 





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NO. 23233